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Five reasons I'd rather run Windows 8 than Linux

  1. #1

    Five reasons I'd rather run Windows 8 than Linux


    Many of us use Linux every day. Thankfully, most of the people using Linux don't know they're using Linux.

    My octogenarian parents, for example, have been using their TiVo DVRs for years, but have no idea that there's a variant of Linux running deep inside. The guy who installed my kitchen cabinets, who loves his Android phone but insists Facebook is hard to use has no idea he's using a variant of Linux....


    Reason #1: As soon as you mention one distro, all the fanboys go insane claiming you've made the wrong choice.
    You did it, didn't you? Just as soon as I mentioned Mint, a whole bunch of you started to foam at the mouth. Mint's not the distro-du-jour anymore. There's Bodhi. There's Xubuntu. There's the truly unfortunately named DouDou.
    Read more at: Five reasons I'd rather run Windows 8 than Linux | ZDNet
    Last edited by labeeman; 27 Jan 2014 at 14:14.

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  2. #2


    Lol - very amusing. Linux and Apple people seem to be a bit "different" and are very proud of it. I guess it's the old " the masses are asses" syndrome.
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  3. #3


    Posts : 29
    Manjaro Linux/Ubuntu 12.04 LTS/Windows 8.1 Pro
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  4. #4


    USA, Idaho
    Posts : 1,062
    Win 8, (VM win7, XP, Vista)


    It was a fun read, and find myself agreeing with the author. Been using Suse Linux Enterprise since 9.1 and do enjoy using it, albeit it just won't run Mac OS X or Windows OS programs/applications. I do use VMWare Workstation with Suse, however just not all that good. But I guess it is all in the brain of the user. . .
    Last edited by Lee; 28 Jan 2014 at 10:34.
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  5. #5


    Joisey
    Posts : 315
    Windows 8.1 consumer 64 bit


    One reason TO run Linux - to get rid of XP without replacing your computer. I just loaded Ubuntu onto my adult daughter's laptop and she loves it. She did not want to spend money on a new computer or OS and the one she has is slow enough on XP, never mind something newer.

    She spends 99% of her time on the thing in Firefox and her occasional need for MS office is met with the office clone supplied with Ubuntu. The Ubuntu installer even let me set up the system to dual boot so she can still run XP once in a while to update her phone with iTunes.

    This is a great solution for her, hopefully this will delay her need for a new computer until the Chromebook or something like it matures enough to meet her needs.
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  6. #6


    Posts : 42
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    Amen to this last comment. I have an 82-year old friend who was running XP, very slooooowly on a 20th century machine. I put Lubuntu on his computer and he's been quite happy. He likes the speed and the lack of malware. Yes, I know there are viruses out there for Linux, but in 20 years I have yet to experience one.
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  7. #7


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    So the synopsis of the whole article is: the Linux community are a bunch of rude, anti-socialites that won't help and big boy Windows programs aren't there.

    Seems about right...
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  8. #8


    As long as you're content with very slender selections of 3rd-party software and hardware support, these other OSes will do a fine job. And it's true that the people who find Windows confusing to install and administer would absolutely freak if they had to set up a Linux derivative all by themselves....;)

    Windows is by far the runaway best-seller that it is (even though many Linux distros are free to the end user, the demand for purchasing Windows is astronomically higher nonetheless) for what I think are essentially three basic reasons:

    1) Windows supports far more 3rd-party software.

    2) Windows supports far more 3rd-party hardware.

    3) My current @home version of Win8.1x64 (non-Metro) installation is far more backwards compatible, which sort of loops back into #1 above, but is actually a different factor in and of itself.

    You could of course add that setting up Windows is far easier than setting up your average Linux distro, but a lot of that is because of #2, above.

    Bottom line for me is that if you only use a computer OS for web browsing and email and some amateurish word processing & spread-sheeting, then probably any old functional OS will do provided it can support the hardware you own. But if you actually want to *use* an OS to accomplish a wide variety of tasks over and above web browsing, etc., there's no equivalent to Windows anywhere. There is little mystery behind Windows' popularity, imo.

    I recall years ago coming off of eight years of the Amiga's Workbench OS versions (because C= went belly up), buying in a sequence no less than three separate versions of OS/2. I was very disappointed that even with each successive version I managed to have at least one piece of critical hardware which no version of OS/2 supported (IBM had not even written placeholder drivers for it as Microsoft does)--on one occasion that I recall it was my CD-ROM drive, for goodness' sake. End result was that after much finagling I couldn't do what I needed to do with any version of OS/2 and wound up successively installing, then uninstalling each version! IBM simply quit with the OS/2 job only half finished--OS/2 never had a chance. Belatedly, I moved my current OS at the time to Win3.x which I pretty much loathed because it was so crude, at least compared to C='s Workbench. But then Microsoft surprised me with Win95 which was a giant leap ahead from Win3.1, and then to XP which was finally getting into close to the "decent" range. And with Vista, Win7, and now Win8.x, I'm very happy with Microsoft in the OS department these days. Except for the Metro GUI--I don't have any interest in touchscreens (but fortunately Metro is optional in 8.x). I think if Microsoft will get back to desktop OS development with gusto the company has a lot of great stuff in the pipeline almost ready to see the light of day. The pent up demand for new and invigorating desktop functionality must be enormous.
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  9. #9


    Posts : 29
    Manjaro Linux/Ubuntu 12.04 LTS/Windows 8.1 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by waltc View Post
    As long as you're content with very slender selections of 3rd-party software and hardware support, these other OSes will do a fine job. And it's true that the people who find Windows confusing to install and administer would absolutely freak if they had to set up a Linux derivative all by themselves....

    Windows is by far the runaway best-seller that it is (even though many Linux distros are free to the end user, the demand for purchasing Windows is astronomically higher nonetheless) for what I think are essentially three basic reasons:

    1) Windows supports far more 3rd-party software.

    2) Windows supports far more 3rd-party hardware.

    3) My current @home version of Win8.1x64 (non-Metro) installation is far more backwards compatible, which sort of loops back into #1 above, but is actually a different factor in and of itself.

    You could of course add that setting up Windows is far easier than setting up your average Linux distro, but a lot of that is because of #2, above.

    Bottom line for me is that if you only use a computer OS for web browsing and email and some amateurish word processing & spread-sheeting, then probably any old functional OS will do provided it can support the hardware you own. But if you actually want to *use* an OS to accomplish a wide variety of tasks over and above web browsing, etc., there's no equivalent to Windows anywhere. There is little mystery behind Windows' popularity, imo.

    I recall years ago coming off of eight years of the Amiga's Workbench OS versions (because C= went belly up), buying in a sequence no less than three separate versions of OS/2. I was very disappointed that even with each successive version I managed to have at least one piece of critical hardware which no version of OS/2 supported (IBM had not even written placeholder drivers for it as Microsoft does)--on one occasion that I recall it was my CD-ROM drive, for goodness' sake. End result was that after much finagling I couldn't do what I needed to do with any version of OS/2 and wound up successively installing, then uninstalling each version! IBM simply quit with the OS/2 job only half finished--OS/2 never had a chance. Belatedly, I moved my current OS at the time to Win3.x which I pretty much loathed because it was so crude, at least compared to C='s Workbench. But then Microsoft surprised me with Win95 which was a giant leap ahead from Win3.1, and then to XP which was finally getting into close to the "decent" range. And with Vista, Win7, and now Win8.x, I'm very happy with Microsoft in the OS department these days. Except for the Metro GUI--I don't have any interest in touchscreens (but fortunately Metro is optional in 8.x). I think if Microsoft will get back to desktop OS development with gusto the company has a lot of great stuff in the pipeline almost ready to see the light of day. The pent up demand for new and invigorating desktop functionality must be enormous.

    Most Windows programs will work on Linux with Wine. Wine is a windows compatibility layer that will run any Microsoft Office, games, etc..

    Wine will run Sand-boxed so if it becomes infected by a windows virus you can simply delete it, leaving your Linux box unaffected.


    Easily install ubuntu with Graphical User Interface.

    There are tons of free 3rd party software that you can install on Linux and Ubuntu.

    Look at the Ubuntu Software center to find 3rd party applications.
    Click image for larger version

    LOL there is a lot more to do in linux than just browsing the web.

    here are a few programs to start you off:

    Gimp is almost exactly the same thing as Adobe photoshop

    Blender
    Blender is a free and open source 3D animation suite. It supports the entirety of the 3D pipelineómodeling, rigging, animation, simulation, rendering, compositing and motion tracking, even video editing and game creation. Advanced users employ Blenderís API for Python scripting to customize the application and write specialized tools; often these are included in Blenderís future releases. Blender is well suited to individuals and small studios who benefit from its unified pipeline and responsive development process. Examples from many Blender-based projects are available in the showcase.Blender is cross-platform and runs equally well on Linux, Windows and Macintosh computers. Its interface uses OpenGL to provide a consistent experience. To confirm specific compatibility, the list of supported platforms indicates those regularly tested by the development team.
    As a community-driven project under the GNU General Public License (GPL), the public is empowered to make small and large changes to the code base, which leads to new features, responsive bug fixes, and better usability. Blender has no price tag, but you can invest, participate, and help to advance a powerful collaborative tool: Blender is your own 3D software.
    Last edited by SteamGamer; 28 Jan 2014 at 19:05.
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  10. #10


    Posts : 5,360
    7/8/ubuntu/Linux Deepin


    waltc

    Windows is by far the runaway best-seller that it is....for what I think are essentially three basic reasons:
    It is because for a long time it was the only thing out there pre-installed.

    ( Unless you count Mac which was only aimed at the higher price ponts).
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Five reasons I'd rather run Windows 8 than Linux
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