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Solid-state drives lose data if left without power

  1. #1


    Posts : 22,565
    64-bit Windows 10

    Solid-state drives lose data if left without power


    Storage. It's not a sexy topic. But everyone uses it in some way or another. You have iPhones, you have computers. Everyone knows how important a person's data is. But it doesn't just "disappear."

    Or does it?

    New research suggests that newer solid-state hard drives, which are faster and offer better performance, are vulnerable to an inherent flaw -- they lose data loss when they're left dormant in storage for periods of time where the temperature isn't properly regulated.

    The worrying factor is that the period of time can be weeks, months, but even in some circumstances -- just a few days.

    Solid-state drives are better than regular mechanical hard drives, which are slow and sluggish. But unless they're battered around, smashed, or poured in acid, they pretty much last forever.
    Read more: Solid-state drives lose data if left without power for just a few days | ZDNet

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  2. #2


    United States
    Posts : 3,093
    Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit


    Great article Brink!

    From what I know, and that may be questionable, CD/DVD media is still the winner if one wants to save data for 10-20 years (in a dark, dry place). Never thought SSD drives could save data indefinitely especially if powered off for long periods and exposed to certain environmental factors.

    I still remember my VHS tapes left in a damp basement. The tape was a stuck together wrinkled blob. All media is subject to degradation under the right environmental factors, even hard drives.
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  3. #3


    S.E. Texas
    Posts : 61
    windows 8.1 64bit


    "they lose data loss when"
    Doesn't anyone proofread this stuff?
    Wondering what kind of chips they use in these things. Are they that temp sensitive?
    "That means if a solid-state drive is stored in a warm room, say 25F (25C), its data can last for about two years. But, if that goes up by a mere few degrees to 86F (30C), that data's retention period will be cut in half."
    From 25 to 85 is a "few mere degrees"? I think he didn't convert right. 25C is 77F, not 25F. Makes more sense.
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  4. #4


    Quote Originally Posted by cradom View Post
    Doesn't anyone proofread this stuff?
    Not in this day and age.
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  5. #5


    United States
    Posts : 3,093
    Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit


    I was just reading the general premise but yea, the temp conversion is off. Also wonder about quoting a major HD manufacturer about the flaws with SSD. No bias there?
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  6. #6



    Trying to Sith things out
    Bamberg Germany
    Posts : 2,288
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit


    I also read a few years ago that even storage HDD's should have their data updated or moved around once in a while because of Bit Rot or Silent Corruption. Here's an article I just found on the fly(not the one I read a few years ago):
    Simply put, silent corruption refers to data blocks recorded to magnetic media—disk or tape—that are eventually rendered unreadable by a combination of background radiation and media aging or defects. When this happens, you can lose access to a file even after it’s been saved.

    On a larger scale, this problem could wipe out an entire RAID system full of data. Bit rot is also quite nefarious in its destructive capabilities. It can develop over time on media containing successfully recorded bits: Everything may look fine on the surface, but something rotten is lurking in the state of magnetic media
    Source IRON MOUNTAIN

    So the moral of the story: All long term storage should be updated/moved around on a regular basis.
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  7. #7


    Posts : 9
    win7 and win8.1


    There is also what we call CD/DVD Rot
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  8. #8



    Trying to Sith things out
    Bamberg Germany
    Posts : 2,288
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit


    Entropy: Entropy, a measure of the disorder in a system containing energy or information. The less ordered a system is, the greater is its entropy.
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  9. #9


    Quote Originally Posted by cradom View Post
    "they lose data loss when"
    Doesn't anyone proofread this stuff?
    Wondering what kind of chips they use in these things. Are they that temp sensitive?
    "That means if a solid-state drive is stored in a warm room, say 25F (25C), its data can last for about two years. But, if that goes up by a mere few degrees to 86F (30C), that data's retention period will be cut in half."
    From 25 to 85 is a "few mere degrees"? I think he didn't convert right. 25C is 77F, not 25F. Makes more sense.
    Proofread? Ya gotta be kidding!
    I can make a little Boo Boo once in a while, but for some of the writers, I doubt that English is even their first language.
    They have little or NO concept of proper sentence structure, grammar or punctuation. Eh?
    Our local newspaper (fish wrap) is the Star Banner, but most of us refer to it as the "Star Bungler".
    Typos, poor grammar and lack of proper punctuation, rule the roost.

    Now for the SSD drive.....
    As I've been saying for about 35 years now, (that I've been building PC's) what we see as a home computer, is built by the lowest bidder, out of the cheapest parts available, known in the electronics industry as "Hobby Grade Components". They are especially noted for their temperature sensitivity and short life spans. But then, if the home computer were made with top quality components (NASA grade), a little desktop PC would cost us about $30,000 or more. So we trade off quality for price.

    I'm not one bit surprised, that the SSD's are temperature sensitive. It's just the quality of the components that they are made from, in order to be marketable to consumers.
    An occasional Backup & Restore is a great hedge against data loss. I do the Backup & Restore routine on my main HD at least once a month. That refreshes all the data on the drive and does a great Defrag at the same time.
    And, the whole operation takes less than an hour.

    I've been telling my customers, for 35 years, "if you have some important data, a hard drive is the worse place you can store it, because when (not IF) it crashes, you've lost everything".

    I heartily suggest that all data be backed up regularly, and for permanent storage, burned to a CD or DVD.
    (and then kept in a cool, dark place.)

    Cheers mates!
    TechnoMage
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  10. #10



    Trying to Sith things out
    Bamberg Germany
    Posts : 2,288
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit


    Quote Originally Posted by TechnoMage View Post
    And, the whole operation takes less than an hour.

    I've been telling my customers, for 35 years, "if you have some important data, a hard drive is the worse place you can store it, because when (not IF) it crashes, you've lost everything".


    TechnoMage
    My most important stuff is still stored analogue(paper)
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

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Solid-state drives lose data if left without power
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