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Microsoft Office 2010 to 2013 upgrade offer.


ddadda82

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#1
I have a qualifying copy of Office 2010 Home and Small Business.

Recently I just claimed the offer. But how about the old copy? Will it be invalidated instantly if I install the 2013 version? I'm not sure if I will like my 2013, so would like the ability to go back to 2010 if possible.
 

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ddadda82

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#3
Yeah, that's kinda sad and draconian move by Microsoft. I like them but it's getting irritating lately.
 

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#4
What I don't quite understand are the technicalities of 'licencing', according to Microsoft. If you purchase a copy of Office 2013, you purchase a licence to use it on one PC and not transferable. If you purchase a copy of Office 365, you purchase a licence to use it on five PCs and transferable (get rid of an old PC and buy a new PC and transfer the licence). So when is a licence not a licence?

Office 2013 is defined as a licence: Microsoft Software License Agreement - Office.com

Office 365 is defined as a licence: Microsoft Software License Terms for Office - Office.com
 

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pparks1

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#5
A EULA (end user license agrement) can say anything it wants. You don't own the software, you get the right to use that software in a manner dictated by the manufacturer of said software. If they want to make 1 version not transferable, and 1 version that is transferable they have the right to do so. You, as the consumer have the right to not agree to those terms and thus not use the software.
 

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#6
A EULA (end user license agrement) can say anything it wants. You don't own the software, you get the right to use that software in a manner dictated by the manufacturer of said software. If they want to make 1 version not transferable, and 1 version that is transferable they have the right to do so. You, as the consumer have the right to not agree to those terms and thus not use the software.
I understand that, but there are two issues here. Firstly, you don't really get to read the EULA until you've unpackaged and started to install the software. Secondly, it'll be interesting how this stands up in the various courts of different countries. They are both licences and it's the transferability issue that I'm sure will be contested.
 

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pparks1

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#7
Firstly, you don't really get to read the EULA until you've unpackaged and started to install the software.
Directly from the Office 2010 Home and Student EULA. If you don't agree with the EULA, you will get a refund.
BY USING THE SOFTWARE, YOU ACCEPT THESE TERMS. IF YOU DO NOT ACCEPT THEM, DO NOT USE THE SOFTWARE. INSTEAD, RETURN IT TO THE RETAILER FOR A REFUND OR
CREDIT. If you cannot obtain a refund there, contact Microsoft or the Microsoft affiliate serving your
country for information about Microsoft’s refund policies. See Microsoft Worldwide Home. In the
United States and Canada, call (800) MICROSOFT or see Microsoft North American Retail Product Refund Guidelines.
Secondly, it'll be interesting how this stands up in the various courts of different countries. They are both licences and it's the transferability issue that I'm sure will be contested.
Legally, the EULA can be different in different countries. What applies to me, may not apply to you.

But people need to read that text before they hit "I Agree". Because otherwise, they have agreed and they don't really have much of a leg to stand on.
 

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#8
Firstly, you don't really get to read the EULA until you've unpackaged and started to install the software.
Directly from the Office 2010 Home and Student EULA. If you don't agree with the EULA, you will get a refund.
BY USING THE SOFTWARE, YOU ACCEPT THESE TERMS. IF YOU DO NOT ACCEPT THEM, DO NOT USE THE SOFTWARE. INSTEAD, RETURN IT TO THE RETAILER FOR A REFUND OR
CREDIT. If you cannot obtain a refund there, contact Microsoft or the Microsoft affiliate serving your
country for information about Microsoft’s refund policies. See Microsoft Worldwide Home. In the
United States and Canada, call (800) MICROSOFT or see Microsoft North American Retail Product Refund Guidelines.
Secondly, it'll be interesting how this stands up in the various courts of different countries. They are both licences and it's the transferability issue that I'm sure will be contested.
Legally, the EULA can be different in different countries. What applies to me, may not apply to you.

But people need to read that text before they hit "I Agree". Because otherwise, they have agreed and they don't really have much of a leg to stand on.
Very, very, few people read the legal blurb. Many wouldn't even understand what it meant, unless someone experienced explained it to them. To date it hasn't been an issue, because you've always been able to install the software onto a new computer. As I said, it'll be interesting to see how this pans out, outside the US.
 

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IanS100

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#9
ddadda82: I took advantage of the 2010 - 2013 offer & the upgrade left the fully functioning Office 2010 where it was & simply installed 2013, so I can use either as I wish unfortunately, yet again the shortcuts & Macros don't simply port across so it took me half a day of faffing about to get them back again.
 

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pparks1

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#10
Very, very, few people read the legal blurb. Many wouldn't even understand what it meant, unless someone experienced explained it to them.
Nobody reads it, I know that. But that doesn't mean they get off scott free. People need to be accountable for their actions and it's something that frankly nobody does anymore. Nobody ever thinks anything is there fault.

And yes, this is a shocking change to the agreement and one that I missed for quite some time. That's why I started a thread on this very topic on this forum. I warned my friends and colleagues about the change on Facebook. I even drafted an email to all employees at my company explaining the ramifications of the this new licensing agreement and took the time to explain to them what Office 365 was.

Frankly, MS has done the worlds most piddle poor marketing of all time on Office 365. Everybody thinks its "Office in the cloud". Nobody has a flipping clue what it even entails, or how it works. Even hardcore techies on this site threw up their hands and said, "I'm not running office in the cloud".
 

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#11
I had a look at the Microsoft site that covers Office 365 (Office 365 is Secure, Anywhere Access to Your Online Office). Lot's of advertising blurb, but not a lot of real info as to how it all actually works. All that is very clear is that Microsoft wants to host everything that you do. It's almost like Oracle of years gone by that tried over and over to introduce thin client to every organisation, which Microsoft resisted vehemently, and now Microsoft seems to want deliver everything over today's thin client, the internet.
 

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pparks1

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#12
And this is a prime example of the bad advertising on their part. They aren't "hosting" anything other than the software download. You buy the software via a subscription model, you download the software and install it locally on up to 5 computers. You can optionally save files to the cloud or to your local drive. Their isn't any cloud requirement at all aside from fact that you cannot buy the software in a store, but have to download it.
 

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#13
And this is a prime example of the bad advertising on their part. They aren't "hosting" anything other than the software download. You buy the software via a subscription model, you download the software and install it locally on up to 5 computers. You can optionally save files to the cloud or to your local drive. Their isn't any cloud requirement at all aside from fact that you cannot buy the software in a store, but have to download it.
But note that they provide a set amount of storage space in Skydrive (or whatever it is) and that is the default location for all of your files. So when the average Jill/Joe installs 365 and signs in (which clearly you must), everything goes to the Microsoft servers, unless you know to direct otherwise. People may not even know that things they save are not stored on their PC, because the interface may look like it is. Even that link I provided is as clear as mud as to how things work.
 

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pparks1

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#14
It's extremely easy to change from saving to Skydrive to your local drive. And for anybody who can manage to download and install Office 365, this won't be a challenge. And saving files to Skydrive isn't necessarily a bad thing. It's probably far better backup protected their their own home pc.
 

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#15
It's extremely easy to change from saving to Skydrive to your local drive. And for anybody who can manage to download and install Office 365, this won't be a challenge. And saving files to Skydrive isn't necessarily a bad thing. It's probably far better backup protected their their own home pc.
Yes, if you are aware. We don't really know how people are going to buy Office 365 just yet. Maybe it can be bought with a new PC and you just sign on at first connection. It's in Microsoft's interest to make this as seamless and invisible as possible.
 

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#16
I just found this thread and found myself captured by the eloquent, articulate and very respectful debate of pparks1 and Ray8 on the EULA and License's of Software from Microsoft. I commend you two, well done.
 

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TeleFragger

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#17
wow now i have to go read the license agreement..

i however got lucky and was able to buy Office 2013 pro, visio 2013 pro and publisher 2013 pro for $10 each through my company...
I was told.. and yes I need to verify.. that each can be installed on 1 desktop and 1 laptop....
oh and also i got windows 8 pro from our msdn subscription as my boss said we will never run it at work so I can use one... hah...
 

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