Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Will 90 percent of users always hate Windows 8?

  1. #151


    Posts : 5,360
    7/8/ubuntu/Linux Deepin


    I haven't tried that - I expect it will be for the esd version.

    Not clear if the download would work for oem product key.

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  2. #152


    I think that this is a paramount issue for all Win 8 detractors:

    Did you like my Salad Nicosia recipe ?

    Here' tonight' menu:

    chili recipe - Google Search


    Chili with red kidney beans and ground meat with red bell peppers, Chipoline onions, chili seasoning and several other seasonings.
    Last edited by wetibbe; 21 Mar 2013 at 07:32.
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  3. #153


    Posts : 59
    Win 8.1 Pro X64


    Quote Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
    I haven't tried that - I expect it will be for the esd version.

    Not clear if the download would work for oem product key.
    Hope this adds to the discussion....
    I also needed to source Win Installation media for a clean install.
    I didn't get the Win install disk from the source that is mentioned but I had to get it from a different source. (and ESD version - I believe). It successfully installed Win 8. However, I had to get my OEM product key using Belarc Advisor and then add a file called "PID.txt" to the "sources" directory on the install DVD.

    The contents of the PID.txt file are:
    [PID]
    Value=XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX

    (The Xs are your product key)

    Now why couldn't MS have made this a little easier!
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  4. #154


    Germany/Florida
    Posts : 4,514
    Vista and Win7


    It is always difficult to discuss likes and dislikes. If you don't like something, nothing on earth will convince you to buy or use it. And similar the other way around when you are really sold on something.

    Here is a little analogy I experienced a few years ago:

    I bought this Acura Legend Coupe. A marvel of engineering and fit and finish. Burgundy exterior and saddle (beige) leather interior and all the bells and whistles a car could have. It was expensive, but the specs were great so I expected to be all happy with it.

    After 1 year and only a few thousand miles I sold it with a big loss in money. - Why ??

    As I said, it was beautiful, but when you went on the Autobahn at high speed (say 120 - 130 MpH), the thing was performing like a stage couch. No straight line control, it would wobble all over the place and I felt very uncomfortable and insecure. And at low speeds, you would feel every pebble in the road.

    The Honda engineers apparently had not done their homework in the chassis department. A cheaper Citroen CX that I had before and a cheaper Mercedes that I had later would perform beautifully in the same situations.

    Lesson learned - if you don't like something, you don't want it. And it takes only one single feature to make you dislike the item despite all the wonderful specs.

    It also showed that a device that is not designed for the target audiance will no be accepted. In Germany we drive very fast - unlike in most countries which have speed limits. And if you are only allowed to go at 70 MpH, the Acura chassis would probably suffice.

    Same with our discussion here. Using the new UI on a tablet or touchscreen Ultrabook is probably fine. But the target audiance on desktops works differently and there the new UI is a pain.
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  5. #155


    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    It makes you wonder why any software company would make programs that allow you to configure and use Windows 8 like it was Windows 7. [sarcasm]I mean, no would want that.[/sarcasm]
    The truth is that people want news but with optional ways. I installed some customization apps that make my life a bit easier, and that's not a problem with Windows 8, just my way to go.
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  6. #156


    Gurgaon
    Posts : 56
    Windows 8.1 Single Language


    Those who have read this thread may also like to read the article "How I Learned to Stop Hating and Start Loving Windows 8" at How I Learned to Stop Hating and Start Loving Windows 8.

    It gives the other side of the picture.
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  7. #157


    Posts : 5,360
    7/8/ubuntu/Linux Deepin


    There is already a thread about that.

    Report for those who are not sure about Windows 8
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  8. #158


    Germany/Florida
    Posts : 4,514
    Vista and Win7


    Since I posted this thread and the one quoted above, I can only encourage you to read both. It is always good to see both sides of the coin.
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  9. #159


    Posts : 1,770
    Windows Phone 6, Windows CE 5, Windows Vista x32, Windows 7 x32/x64, Windows 8 x64


    Quote Originally Posted by whs View Post
    Since I posted this thread and the one quoted above, I can only encourage you to read both. It is always good to see both sides of the coin.
    I did read that article and he has not said or contradicted anything that those who have criticised the UI have said. He in fact admits that he doesn't use the MPI much at all, but uses desktop and taskbar shortcuts like most already do with Windows 7:

    Yes, the Start menu is gone, but is that really a problem? How many times do you really need to visit it each day? Sure, there are numerous programs I use throughout the day and I need to be able to access them whenever I need then, but this is where desktop and taskbar shortcuts come into play.

    When the time comes that I need to use an app that does not have a shortcut here, I still find that I don’t need to really make use of the Start screen. Hit the Windows key and start typing – in a second I’ve found the app I was looking for.
    In a way, he almost criticises the entire Windows 8 UI:

    But the real clincher with learning to love Windows 8 is understanding just how much time keyboard shortcuts will save you. Many people switching to Windows 8 have complained about the fact that it is awkward to navigate the mouse cursor to the hotspots at the corner of the screen to access the Start screen, Charms bar and app switcher.

    But in reality, there is no need to use them – there are keyboard shortcuts that can be used to access all of these areas of Windows more easily. Learn to keep your fingers on the keyboard rather than reaching for the mouse and you’ll probably find that things are just as quick and easy – if not quicker and easier – to achieve as they were in Windows 7 and earlier.

    There are very few Modern apps that appeal at the moment, so it is something of a rarity for me to drop out of desktop mode.
    But that presupposes that one wishes to learn keyboard shortcuts, something that power users have been doing for a long time.

    So at the end of the day, he's had to modify the way that he's used to working on a desktop, simply to overcome the things that he doesn't like about Windows 8. I don't see why anyone should have to do that.
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  10. #160


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by whs View Post
    Since I posted this thread and the one quoted above, I can only encourage you to read both. It is always good to see both sides of the coin.
    I did read that article and he has not said or contradicted anything that those who have criticised the UI have said. He in fact admits that he doesn't use the MPI much at all, but uses desktop and taskbar shortcuts like most already do with Windows 7:

    Yes, the Start menu is gone, but is that really a problem? How many times do you really need to visit it each day? Sure, there are numerous programs I use throughout the day and I need to be able to access them whenever I need then, but this is where desktop and taskbar shortcuts come into play.

    When the time comes that I need to use an app that does not have a shortcut here, I still find that I don’t need to really make use of the Start screen. Hit the Windows key and start typing – in a second I’ve found the app I was looking for.
    In a way, he almost criticises the entire Windows 8 UI:

    But the real clincher with learning to love Windows 8 is understanding just how much time keyboard shortcuts will save you. Many people switching to Windows 8 have complained about the fact that it is awkward to navigate the mouse cursor to the hotspots at the corner of the screen to access the Start screen, Charms bar and app switcher.

    But in reality, there is no need to use them – there are keyboard shortcuts that can be used to access all of these areas of Windows more easily. Learn to keep your fingers on the keyboard rather than reaching for the mouse and you’ll probably find that things are just as quick and easy – if not quicker and easier – to achieve as they were in Windows 7 and earlier.

    There are very few Modern apps that appeal at the moment, so it is something of a rarity for me to drop out of desktop mode.
    But that presupposes that one wishes to learn keyboard shortcuts, something that power users have been doing for a long time.

    So at the end of the day, he's had to modify the way that he's used to working on a desktop, simply to overcome the things that he doesn't like about Windows 8. I don't see why anyone should have to do that.
    At the end of every install of Windows 7 I did, I have to "overcome" things about the UI that I didn't like, such as a littered All Programs lists that groups EVERYTHING in a folder out of view, overly large window control buttons, thick and weird looking border padding, changing folder views, and such. I do roughly the same in 8, except I can quickly use File Explorer to clean up the Start Screen and All Apps pretty quickly over the start menu, MUCH less tedious clicking.
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Will 90 percent of users always hate Windows 8?
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