Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Beware: CryptoLocker Virus

  1. #31


    Posts : 82
    Windows 8.1


    Yes it infects local drives too

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  2. #32


    Quote Originally Posted by vram View Post
    How much damage can this thing do to a domain connected PC running a restricted account profile in XP? I'm going to assume it will encrypt all files within the user profile and whatever network shares it has permission to access? Upon infection, would it be safe to delete the user profile, delete all restore points and create a new profile?
    The machine I cleaned up was networked but didn't have drives mapped. It infected all of the machine's data files but nothing on the networked machine. My client was very agreeable to a fresh install so I didn't do much in the way of trying to clean his machine. Although I read that Security Esssentials was detecting the malware a week or two earlier it didn't pick up this variant until a day or two after he was infected. Verified by downloading to one of our test machines.
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  3. #33


    Posts : 79
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit


    Quote Originally Posted by cyberSAR View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by vram View Post
    How much damage can this thing do to a domain connected PC running a restricted account profile in XP? I'm going to assume it will encrypt all files within the user profile and whatever network shares it has permission to access? Upon infection, would it be safe to delete the user profile, delete all restore points and create a new profile?
    The machine I cleaned up was networked but didn't have drives mapped. It infected all of the machine's data files but nothing on the networked machine. My client was very agreeable to a fresh install so I didn't do much in the way of trying to clean his machine. Although I read that Security Esssentials was detecting the malware a week or two earlier it didn't pick up this variant until a day or two after he was infected. Verified by downloading to one of our test machines.
    I would be very interested to know if it can "break out" of a profile that doesn't have admin privileges and infect the rest of the computer.
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  4. #34


    Posts : 82
    Windows 8.1


    It can only infect to the extent of the infected user rights
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  5. #35


    Posts : 959
    Windows 8.1, 10


    ... but if the user has rights to change a file or document, it can encrypt those files, which means it can cause a lot of damage.
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  6. #36


    Posts : 79
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit


    Quote Originally Posted by DavidY View Post
    ... but if the user has rights to change a file or document, it can encrypt those files, which means it can cause a lot of damage.
    This would = a very crappy day at my workplace. I'm very tempted to install cryptoprotect on all the machines @ work. Do AV vendors have this menace in their defs yet?
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  7. #37


    Just a question, no political overtone is intended...

    Since the NSA, FBI, CIA, etc., monitor internet traffic, shouldn't they be able to eradicate this and other type of malware once it has been identified? If they can tap world leaders cell phones for years, identifying the hackers seems like an easier task.

    After all, the US government does have a cyber security initiative and one of its tenet is "Collaborate and share your knowledge". While the initiative is intended to protect the government and critical infrastructure from cyber warfare, the public perception of the US intelligence services would be different, if they'd utilize their monitoring to protect people from malware. I for one would applaud, if they'd do, and may not view them as critically as I do now...
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  8. #38


    Posts : 79
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit


    Quote Originally Posted by Cr00zng View Post
    Just a question, no political overtone is intended...

    Since the NSA, FBI, CIA, etc., monitor internet traffic, shouldn't they be able to eradicate this and other type of malware once it has been identified? If they can tap world leaders cell phones for years, identifying the hackers seems like an easier task.

    After all, the US government does have a cyber security initiative and one of its tenet is "Collaborate and share your knowledge". While the initiative is intended to protect the government and critical infrastructure from cyber warfare, the public perception of the US intelligence services would be different, if they'd utilize their monitoring to protect people from malware. I for one would applaud, if they'd do, and may not view them as critically as I do now...
    I've always thought it would be a good idea to implement some sort of backbone malware filtering, so as long as its operated by a non-government/politically motivated organization, with clear rules from the outset prohibiting it from intentional filtering of non-malicious content.

    Has anyone tested Sandboxie to see if this thing can break out of its sandbox?

    Sandboxie - Sandbox software for application isolation and secure Web browsing
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  9. #39


    Bay Area
    Posts : 21,837
    Windows 7 Home Premium x64


    CryptoLocker developer launches Decryption websie; 10 Bitcoins for Decryption Keys

    There's an extraordinary malware making rock-n-roll over the Internet and if you are one of the unlucky folks to cross its path, then it could make your computer unusable and you have to pay a few hundred Dollars to retrieve your important data back.

    We have warned our readers in many previous articles about a nasty piece of Ransomware malware called 'CryptoLocker', which is targeting computers running the Microsoft Windows operating system.

    The CryptoLocker Ransomware encrypts the files on a victim’s computer and issues an ultimatum - Pay up or lose your data. Users who are getting infected with CryptoLocker can see a message informing them that their computer is locked up and their files encrypted. It then asks them to make a ransom payment, which typically ranges between $100 and $700 or 2 Bitcoins, to get their files back.
    Source

    A Guy
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  10. #40


    Posts : 959
    Windows 8.1, 10


    They'll be opening up a Customer Services helpline next!
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Beware: CryptoLocker Virus
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