Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Dell, HP Say Windows 8 Is Trashing PC Sales

  1. #1


    Scotland
    Posts : 192
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64

    Dell, HP Say Windows 8 Is Trashing PC Sales


    To hear Dell and HP tell it, the slump in PC sales can be blamed in part on Windows 8, which won't do much to improve the situation until sometime next year.

    During conference calls this week to talk about their earnings both Dell and HP pointed to lousy PC sales as a problem. Dell actually came out and said Windows 8 anticipation had resellers drawing down PC inventory, but also acknowledged that any benefit the new operating system will have on sales would be delayed into next year.
    Source

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #2


    Well I think to really know if it really is their fault they have to wait until it's in stores and on the computers for people to try out. As much as I don't agree with windows 8's execution. It does add stuff I would want if I actually owned a touch screen. For example a lot of the touch screens are annoyingly slow when the touch enabled programs were built by HP and Dell themselves. Although I can't speak much for the apps as I can't get the camera app to work. Music isn't that bad just needs to pick up more of the Zune software's beauty(before it went overly flat) Video, games and music all look like a going green campaign which is nice to tie in with XBox but not that great looks-wise. Frankly Dell and HP themselves don't innovate their products. There was really only one nicely designed all in one from HP and I believe it didn't even have a good processor their designs are horrible especially with that beats audio stuff. HP makes decently looking laptops sometimes. Dell makes clean stuff that basically looks exactly like the year before and the year before that. It's nice but some of their products need some innovation. They can't jut blame windows 8 which is not as bad compared to what you probably will end up using the operating system on. Which is probably a badly designed HP or Dell computer. Unless you build your own. They need to work on their own products. It shouldn't be all up to the operating system. You have to create better products first.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #3


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    If they're talking about desktop PCs, of course it will. But then again, the news has been around that desktop PCs aren't selling as hugely as they used to. Laptops are, and soon tablet PCs will too. That is, if they decide to start building touch AIO PCs...
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #4


    Posts : 299
    win 7 home premium 64 bit


    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    If they're talking about desktop PCs, of course it will. But then again, the news has been around that desktop PCs aren't selling as hugely as they used to. Laptops are, and soon tablet PCs will too. That is, if they decide to start building touch AIO PCs...

    The point you are missing, "Steve" is that most desktop users tend to keep a unit longer because it can be upgraded with ease and at reasonable cost, consumers do this as do businesses. The bottom line is that they are built to last longer by way of upgrades and robustness. It isn't that people don't like them anymore.

    AIO PCs are not a good value, you do know we are in a recession (we never
    recovered from it) and cost and value are at the top of the list for many consumers
    (ahem except for Apple customers ) and not many desktop users will bother with using touch except for the initial novelty of it. After a while your arms will get tired, and your screen will get scuzzy with grease and other crap.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #5


    Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts : 6,490
    Windows 10 Education 64 Bit


    An AIO would be at the bottom of my list of computing devices I'd like to own. I'd sooner buy a touch screen monitor for my existing desktop, than a giant tablet PC with no battery that's anchored to a wall outlet. Add in the laptop like motherboard, that isn't upgradable, and it doesn't seem like a good value to me? They are nice and compact, and look nice, compared to your normal desktop PC. I'll take the normal desktop PC any day though, for all the reasons Legacy7955 mentioned.


    Times are tough so I'm not surprised sales are down. I also think most families already have and don't necessarily need another desktop PC. That new computing device the kid needs is more than likely going to be a laptop or tablet. Those markets will eventually saturate too. While I would love to have a tablet or Ultrabook, I don't think I'll ever be without at least one good quality desktop PC. It's just to much fun assembling the parts and slowly upgrading it as time and finances permit.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #6


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    I should say that if the desktop market is doing well, laptop sales wouldn't be. But that isn't the case. Yes, a desktop has more value to it and theoretically, people are upgrading parts to make it last longer. As for laptops not being of value as you can't upgrade parts so easily, that doesn't seems to resonate with most people. If it has a decent processor, 4 gigs of RAM, a good graphics chip and ample hard drive space, that laptop will be used for years. As for AIO PCs, true, you can't upgrade a whole lot, but there still is some value to be had. I was looking around and for a higher end tradition tower and an AIO PC of almost similar specs, even with touch, is still within the same price bracket as the tower. Even better yet, Intel is working on making the AIO form factor more upgradeable by building different parts specific to the AIO form factor. For example, the motherboard of one will just be the host for add on boards like normal, except that one could swap out a PCB board with an Atom processor and low end Northbridge chip to an i7 processor and Intel's Sandy Bridge. Pretty simple I'd say.



    There's innovation to be had with it that will bring AIO PCs more value that only a tower has.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #7


    Quote Originally Posted by legacy7955 View Post
    The point you are missing, "Steve" is that most desktop users tend to keep a unit longer because it can be upgraded with ease and at reasonable cost, consumers do this as do businesses. The bottom line is that they are built to last longer by way of upgrades and robustness. It isn't that people don't like them anymore.
    Yeah, my home desktop computer was built in June of 2009 and is now 3 years old. But for my needs it's a complete beast. Quad core intel, 12MB L3 cache, overclocked,8GB RAM, Nvidia gtx570 video card (1,280MB), 80GB Intel SSD, and 1TB WD Caviar Black.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #8


    Adelaide
    Posts : 1,338
    Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Linux Mint 17.1 MATE (64 bit)


    My desktop's box is ~8 years old (including the power supply).

    It's "seen off":

    • 3 MBs (2 died and one is ancient)
    • 4 graphics cards (2 died and 2 are ancient)
    • 3 HDDs (1 died, 1 is ancient and the other is in storage)
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #9


    DeLand, FL
    Posts : 380
    Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit


    Quote Originally Posted by echrada View Post
    To hear Dell and HP tell it, the slump in PC sales can be blamed in part on Windows 8, which won't do much to improve the situation until sometime next year.

    During conference calls this week to talk about their earnings both Dell and HP pointed to lousy PC sales as a problem. Dell actually came out and said Windows 8 anticipation had resellers drawing down PC inventory, but also acknowledged that any benefit the new operating system will have on sales would be delayed into next year.
    Source
    Well, I tried to help Dell out last month when I bought my new Inspiron 17R. Great machine, this.

    -Max
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #10


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    The desktop I had before my new rebuild was a Dell Dimension 4550 that went through two motherboards and P4 processors and a hard drive. I used it for a good seven or so years until Windows 7 came out (odd numerology on that one). Then I decided one must rebuild. I rebuilt the case so it looks nicer and has new parts. Now, I decided that with Windows 8 and Grand Theft Automobile 5 will be coming out, one must rebuild.

    And my rebuild will be essentially future proofing myself for a good five years at least; this is what I'm planning on right now: a new AMD APU quad core Trinity processor (might be overclocking it) with its Radeon 7000 series graphics chip in CrossFire with a Radeon 6990 (if I can flippin' find one and one built by ASUS ), probably 16 gigs of AMD built RAM as DDR3 is still rather dirt cheap than the last time I rebuilt my system, an ASUS mobo, a 128 gig SSD, eight 4 TB hard drives in RAID 5, two internal 2.5" hard drive bays, two external 2.5" ports, an external SATA connection for a 3.5" hard drive or my DVD drive that I'll be building an external enclosure for, a wifi card, a TV tuner, probably a dedicated RAID card, and to top it all off, the case is undergoing renovations so it looks even more sleeker, simpler, a little strange and totally different than anything out there (kind of like Windows 8 ).

    Aw yeah.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Dell, HP Say Windows 8 Is Trashing PC Sales
Related Threads
Source A Guy
Windows 8.1 is a winner, but PC sales will plummet, says Gartner | Computerworld Blogs
Dell replays Windows 8 blame card as PC sales slide - Computerworld
Source Some interesting reading. . .;) Thanks Brink. Just cannot remember how to do posting anymore. . .:)
Solved HDD constantly trashing in Drivers & Hardware
Hi, I've recently installed Windows 8 on an Asus X201E. There is an audiable constant disk trashing, although the HDD LED doesn't blink & the Performance monitor in the task manager also doesn't indicate any excessive disk access (literally 0% when nothing is going on). What could cause this?...
Eight Forums Android App Eight Forums IOS App Follow us on Facebook