Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Windows 10 will include a command line package manager

  1. #1


    Posts : 328
    Windows 8.1 (x64)

    Windows 10 will include a command line package manager


    With Windows 10, however, we are finally getting an official package manager: OneGet. In the current build of Windows 10 Technical Preview, you can open up PowerShell and use OneGet to install thousands of applications with commands such as Find-Package VLC and Install-Package Firefox. OneGet seems to implement all of the usual functions that you’d expect from a package manager. You can search for packages, add new sources/repos, uninstall packages, install packages, and so on. OneGet uses the same package format as Chocolatey, one of the most popular third-party package managers for Windows (and indeed, you can add the Chocolatey repo to OneGet if you so wish).
    Source : Windows 10 will come with a command line package manager, much to the lament of Linux users | ExtremeTech

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  2. #2


    Posts : 168
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64


    This might end up being one of those features I think will be neat, and I'll try it, and I'll be glad it's there because it achieves parity with Linux in that respect, and then maybe never use again. But on the other hand I can see that for some specific pieces of software or components, or maybe for power users it would actually be easier to do it this way rather than using a GUI setup wizard or whatever. Perhaps the command line would be more flexible/powerful.
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  3. #3


    Posts : 94
    Windows 7


    Ew ew ew... It reeks of Linux. The single thing that pissed me off the most about 7/8 was explorer. It had a whole Linux feel to it, including the address breadcrumb, which I'd only seen in Ubuntu prior to 7. The whole MS trying to make Windows look and behave like Linux cheapened the Windows experience for me... XP was the only true windows for me.

    The reason why Microsoft became a successful company in the first place was b/c they made computers accessible to non-geek types. Linux is pure geekiness, and this would be Microsoft's latest attempt at emulating nerdism...
    Last edited by eatup; 04 Nov 2014 at 11:06.
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  4. #4


    Reeks of Linux? Cannot understand why somebody would not want to use a utility that could update almost everything on your computer with a single command.

    XP was what it was at the time. Security was terrible, boxes were infected with all kinds of bad stuff. Blue screens were more prevalent. Boxes would slow down and get reinstalled every couple of months. Versions of IE were terrible. It's very old, it doesn't take advantage of changes in underlying hardware. I cannot imagine all being on XP.
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  5. #5


    Posts : 94
    Windows 7


    Quote Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
    Reeks of Linux? Cannot understand why somebody would not want to use a utility that could update almost everything on your computer with a single command.

    XP was what it was at the time. Security was terrible, boxes were infected with all kinds of bad stuff. Blue screens were more prevalent. Boxes would slow down and get reinstalled every couple of months. Versions of IE were terrible. It's very old, it doesn't take advantage of changes in underlying hardware. I cannot imagine all being on XP.
    Pardon me? I can get up to 8X the fps in DirectX 9 games in XP (compared to 7/8). Also, my NET 3.5 apps run 8X more smoothly in XP compared to 7/8 (I've benchmarked it to 7/8 using the NET 4.5 version, which is more "native" to 8). So, you're telling me all these stats indicate XP is an inferior OS to 7/8? Note: The latter is the real reason why I'm on XP most of the time on any win 7/8 machine that has XP drivers.

    I wish I could approach a Windows exec and show them: This is how my app behaves in XP. This is how it behaves when recompiled for the latest .NET framework in 7/8. Why has my computer gone back to the stone age when I retarget the same source code for the latter OSes?
    Last edited by eatup; 04 Nov 2014 at 14:18.
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  6. #6


    Posts : 148
    Windows 8.1 Update 1


    Well what a miracle: Very old DX9 games run more smoothly on the very old os they were designed for (Win XP) than they do on the latest os. Why is it that I am not really surprised by this result? How many FPS do you get running a DX 10 or 11 game on XP? Oh wait, they do not run on XP? Oh, that's a shame, isn't it? I for my part am very happy that XP is finally dead. XP was designed in the pre-internet era and was one big security threat to all pc's out there.
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  7. #7


    Posts : 94
    Windows 7


    Quote Originally Posted by altae View Post
    Well what a miracle: Very old DX9 games run more smoothly on the very old os they were designed for (Win XP) than they do on the latest os. Why is it that I am not really surprised by this result? How many FPS do you get running a DX 10 or 11 game on XP? Oh wait, they do not run on XP? Oh, that's a shame, isn't it? I for my part am very happy that XP is finally dead. XP was designed in the pre-internet era and was one big security threat to all pc's out there.

    1. Wow, somebody clearly didn't read the rest of my post.
    2. I'm not a gamer. I only used some DX 9 games for benchmarking
    3. I'm re-compiling (edit: RECOMPILING, can't emphasize enuf) some .NET apps for W7/8. In "gaming terms", it would be something akin to taking some DX9 game's source code and make it run on DX11, except I don't have to edit anything b/c the source code doesn't use any "legacy" libraries only found in "older" WinXP. My computer gets sent back to the stone age in "DX11"...
    4. I used to joke (elsewhere) that in 10 years, Windows [ ] on some future machine will have the same performance as my current rig on XP...
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  8. #8


    Posts : 148
    Windows 8.1 Update 1


    In fact I did read your entire post. And I do understand what compiling means. But this does not mean your examples are meaningful at all. We don't know the specs of your pc, we don't know how well you recompiled the apps and we don't know how you intend to measure the smoothness of your apps so you can compare how well they run on XP and Windows 8. What's more there is a significant flaw in your approach of comparing performance. In order to compare XP to Windows 8 you would have to take hardware that was designed for Windows XP (say a very old pentium single core cpu, a very old gpu plus say 500 MB of Ram) and compare that hardware to current hardware that is designed to run Windows 8. Then run your apps on those machines, this way you would get a meaningful comparison. I can also take a program that was written for Windows 95 (say a very old version of MS Word), install Windows 95 on relatively new pc. Then I could run that very old version of MS Word on Windows 8 on the same machine (probably I would also have to adapt it's code) and it would most likely perform very poorly. No, such a comparison would by no means say anything more than the fact the the days of Windows 95 are long gone.
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  9. #9


    Posts : 94
    Windows 7


    Quote Originally Posted by altae View Post
    In fact I did read your entire post. And I do understand what compiling means. But this does not mean your examples are meaningful at all. We don't know the specs of your pc, we don't know how well you recompiled the apps and we don't know how you intend to measure the smoothness of your apps so you can compare how well they run on XP and Windows 8. What's more there is a significant flaw in your approach of comparing performance. In order to compare XP to Windows 8 you would have to take hardware that was designed for Windows XP (say a very old pentium single core cpu, a very old gpu plus say 500 MB of Ram) and compare that hardware to current hardware that is designed to run Windows 8. Then run your apps on those machines, this way you would get a meaningful comparison. I can also take a program that was written for Windows 95 (say a very old version of MS Word), install Windows 95 on relatively new pc. Then I could run that very old version of MS Word on Windows 8 on the same machine (probably I would also have to adapt it's code) and it would most likely perform very poorly. No, such a comparison would by no means say anything more than the fact the the days of Windows 95 are long gone.
    None of it really matters. The end result is XP runs circles around 7/8/9 many times over on the same hardware...
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  10. #10


    A Finnish ex-pat in Leipzig, Germany
    Posts : 1,452
    Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center


    Those running Windows 10 Tech Preview, here's the tut on our sister site Ten Forums on how to get testing PowerShell OneGet: PowerShell OneGet - Install Apps from Command Line

    It uses Chocolatey's repository, Chocolatey itself works well from command line even in Windows 8 & 8.1. Eight Forums Tutorial: Chocolatey - Install Apps from Command Line

    I like both and use them as much as I can, in repository already 2,300+ applications.

    Quote Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
    Cannot understand why somebody would not want to use a utility that could update almost everything on your computer with a single command.
    Exactly . New installation, as soon as you arrive to Desktop first time you want to install your usual stuff, let's be modest and install only WinRAR, Adobe Reader, VLC, Chrome, Firefox and Opera, latest versions of each except I do not like the latest versions of FireFox so let's install version 28 of that. Some prefer to do this by browsing to respective sites, clicking this and that to get download, then unselect all "Do you also want to install this excellent piece of software?" offers, installing then all one by one accepting licenses and repeatedly clicking Next.

    I prefer giving one command instead...
    Code:
    Install-Package -Name WinRAR, AdobeReader, VLC, Chrome, Firefox -RequiredVersion 28.0, Opera
    ... and go get some coffee, all apps installed when I come back.

    Or do you prefer to select apps to install from a list:
    Code:
    Find-Package | Out-GridView -PassThru | Install-Package
    Now select the apps you want to install and click OK to install all of them.

    The above was Windows 10 PowerShell OneGet. In Windows 8.1 using Chocolatey my usual apps could be installed with:
    Code:
    Choco Install WinRAR, AdobeReader, VLC, Chrome, Firefox, Opera
    Want to update all your installed apps at the same time:
    Code:
    Choco Update All
    Kari
    Last edited by Kari; 04 Nov 2014 at 22:09. Reason: Fixed some of the worst typos :).
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Windows 10 will include a command line package manager
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