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Windows 8 in the Enterprise: Why IT pros say no

  1. #1


    Bay Area
    Posts : 21,837
    Windows 7 Home Premium x64

    Windows 8 in the Enterprise: Why IT pros say no


    We surveyed 50 tech pros via Google plus, as well as 15 tech pros from large enterprises at the geek site I run about whether they were gearing up for a Windows 8 switch.

    Out of 50 tech pros I interviewed at enterprises around the world, 41 said they had no plans to bring in Windows 8 because of learning curve issues. Many are racing to upgrade XP systems to Windows 7 now and Windows 7 sales are as brisk, or brisker, than ever - the opposite of what typically happens before a major OS release comes out.
    Source

    A Guy

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  2. #2


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    I just want to say that I think it's so weird that people have issues with previous Windows UIs when boiled down, it's just the same thing but made prettier. There's not a whole lot of learning curve.

    Having said that, yes, Windows 8 is a learning curve. But, I bet this is something that will go forward for at least this decade and a half with new improvements making it better, much like what happened after Windows 95. To me, I would think it could take a month for someone to get fully acquainted and familiar with Windows 8. One month of downtime to learn a new OS that will potentially be the basis of Windows for at least a decade? A very pale thing. Also pale, comparing Windows 8 to vista or ME isn't even the same ballpark.....
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  3. #3


    Coke: "One month of downtime to learn a new OS that will potentially be the basis of Windows for at least a decade?"

    It is OK for you working in your parent's basement at their expense to spend a month learning something new. It is quite another thing for an enterprise to have a month's downtime for its employees to come up to speed so they can do exactly what they were doing before but at a net loss.

    One man month costs an enterprise in the order of $10,000 in direct costs and at least three to five times that in lost productivity. If 1000 employes spend one month of lost productivity, that adds up to four to six MILLION dollars off the bottom line. THAT is why professional IT types are so very sensitive to learning curves and why enterprises are so slow updating systems that are getting the work done. Learning curves are expensive when value is added and must be very carefully planned and executed. It is obscenely expensive when absolutely no value is added and executed simply because it is the newest thing on the block.
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  4. #4


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by Lionell View Post
    Coke: "One month of downtime to learn a new OS that will potentially be the basis of Windows for at least a decade?"

    It is OK for you working in your parent's basement at their expense to spend a month learning something new. It is quite another thing for an enterprise to have a month's downtime for its employees to come up to speed so they can do exactly what they were doing before but at a net loss.

    One man month costs an enterprise in the order of $10,000 in direct costs and at least three to five times that in lost productivity. If 1000 employes spend one month of lost productivity, that adds up to four to six MILLION dollars off the bottom line. THAT is why professional IT types are so very sensitive to learning curves and why enterprises are so slow updating systems that are getting the work done. Learning curves are expensive when value is added and must be very carefully planned and executed. It is obscenely expensive when absolutely no value is added and executed simply because it is the newest thing on the block.
    First off, wow, very bold assumption on your behalf as you do not know me.

    Secondly, wow, very general assumption over a large swath of the enterprise.

    Thirdly, I know IT types are sensitive to user leaning curves. In fact, I used to work at the hospital in my area doing data entry. The IT people there absolutely REFUSED to transition from xp to 7 because over the fact that Office 2007 caused a learning curve; even though that was years ago and people I know there have gotten used to and wouldn't go back to Office 2003.

    Now, to say that going to the newest thing on the block isn't always value added, well, you don't say? If that were so, everyone would still be using xp and wouldn't be going to 7. If that were so, people would still be using Office 2003 and file based UIs instead of the Ribbon based versions. Enterprises will generally always do wave upgrades and do bits at a time over the course of a span of time as to minimize initial costs. Do you think it's really worth having to upgrade from xp to 7 in the enterprise? When the current systems and software are working fine, what's the point? If it involves an initial learning curve, some initial down time, and initial costs and downtime supporting the new OS, then why even do it?
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  5. #5


    Thanks for the article lead, Bill.

    First off, wow, very bold assumption on your behalf as you do not know me.

    Secondly, wow, very general assumption over a large swath of the enterprise.

    Thirdly, I know IT types are sensitive to user leaning curves. In fact, I used to work at the hospital in my area doing data entry. The IT people there absolutely REFUSED to transition from xp to 7 because over the fact that Office 2007 caused a learning curve; even though that was years ago and people I know there have gotten used to and wouldn't go back to Office 2003.

    Now, to say that going to the newest thing on the block isn't always value added, well, you don't say? If that were so, everyone would still be using xp and wouldn't be going to 7. If that were so, people would still be using Office 2003 and file based UIs instead of the Ribbon based versions. Enterprises will generally always do wave upgrades and do bits at a time over the course of a span of time as to minimize initial costs. Do you think it's really worth having to upgrade from xp to 7 in the enterprise? When the current systems and software are working fine, what's the point? If it involves an initial learning curve, some initial down time, and initial costs and downtime supporting the new OS, then why even do it?
    Ditto and a half, Cokie! 'At a boy! Stand your ground! I feel some of these Win 7ers are posting crap lately. They think they will save the world from what they perceive as Vista 8. Also, perhaps they all should of stuck with Windows 95. That had all of the basic enterprise programs needed.

    One man month costs an enterprise in the order of $10,000 in direct costs and at least three to five times that in lost productivity. If 1000 employes spend one month of lost productivity, that adds up to four to six MILLION dollars off the bottom line. THAT is why professional IT types are so very sensitive to learning curves and why enterprises are so slow updating systems that are getting the work done. Learning curves are expensive when value is added and must be very carefully planned and executed. It is obscenely expensive when absolutely no value is added and executed simply because it is the newest thing on the block.
    Lionell. I'm not IT nor a Pro in computing. I own a small building business. Because of the economy and my age (for I am nearing retirement) I'm down to 3 employees - Me, myself, and I. Although I use a PC for business, I don't consider myself a power user either. I'm a hobbyist like so many other members of the forum.

    Not much info in your profile as to who you are and your career other than Windows 7 as an OS. I'll assume you work IT because the statements you posted here and others I have read on other threads. Where did you obtain your dollar costs figures from? I tried to Bing it to find information, but to no avail. Where would one find this info?

    Also, if you work IT, I'll assume you work within a company budget and that must be under tremendous pressure due to the economical times. I'm quite sure if times were better that companies would consider the upgrade.
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  6. #6


    Coke: "If it involves an initial learning curve, some initial down time, and initial costs and downtime supporting the new OS, then why even do it?"

    If there is no added value in excess of cost for doing it, it should not be done.
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  7. #7


    Hippsie,

    The point I am making is a simple economic one. One should not do something without first carefully considering the cost, benefit, and consequence. Doing something simply because it is the latest and greatest thing (according to the vendor marketing BS) without that consideration is the way to fail. All action has cost and consequence. Only some actions have benefits that exceed cost. Some costs and consequences are not immediately visible. Especially the cost of lost opportunity that is experienced because of ill conceived action getting in the way.
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  8. #8


    Adelaide
    Posts : 1,338
    Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Linux Mint 17.1 MATE (64 bit)


    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    Now, to say that going to the newest thing on the block isn't always value added, well, you don't say? If that were so, everyone would still be using xp and wouldn't be going to 7.
    Based on the fallacious assumption that there were no improvements in W7 (compared to XP).

    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    If that were so, people would still be using Office 2003 and file based UIs instead of the Ribbon based versions.
    I regularly read comments from people who say that exact thing (i.e. they hate the Ribbon).
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  9. #9


    Posts : 299
    win 7 home premium 64 bit


    Quote Originally Posted by Lionell View Post
    Hippsie,

    The point I am making is a simple economic one. One should not do something without first carefully considering the cost, benefit, and consequence. Doing something simply because it is the latest and greatest thing (according to the vendor marketing BS) without that consideration is the way to fail. All action has cost and consequence. Only some actions have benefits that exceed cost. Some costs and consequences are not immediately visible. Especially the cost of lost opportunity that is experienced because of ill conceived action getting in the way.

    Well thought out, rational post!

    Logic is SO frustrating to some folks, it gets in the way of their agenda...cokey?
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  10. #10


    Posts : 993
    Windows 8 pro Retail


    What I'm not seeing here, is that WHAT we've seen so far is more geared towards the consumer space, not business nor enterprise. I cannot see a metro interface in any business environment. From what we seen, I would imagine a business's employee playing at work, and not getting anything done. As well as Microsoft is sneaky. Has anyone seen a native server O/S for Windows 8 yet? Wanna bet me, it won't contain a Metro interface, or one more geared to the business world? I think ONCE we've seen the Professional version of Windows, it will be a change up of what we are seeing here. Think about it, how many businesses you know will buy Windows Metro Professional! LoL

    P.S. That's what I think would of been a better name than Windows 8. Windows Metro.
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Windows 8 in the Enterprise: Why IT pros say no
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