Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Things are looking up for Microsoft Success!!!

  1. #21


    Posts : 302
    Windows 7 on the desktop, Windows 8 Surface Pro mobile


    Quote Originally Posted by pcRat View Post
    Bill, what do you mean by a walled garden? Is it is too small screen size? Or the icons on the screen for menu?
    A walled garden is a way of completely segregating an app from the rest of the system. Within its garden(restrictions), it can do anything. Outside it, nothing. So the system can't mess with it, and the app can't mess with the system. If it wants to access say your webcam or your internet, it has to explicitly request it as part of the app download process. It also makes it very easy to uninstall, as the opsys simply blows up(deletes) its garden.

    A good analogy is its in a room in a hotel on your system. If you want to get rid of it, you just clean out its room.

    A traditional application actually takes up residence in your house and moves stuff around and has full access. Its also harder to remove as only it knows all the things its added to your system.. so its responsible for cleaning up after itself when you call its uninstaller and tell it to leave.

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #22


    Thanks Bill & chrisa re: walled garden. ♪ ♫ I love Windows ♪ ♫
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #23


    Quote Originally Posted by chrisa View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by pcRat View Post
    Bill, what do you mean by a walled garden? Is it is too small screen size? Or the icons on the screen for menu?
    A walled garden is a way of completely segregating an app from the rest of the system. Within its garden(restrictions), it can do anything. Outside it, nothing. So the system can't mess with it, and the app can't mess with the system. If it wants to access say your webcam or your internet, it has to explicitly request it as part of the app download process. It also makes it very easy to uninstall, as the opsys simply blows up(deletes) its garden.

    A good analogy is its in a room in a hotel on your system. If you want to get rid of it, you just clean out its room.

    A traditional application actually takes up residence in your house and moves stuff around and has full access. Its also harder to remove as only it knows all the things its added to your system.. so its responsible for cleaning up after itself when you call its uninstaller and tell it to leave.
    What you have described is a sand box. A walled garden is M$ will not allow any other APPs other than what they have approved to be installed on your system.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #24


    Posts : 5,360
    7/8/ubuntu/Linux Deepin


    A walled garden is M$ will not allow any other APPs other than what they have approved to be installed on your system.
    Yes, exactly. It is all for your own good, of course.

    It will get worse - less user control, more surveillance.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #25


    Quote Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
    A walled garden is M$ will not allow any other APPs other than what they have approved to be installed on your system.
    Yes, exactly. It is all for your own good, of course.

    It will get worse - less user control, more surveillance.
    Lions, and tigers, and bears! Oh my!
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #26


    Posts : 5,360
    7/8/ubuntu/Linux Deepin


    I suppose there is an appeal in living in a child like fantasy. It avoids dealing with the real world.

    Not sure I would like to be permanently in that state, though.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #27


    Posts : 302
    Windows 7 on the desktop, Windows 8 Surface Pro mobile


    Quote Originally Posted by labeeman View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by chrisa View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by pcRat View Post
    Bill, what do you mean by a walled garden? Is it is too small screen size? Or the icons on the screen for menu?
    A walled garden is a way of completely segregating an app from the rest of the system. Within its garden(restrictions), it can do anything. Outside it, nothing. So the system can't mess with it, and the app can't mess with the system. If it wants to access say your webcam or your internet, it has to explicitly request it as part of the app download process. It also makes it very easy to uninstall, as the opsys simply blows up(deletes) its garden.

    A good analogy is its in a room in a hotel on your system. If you want to get rid of it, you just clean out its room.

    A traditional application actually takes up residence in your house and moves stuff around and has full access. Its also harder to remove as only it knows all the things its added to your system.. so its responsible for cleaning up after itself when you call its uninstaller and tell it to leave.
    What you have described is a sand box. A walled garden is M$ will not allow any other APPs other than what they have approved to be installed on your system.
    The choice to only allow approved apps to use the walled garden is a corporate one(they also take a 30% cut of any sales and 20% if you sell over $25K). If Microsoft wanted to, they could open it up. The Walled Garden itself is put there more for security reasons and ease of uninstall. Right now, there is no app system on the market(even Android) that isn't open to where anybody can make any app they want. Google probably gives the most leeway, but put any app on the system they really don't like, and watch how long it lasts.

    Either way, Windows developers aren't 'over a barrel' in the same way as say.. Apple iOS users. Windows developers can continue to make and distribute normal applications as they always have. What this will lead to is a full-blown application being released, along with access to tiny 'free' apps that extend specific functionality to the mobile enviornment(and work as a marketing tool to sell the actual product), at no cost. Microsoft can take their 30% cut of nothing, and the Windows developers will continue to receive 100% of sales through their websites.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #28


    Quote Originally Posted by chrisa View Post

    The choice to only allow approved apps to use the walled garden is a corporate one(they also take a 30% cut of any sales and 20% if you sell over $25K). If Microsoft wanted to, they could open it up. The Walled Garden itself is put there more for security reasons and ease of uninstall. Right now, there is no app system on the market(even Android) that isn't open to where anybody can make any app they want. Google probably gives the most leeway, but put any app on the system they really don't like, and watch how long it lasts.

    Either way, Windows developers aren't 'over a barrel' in the same way as say.. Apple iOS users. Windows developers can continue to make and distribute normal applications as they always have. What this will lead to is a full-blown application being released, along with access to tiny 'free' apps that extend specific functionality to the mobile enviornment(and work as a marketing tool to sell the actual product), at no cost. Microsoft can take their 30% cut of nothing, and the Windows developers will continue to receive 100% of sales through their websites.
    That is until M$ tightens the screw like they tried to do with Office.
    Of course iPhone has jail break that they are always trying to plug and some one is always jail breaking it again why is that if the walled garden is good for you?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #29


    Posts : 302
    Windows 7 on the desktop, Windows 8 Surface Pro mobile


    Quote Originally Posted by labeeman View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by chrisa View Post

    The choice to only allow approved apps to use the walled garden is a corporate one(they also take a 30% cut of any sales and 20% if you sell over $25K). If Microsoft wanted to, they could open it up. The Walled Garden itself is put there more for security reasons and ease of uninstall. Right now, there is no app system on the market(even Android) that isn't open to where anybody can make any app they want. Google probably gives the most leeway, but put any app on the system they really don't like, and watch how long it lasts.

    Either way, Windows developers aren't 'over a barrel' in the same way as say.. Apple iOS users. Windows developers can continue to make and distribute normal applications as they always have. What this will lead to is a full-blown application being released, along with access to tiny 'free' apps that extend specific functionality to the mobile enviornment(and work as a marketing tool to sell the actual product), at no cost. Microsoft can take their 30% cut of nothing, and the Windows developers will continue to receive 100% of sales through their websites.
    That is until M$ tightens the screw like they tried to do with Office.
    Of course iPhone has jail break that they are always trying to plug and some one is always jail breaking it again why is that if the walled garden is good for you?
    Doesn't work that way, fortunately :>.

    Apps are one thing. Preventing full-blown Applications from being sold on the open market, so you can take a cut is another. Its like the difference between a short story or poem and a full-blown novel. For small stuff, the cut can be justified since you aren't really writing that much and can use them to get your work seen. For the large stuff, no. They would get beaten down hard by both the private sector and governmental bodies.. not to mention the mere suggestion of it would single-handedly spur a third-party open-source solution to fruition as the one great unknown when diving into the PC arena is whether or not you'll get the developers to come along with you. Trying to impose 'a take' on companies simply to sell their large development products?

    Yes, that would do it.

    In short, Microsoft is not that stupid. They know where their bread is buttered, and they're pretty much the only game in town atm for full-blown applications whose functionality simply can't be internetted or mobiled.

    And honestly, I think a primary reason Apple has left their PC lines out to rot is for exactly this reason. They don't get a cut.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #30


    Quote Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
    I suppose there is an appeal in living in a child like fantasy. It avoids dealing with the real world.

    Not sure I would like to be permanently in that state, though.
    Exactly my point. So when do you think you'll pull yourself out of it? When MS gives you your way? When you get over the fear that MS is out to steal your money or forcing you to do anything? When, pray tell us?

    You continue to have choices.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

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Things are looking up for Microsoft Success!!!
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