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Solved What makes a computer slow/fast?


lunix

New Member
Posts
44
#1
In general, what makes a computer slow? Considering its not any form of malware or having too many stuff installed.
By slow I mean, e.g., when youre playing a game and it takes a long time to switch to another window.

When I hear about it, RAM and processor are the first things that come to my mind, just from what I can remember people saying (I think?), but what could also be the reason for this? What needs to be upgraded to improve that? And can it improve when you upgrade only one of the components, or would you need to upgrade more than just one (could one of them be stopping the other one)?

Yes, it may be a total newbie question... :) Im a total newbie, upgrading my computer for the first time and I would like to understand how it works, at least a bit of it.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Intel 2GHz
    Motherboard
    Intel P35
    Memory
    2 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon HD5670

proudtobegreek

still learning
Power User
#2

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    W8 Pro 64bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Home...made ®
    CPU
    Intel i7 2600k
    Motherboard
    GA-Z68X-UD3P-B3
    Memory
    Corsair Vengeance 4x4Gb 1600 Mhz
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS GTX 680 DirectCU II SLI
    Sound Card
    onboard
    Monitor(s) Displays
    LG Flatron W2240S PN
    Screen Resolution
    1920X1080
    Hard Drives
    SanDisk Ultra Plus SATA 3 128GB X2

    Western Digital Caviar Blue 2x1TB + WD Caviar Black 1TB
    PSU
    Corsair RM 850 X
    Case
    Chieftec Dragon
    Cooling
    Thermalright Macho HR-02
    Keyboard
    Ivation mechanical backlit
    Mouse
    MS Optical 6000
    Internet Speed
    24 Mbps
    Browser
    Chrome
    Antivirus
    ESET NOD32 8.0.312.0

Nuccii

New Member
VIP Member
Guru
Canada

Posts
1,950
#3

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    windows 8.1 Update 1 Pro 64bit
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Pavillion H8-1202
    CPU
    I7-2600 @ 3.4 GHz
    Motherboard
    PEGATRON
    Memory
    8 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    NIVDIA GeForce GT 520
    Sound Card
    Realtek ALC656GR CODEC
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SyncMaster S22B350
    Screen Resolution
    1920X1080 32 bit color
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 850 EVO SSD 500GB
    Keyboard
    Razer Blackwidow Ultimate 2013
    Mouse
    Logitech M510

lunix

New Member
Posts
44
#4

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Intel 2GHz
    Motherboard
    Intel P35
    Memory
    2 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon HD5670

Coke Robot

New Member
Pro User
Gold Member
Posts
5,707
#6
These days, it's honestly due to hard drive seek times and fragmentation. It wasn't like it was 10 or more years ago where a better CPU or a better GPU or more RAM would fix performance issues. These days, it's incredibly common to see quad core CPUs, 4+ gigs of RAM, a real decent GPU (mGPU or dedicated graphics) all being ran by an 64 bit operating system.

The hard drive in most PCs since about 2005 are all SATA and that has a throughput (depending on if SATA I, II, or III) of about 600 MB/sec. A hard drive at best maybe can pull off 150 MB/sec, BARELY even saturating the bandwidth at all.

This is why when the Solid State Drive came out, it was a joy of euphoria because NOW there is a storage medium that can actually make SATA III look slow, hence why PCI-E SSDs are the top of the line for performance because SATA is too slow. When you run that modern quad core, 4+ gig RAM, a dedicated graphics card with 64 bit Windows, performance is stellar and solid every single boot.

Essentially, hard drives limit the modern PC's processing potential because it's only able to process at best 150 MB/sec of data at a time versus average 500+ MB/sec on a SSD; which allows the system to be put to more rigorous performance.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    ASUS
    CPU
    AMD FX 8320
    Motherboard
    Crosshair V Formula-Z
    Memory
    16 gig DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS R9 270
    Screen Resolution
    1440x900
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Seagate Barracuda (starting to hate Seagate)
    x2 3 TB Toshibas
    Windows 8.1 is installed on a SanDisk Ultra Plus 256 GB
    PSU
    OCZ 500 watt
    Case
    A current work in progres as I'll be building the physical case myself. It shall be fantastic.
    Cooling
    Arctic Cooler with 3 heatpipes
    Keyboard
    Logitech K750 wireless solar powered keyboard
    Mouse
    Microsoft Touch Mouse
    Browser
    Internet Explorer 11
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, but I might go back on KIS 2014

CountMike

Well-Known Member
VIP Member
Guru
Belgrade , Serbia

Posts
4,664
#7
There's many degrees of Slow-Fast, very relative it is.
One part is Hardware, Processor, memory, storage and not to forget OS too. Each one builds to other so nicely balanced system is best and fastest in it's category.
Other part, starting with OS is software, on any particular system some programs would execute very fast but other might drag like it will never finish.
Choosing computer by the software to use on it, is the first consideration which can make it seem fast or slow. Some SW needs as many cores as possible, other needs single thread speed, another would love whole bunch of memory and some depend on storage speed.
You can turn that around and start with hardware and than choose what SW you will run on it. There's SW that can seem to run just as fast on a relatively slow computer just as fast as on top of the line system and SW that will choke on the best one.
So, there is no such thing as fast or slow computer, it all depends what you are using it for.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Home made
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen7 2700x
    Motherboard
    Asus Prime x470 Pro
    Memory
    16GB Kingston 3600
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus strix 570 OC 4gb
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 960 evo 250GB
    Silicon Power V70 240GB SSD
    WD 1 TB Blue
    WD 2 TB Blue
    Bunch of backup HDDs.
    PSU
    Sharkoon, Silent Storm 660W
    Case
    Raidmax
    Cooling
    CCM Nepton 140xl
    Internet Speed
    40/2 Mbps
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    WD

lunix

New Member
Posts
44
#8
There's many degrees of Slow-Fast, very relative it is.
One part is Hardware, Processor, memory, storage and not to forget OS too. Each one builds to other so nicely balanced system is best and fastest in it's category.
Other part, starting with OS is software, on any particular system some programs would execute very fast but other might drag like it will never finish.
Choosing computer by the software to use on it, is the first consideration which can make it seem fast or slow. Some SW needs as many cores as possible, other needs single thread speed, another would love whole bunch of memory and some depend on storage speed.
You can turn that around and start with hardware and than choose what SW you will run on it. There's SW that can seem to run just as fast on a relatively slow computer just as fast as on top of the line system and SW that will choke on the best one.
So, there is no such thing as fast or slow computer, it all depends what you are using it for.
Thank you for your answer!
Oh, and - Serbia? Croatia here! ^^
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Intel 2GHz
    Motherboard
    Intel P35
    Memory
    2 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon HD5670

lunix

New Member
Posts
44
#9
These days, it's honestly due to hard drive seek times and fragmentation. It wasn't like it was 10 or more years ago where a better CPU or a better GPU or more RAM would fix performance issues. These days, it's incredibly common to see quad core CPUs, 4+ gigs of RAM, a real decent GPU (mGPU or dedicated graphics) all being ran by an 64 bit operating system.

The hard drive in most PCs since about 2005 are all SATA and that has a throughput (depending on if SATA I, II, or III) of about 600 MB/sec. A hard drive at best maybe can pull off 150 MB/sec, BARELY even saturating the bandwidth at all.

This is why when the Solid State Drive came out, it was a joy of euphoria because NOW there is a storage medium that can actually make SATA III look slow, hence why PCI-E SSDs are the top of the line for performance because SATA is too slow. When you run that modern quad core, 4+ gig RAM, a dedicated graphics card with 64 bit Windows, performance is stellar and solid every single boot.

Essentially, hard drives limit the modern PC's processing potential because it's only able to process at best 150 MB/sec of data at a time versus average 500+ MB/sec on a SSD; which allows the system to be put to more rigorous performance.
Thank you! :)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Intel 2GHz
    Motherboard
    Intel P35
    Memory
    2 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon HD5670

CountMike

Well-Known Member
VIP Member
Guru
Belgrade , Serbia

Posts
4,664
#10
There's many degrees of Slow-Fast, very relative it is.
One part is Hardware, Processor, memory, storage and not to forget OS too. Each one builds to other so nicely balanced system is best and fastest in it's category.
Other part, starting with OS is software, on any particular system some programs would execute very fast but other might drag like it will never finish.
Choosing computer by the software to use on it, is the first consideration which can make it seem fast or slow. Some SW needs as many cores as possible, other needs single thread speed, another would love whole bunch of memory and some depend on storage speed.
You can turn that around and start with hardware and than choose what SW you will run on it. There's SW that can seem to run just as fast on a relatively slow computer just as fast as on top of the line system and SW that will choke on the best one.
So, there is no such thing as fast or slow computer, it all depends what you are using it for.
Thank you for your answer!
Oh, and - Serbia? Croatia here! ^^
Hello neighbor, thinking of making new machine ?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Home made
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen7 2700x
    Motherboard
    Asus Prime x470 Pro
    Memory
    16GB Kingston 3600
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus strix 570 OC 4gb
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 960 evo 250GB
    Silicon Power V70 240GB SSD
    WD 1 TB Blue
    WD 2 TB Blue
    Bunch of backup HDDs.
    PSU
    Sharkoon, Silent Storm 660W
    Case
    Raidmax
    Cooling
    CCM Nepton 140xl
    Internet Speed
    40/2 Mbps
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    WD

alphanumeric

slightly off center
VIP Member
Guru
Gold Member
#11
Hello neighbor, thinking of making new machine ?
Looking at the OP's system specs, that may be the best suggestion. I'm thinking upgrade options will be limited so starting over may be a better option.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Education 64 Bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Asus
    CPU
    AMD Phenom II X4 980 Black Edition Deneb 3.7GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS M4N68T-M V2 µATX Motherboard
    Memory
    8GB 4GBx2 Kingston PC10600 DDR3 1333 Memory
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA Geforce GT640 2 Gig DDR3 PCIe
    Sound Card
    VIA VT1708s High Definition Audio 8-channel Onboard
    Monitor(s) Displays
    22" LG E2242 1080p and 2 19" I-INC AG191D
    Screen Resolution
    1280x1024 - 1920x1080 - 1280x1024
    Hard Drives
    Crucial MX100 256 GB SSD and 500 GB WD Blue SATA
    PSU
    Thermaltake TR 620
    Case
    Power Up Black ATX Mid-Tower Case
    Cooling
    Stock heatsink fan
    Keyboard
    Logitech Wireless K350 Wave
    Mouse
    Logitech M570 Trackball and T650 TouchPad
    Internet Speed
    80 Mbps Down 30 Mbps Up
    Browser
    Internet Explorer 11
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    HP DVD1040e Lightscribe - External USB2

alphanumeric

slightly off center
VIP Member
Guru
Gold Member
#12
These days, it's honestly due to hard drive seek times and fragmentation. It wasn't like it was 10 or more years ago where a better CPU or a better GPU or more RAM would fix performance issues. These days, it's incredibly common to see quad core CPUs, 4+ gigs of RAM, a real decent GPU (mGPU or dedicated graphics) all being ran by an 64 bit operating system.

The hard drive in most PCs since about 2005 are all SATA and that has a throughput (depending on if SATA I, II, or III) of about 600 MB/sec. A hard drive at best maybe can pull off 150 MB/sec, BARELY even saturating the bandwidth at all.

This is why when the Solid State Drive came out, it was a joy of euphoria because NOW there is a storage medium that can actually make SATA III look slow, hence why PCI-E SSDs are the top of the line for performance because SATA is too slow. When you run that modern quad core, 4+ gig RAM, a dedicated graphics card with 64 bit Windows, performance is stellar and solid every single boot.

Essentially, hard drives limit the modern PC's processing potential because it's only able to process at best 150 MB/sec of data at a time versus average 500+ MB/sec on a SSD; which allows the system to be put to more rigorous performance.
:ditto: If the pause/delay is when loading the next screen, its the hard drive slowing things down. If its a mechanical drive whether its SATA I, II, or III doesn't really factor into it much. Like Coke Robot says, the guts inside can't go much more than 150 MB/sec, if that. Not unless its a 10,000 RPM Raptor or similar. Your other specs are a bit on the low side so they will factor into it also. They will slow down your FPS more than load times though.

The cheapest bang for your buck is more RAM or faster speed RAM. It all depends on what your motherboard can support. If you want to upgrade versus starting over updating the RAM is where to start, IMHO. If your motherboard supports SATA II or III an SSD would be a good investment. I put one in my older desktop PC and it was like I bought a new PC. If your motherboard only supports SATA I it may not be worth the investment though. The low speed of that interface will cripple an SSD.

If you buy new upgrades buy stuff that could also be used in a new PC if you latter decide to build one. A PCIe video card could easily be moved to a new build for instance. So could an SSD.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Education 64 Bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Asus
    CPU
    AMD Phenom II X4 980 Black Edition Deneb 3.7GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS M4N68T-M V2 µATX Motherboard
    Memory
    8GB 4GBx2 Kingston PC10600 DDR3 1333 Memory
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA Geforce GT640 2 Gig DDR3 PCIe
    Sound Card
    VIA VT1708s High Definition Audio 8-channel Onboard
    Monitor(s) Displays
    22" LG E2242 1080p and 2 19" I-INC AG191D
    Screen Resolution
    1280x1024 - 1920x1080 - 1280x1024
    Hard Drives
    Crucial MX100 256 GB SSD and 500 GB WD Blue SATA
    PSU
    Thermaltake TR 620
    Case
    Power Up Black ATX Mid-Tower Case
    Cooling
    Stock heatsink fan
    Keyboard
    Logitech Wireless K350 Wave
    Mouse
    Logitech M570 Trackball and T650 TouchPad
    Internet Speed
    80 Mbps Down 30 Mbps Up
    Browser
    Internet Explorer 11
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    HP DVD1040e Lightscribe - External USB2

lunix

New Member
Posts
44
#13
There's many degrees of Slow-Fast, very relative it is.
One part is Hardware, Processor, memory, storage and not to forget OS too. Each one builds to other so nicely balanced system is best and fastest in it's category.
Other part, starting with OS is software, on any particular system some programs would execute very fast but other might drag like it will never finish.
Choosing computer by the software to use on it, is the first consideration which can make it seem fast or slow. Some SW needs as many cores as possible, other needs single thread speed, another would love whole bunch of memory and some depend on storage speed.
You can turn that around and start with hardware and than choose what SW you will run on it. There's SW that can seem to run just as fast on a relatively slow computer just as fast as on top of the line system and SW that will choke on the best one.
So, there is no such thing as fast or slow computer, it all depends what you are using it for.
Thank you for your answer!
Oh, and - Serbia? Croatia here! ^^
Hello neighbor, thinking of making new machine ?
Pa nadam se, da :) Upisujem informatički faks a i treba mi za igrice. :)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Intel 2GHz
    Motherboard
    Intel P35
    Memory
    2 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon HD5670

lunix

New Member
Posts
44
#14

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Intel 2GHz
    Motherboard
    Intel P35
    Memory
    2 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon HD5670

lunix

New Member
Posts
44
#15
These days, it's honestly due to hard drive seek times and fragmentation. It wasn't like it was 10 or more years ago where a better CPU or a better GPU or more RAM would fix performance issues. These days, it's incredibly common to see quad core CPUs, 4+ gigs of RAM, a real decent GPU (mGPU or dedicated graphics) all being ran by an 64 bit operating system.

The hard drive in most PCs since about 2005 are all SATA and that has a throughput (depending on if SATA I, II, or III) of about 600 MB/sec. A hard drive at best maybe can pull off 150 MB/sec, BARELY even saturating the bandwidth at all.

This is why when the Solid State Drive came out, it was a joy of euphoria because NOW there is a storage medium that can actually make SATA III look slow, hence why PCI-E SSDs are the top of the line for performance because SATA is too slow. When you run that modern quad core, 4+ gig RAM, a dedicated graphics card with 64 bit Windows, performance is stellar and solid every single boot.

Essentially, hard drives limit the modern PC's processing potential because it's only able to process at best 150 MB/sec of data at a time versus average 500+ MB/sec on a SSD; which allows the system to be put to more rigorous performance.
:ditto: If the pause/delay is when loading the next screen, its the hard drive slowing things down. If its a mechanical drive whether its SATA I, II, or III doesn't really factor into it much. Like Coke Robot says, the guts inside can't go much more than 150 MB/sec, if that. Not unless its a 10,000 RPM Raptor or similar. Your other specs are a bit on the low side so they will factor into it also. They will slow down your FPS more than load times though.

The cheapest bang for your buck is more RAM or faster speed RAM. It all depends on what your motherboard can support. If you want to upgrade versus starting over updating the RAM is where to start, IMHO. If your motherboard supports SATA II or III an SSD would be a good investment. I put one in my older desktop PC and it was like I bought a new PC. If your motherboard only supports SATA I it may not be worth the investment though. The low speed of that interface will cripple an SSD.

If you buy new upgrades buy stuff that could also be used in a new PC if you latter decide to build one. A PCIe video card could easily be moved to a new build for instance. So could an SSD.
Makes sense. :) Thank you!
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Intel 2GHz
    Motherboard
    Intel P35
    Memory
    2 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon HD5670

TechnoMage

Active Member
Power User
Central Florida

Posts
389
#16
It's sometimes quite amazing with what you (or I) can do with a PC that looks like it came over on the Mayflower.

I built my own Desktop, in 2005 and it will run off and hide from many of the new PC's today, with an AMD Athlon, X2, 5200+ cpu.

I have an old eMachine, vintage 2006, that's running Windows 7 Ultimate/32 and doing all my Graphics for me, with an AMD Athlon, X2, 3000+, cpu.

Many of the older processors are still very capable today, if properly set up and with an OS that's tweaked and tuned to run on them.

I was given a Dell laptop, vintage 2006, that had XP Home as its original OS, that's running Windows 8.1 Pro/32 like it just came out of the factory.

The OP's spec's are not anything I don't see every day in my computer business, but with lots of TLC, that computer can be made to run very well indeed. Maybe just a few new parts, will overcome a few inherent limitations.

Then there are a few simple performance tweaks that can practically double a PC's efficiency (speed). Windows is a horrible OS for performance, with all its built in Safe-Defaults.

The Commodore 64 was likewise riddled with Safe-Defaults.....so I re-wrote that OS and then the little C-64 became a pretty nice little computer, for an 8 bit machine. I was sad to see Commodore go out of business.

Sorry for the walk down memory lane.

TechnoMage :cool:
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win-8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Gigabyte
    CPU
    AMD 8 Core
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte
    Memory
    PNY, 4GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA, GForce 210
    Monitor(s) Displays
    21" HP
    Hard Drives
    Seagate SATA III, 500GB
    PSU
    Antec Earthwatts, 650
    Case
    Pac-Man Case
    Keyboard
    HP Professional
    Mouse
    GearHead Wireless
    Internet Speed
    5 Meg
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    AVG Free
    Other Info
    Using Classic Shell on Win-8.1 pro

CountMike

Well-Known Member
VIP Member
Guru
Belgrade , Serbia

Posts
4,664
#17
Actually, it's games that need faster and more powerful computers mostly. Many ask me about which kind of computer they need and when asked what they need ti for the answer is," Well, you know... just for internet and for kids to play games, nothing special" than I have trouble explaining that "Just for kids to play games" part is what's going to cost them double. You can crunch a giant spreadsheet in one second on a single core computer and built in video card with 2 GB RAM, but just try any new game and it would not even start or be usable on it. Even Youtube videos need a 2core @2GHz nowadays.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Home made
    CPU
    AMD Ryzen7 2700x
    Motherboard
    Asus Prime x470 Pro
    Memory
    16GB Kingston 3600
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus strix 570 OC 4gb
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 960 evo 250GB
    Silicon Power V70 240GB SSD
    WD 1 TB Blue
    WD 2 TB Blue
    Bunch of backup HDDs.
    PSU
    Sharkoon, Silent Storm 660W
    Case
    Raidmax
    Cooling
    CCM Nepton 140xl
    Internet Speed
    40/2 Mbps
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    WD

pcRat

New Member
Power User
#18
I think jumping up to something like a Core 2 Duo E6550 2.33GHz CPU would increase your computer performance.
Several my friends have been buying these with satisfaction. 1 had PC-6400 DDR2 RAM and the rest of them have PC-5300 DDR2 RAM.
Some friends upgrade them to Windows 8 without a problem. The others like Windows 7 or can't afford to upgrade.
Windows 7 64 - bit comes installed on this motherboard which allows you to increase the ram up to 8 GB.


Lenovo M57 Desktop PC - Intel Core 2 Duo E6550 2.33GHz, 2GB Memory, 80GB HDD, DVD, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit (Off-Lease) $129

More Refurbished
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    i7-3770K
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z77 Extreme4
    Memory
    16 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    onboard
    Monitor(s) Displays
    17" 24"
    Hard Drives
    1 TB WD
    PSU
    550w

lunix

New Member
Posts
44
#19
It's sometimes quite amazing with what you (or I) can do with a PC that looks like it came over on the Mayflower.

I built my own Desktop, in 2005 and it will run off and hide from many of the new PC's today, with an AMD Athlon, X2, 5200+ cpu.

I have an old eMachine, vintage 2006, that's running Windows 7 Ultimate/32 and doing all my Graphics for me, with an AMD Athlon, X2, 3000+, cpu.

Many of the older processors are still very capable today, if properly set up and with an OS that's tweaked and tuned to run on them.

I was given a Dell laptop, vintage 2006, that had XP Home as its original OS, that's running Windows 8.1 Pro/32 like it just came out of the factory.

The OP's spec's are not anything I don't see every day in my computer business, but with lots of TLC, that computer can be made to run very well indeed. Maybe just a few new parts, will overcome a few inherent limitations.

Then there are a few simple performance tweaks that can practically double a PC's efficiency (speed). Windows is a horrible OS for performance, with all its built in Safe-Defaults.

The Commodore 64 was likewise riddled with Safe-Defaults.....so I re-wrote that OS and then the little C-64 became a pretty nice little computer, for an 8 bit machine. I was sad to see Commodore go out of business.

Sorry for the walk down memory lane.

TechnoMage :cool:
No, I thank you for this, things like that are always nice to hear :) Although I think you do need to know a bit more than an average user to make it all work. I myself dont though. :D
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Intel 2GHz
    Motherboard
    Intel P35
    Memory
    2 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon HD5670

lunix

New Member
Posts
44
#20
Actually, it's games that need faster and more powerful computers mostly. Many ask me about which kind of computer they need and when asked what they need ti for the answer is," Well, you know... just for internet and for kids to play games, nothing special" than I have trouble explaining that "Just for kids to play games" part is what's going to cost them double. You can crunch a giant spreadsheet in one second on a single core computer and built in video card with 2 GB RAM, but just try any new game and it would not even start or be usable on it. Even Youtube videos need a 2core @2GHz nowadays.
Understandable :)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Intel 2GHz
    Motherboard
    Intel P35
    Memory
    2 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon HD5670

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