Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Microsoft warns Windows XP users risk 'zero day forever'

  1. #51


    Delaware, USA
    Posts : 79
    Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit, Windows 7 Pro 64-bit, Windows XP Pro 32-bit, Ubuntu 14.04 64-bit


    Quote Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DJRoff View Post
    Ok, that's good to know, if I ever decide to try nLite again, I'll just avoid anything but the Service Packs. But I thought that was the idea behind slipstreaming, that you could include ANY special files you wanted as part of the disk.
    I thought that too.
    Maybe they have to be added to the ISO maker in a specific order.

    The problem may only be with a few of the updates.
    I have a library of 95 XP updates (up to July 2012).
    I didn't try adding them one at a time until it broke the ISO (for obvious reasons).

    Quote Originally Posted by DJRoff View Post
    As far as the floppy routine, some mobo mfrs have their own special drivers (I once worked on an ASRock board like that, their driver was called jraidx86.inf or something like that), and most of them will have some type of "MAKE_DISK" thing you can download, to assemble a usable floppy. In most cases, this only amounts to 3 or 4 files in root position. In a few instances, though, your motherboard might be looking for something specific, like an autorun or exec.bat folder or something, which only their "MAKE_DISK" widget will create. It will usually be in their list of drivers under the heading of SATA or RAID, if they have one.
    Thanks for that info.
    No problem!

    With the nLite, I believe the only things I tried to add in were SP3 (my existing disk was current thru SP2) and the now-infamous AHCI drivers. I don't recall the order I did that in, or if I tried altering the order. But I burned thru 3 or 4 different CDs, without getting a single usable disk. I finally gave up, and tried the floppy routine, with smashing success. Just had to add in SP3 afterward, and wade thru 9 zillion updates, is all. Funny how our experiences were exactly opposite on these two methods! But that's one of the things I always liked about XP, there was always more than one way to get something done.

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #52


    Portsmouth Hants
    Posts : 772
    Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center


    After "9 zillion updates", and 14 years of real-time exposure, how many possible exploits are left for XP, which will be a legacy, minority OS?

    Who has the statistics on the exploits aimed at DOS/Windows 9x specifically since they became passť? I would guess that there were hardly any at all.

    Is some black hatter group going to aim specifically to compromise the workings of XP, when there are three generations of Microsoft OSs based on the Vista blueprint on the majority of PCs in use?

    I doubt it. There is neither a challenge nor any prestige for the hackers in such a project.

    XP will remain as secure as it has been for years, as long as used prudently, online or off, and it will become more secure from threats over time, as it becomes a rarity. Nobody I know is scared of skinheads any more for exactly the same reason.

    If the threats to personal liberty in the Windows 8 family as outlined in other current news threads here (suddenly deleted?) are true, XP is already a safer bet for the future.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #53


    Adelaide
    Posts : 1,338
    Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Linux Mint 17.1 MATE (64 bit)


    Quote Originally Posted by DJRoff View Post
    No problem!

    With the nLite, I believe the only things I tried to add in were SP3 (my existing disk was current thru SP2) and the now-infamous AHCI drivers. I don't recall the order I did that in, or if I tried altering the order. But I burned thru 3 or 4 different CDs, without getting a single usable disk. I finally gave up, and tried the floppy routine, with smashing success. Just had to add in SP3 afterward, and wade thru 9 zillion updates, is all. Funny how our experiences were exactly opposite on these two methods! But that's one of the things I always liked about XP, there was always more than one way to get something done.
    I tried installing my ISOs in a VM to see if they were going to work, before I burned a disc.

    I put it down to the "mysterious mysteries of computing" (like how FF crashes non-stop on some machines and yet it runs perfectly on others).

    Quote Originally Posted by fafhrd View Post
    If the threats to personal liberty in the Windows 8 family as outlined in other current news threads here (suddenly deleted?) are true, ...
    That is yet another mystery.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #54


    Delaware, USA
    Posts : 79
    Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit, Windows 7 Pro 64-bit, Windows XP Pro 32-bit, Ubuntu 14.04 64-bit


    Quote Originally Posted by fafhrd View Post
    After "9 zillion updates", and 14 years of real-time exposure, how many possible exploits are left for XP, which will be a legacy, minority OS?

    Who has the statistics on the exploits aimed at DOS/Windows 9x specifically since they became passť? I would guess that there were hardly any at all.

    Is some black hatter group going to aim specifically to compromise the workings of XP, when there are three generations of Microsoft OSs based on the Vista blueprint on the majority of PCs in use?

    I doubt it. There is neither a challenge nor any prestige for the hackers in such a project.

    XP will remain as secure as it has been for years, as long as used prudently, online or off, and it will become more secure from threats over time, as it becomes a rarity. Nobody I know is scared of skinheads any more for exactly the same reason.

    If the threats to personal liberty in the Windows 8 family as outlined in other current news threads here (suddenly deleted?) are true, XP is already a safer bet for the future.
    You're probably right, there. Hackers and virus engineers don't like to go after low-hanging fruit, it's challenges they're after, bragging rights for having done something difficult. Either that, or the desire to cause as much mayhem as possible, which, to your point, would entail messing with W7 or W8, not Grandfather XP.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #55


    Delaware, USA
    Posts : 79
    Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit, Windows 7 Pro 64-bit, Windows XP Pro 32-bit, Ubuntu 14.04 64-bit


    Quote Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DJRoff View Post
    No problem!

    With the nLite, I believe the only things I tried to add in were SP3 (my existing disk was current thru SP2) and the now-infamous AHCI drivers. I don't recall the order I did that in, or if I tried altering the order. But I burned thru 3 or 4 different CDs, without getting a single usable disk. I finally gave up, and tried the floppy routine, with smashing success. Just had to add in SP3 afterward, and wade thru 9 zillion updates, is all. Funny how our experiences were exactly opposite on these two methods! But that's one of the things I always liked about XP, there was always more than one way to get something done.
    I tried installing my ISOs in a VM to see if they were going to work, before I burned a disc.

    I put it down to the "mysterious mysteries of computing" (like how FF crashes non-stop on some machines and yet it runs perfectly on others).
    Never got comfy with VM modes at all, for whatever reason. Your way was smarter, but I had such a glut of cheap CD-Rs and DVD-Rs hanging about, I just used the blunt-force method.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #56


    Australia
    Posts : 716
    Windows 7 Ult Reatil & Win 8 Pro OEM


    Quote Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
    I put it down to the "mysterious mysteries of computing" (like how FF crashes non-stop on some machines and yet it runs perfectly on others).

    That is yet another mystery.
    Funnily enough I've never had any problems with nLite and apart from SPs have added SATA drivers, various other minor items, and product key. Yet another mystery!

    Talking of mysteries, when my son was training as a PC techo, he spent a year in a government teaching institution dedicated to trainees, with hands on experience; and the head guy there was an ex top techo from M$ Australia.

    On one occasion my son asked the head honcho how to trouble shoot a particular problem he was working on, and the head guy replied: Simple! Reload Windows! Yet another mystery in the realm of PC teachers.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #57


    Adelaide
    Posts : 1,338
    Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Linux Mint 17.1 MATE (64 bit)

    VMware Player


    Quote Originally Posted by DJRoff View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
    I tried installing my ISOs in a VM to see if they were going to work, before I burned a disc.

    I put it down to the "mysterious mysteries of computing" (like how FF crashes non-stop on some machines and yet it runs perfectly on others).
    Never got comfy with VM modes at all, for whatever reason. Your way was smarter, but I had such a glut of cheap CD-Rs and DVD-Rs hanging about, I just used the blunt-force method.
    I use VMware Workstation (v7) on W7 and VMware Player (v5) on Linux Mint.

    VMware Player is free.
    https://my.vmware.com/web/vmware/fre...are_player/5_0

    My method:
    • Start VMware and choose the "Create a New Virtual Machine" option
    • I create a blank/empty virtual HDD (choose the "I will install the operating system later" option)
    • Once the blank/empty virtual HDD has been created, point the virtual CD/DVD drive at the OS ISO file
    • Start the VM
    • Install the OS as normal


    If you save a copy of the blank/empty virtual HDD, you can skip a few steps next time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustang View Post
    Talking of mysteries, when my son was training as a PC techo, he spent a year in a government teaching institution dedicated to trainees, with hands on experience; and the head guy there was an ex top techo from M$ Australia.

    On one occasion my son asked the head honcho how to trouble shoot a particular problem he was working on, and the head guy replied: Simple! Reload Windows! Yet another mystery in the realm of PC teachers.
    In my experience, it is definitely quicker (in most cases) to simply reimage your PC (assuming you have recent backups).

    It takes ~7 minutes to reimage my OS partition.
    It usually takes me much longer to find the correct answer on the Internet.

    Sometimes it can be faster to reinstall the OS, than to try and isolate the problem and then locate the appropriate fix.
    Last edited by lehnerus2000; 23 Aug 2013 at 00:07. Reason: Quote Added
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #58


    but i believe you ..
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #59


    Delaware, USA
    Posts : 79
    Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit, Windows 7 Pro 64-bit, Windows XP Pro 32-bit, Ubuntu 14.04 64-bit


    Quote Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DJRoff View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
    I tried installing my ISOs in a VM to see if they were going to work, before I burned a disc.

    I put it down to the "mysterious mysteries of computing" (like how FF crashes non-stop on some machines and yet it runs perfectly on others).
    Never got comfy with VM modes at all, for whatever reason. Your way was smarter, but I had such a glut of cheap CD-Rs and DVD-Rs hanging about, I just used the blunt-force method.
    I use VMware Workstation (v7) on W7 and VMware Player (v5) on Linux Mint.

    VMware Player is free.
    https://my.vmware.com/web/vmware/fre...are_player/5_0

    My method:
    • Start VMware and choose the "Create a New Virtual Machine" option
    • I create a blank/empty virtual HDD (choose the "I will install the operating system later" option)
    • Once the blank/empty virtual HDD has been created, point the virtual CD/DVD drive at the OS ISO file
    • Start the VM
    • Install the OS as normal


    If you save a copy of the blank/empty virtual HDD, you can skip a few steps next time.
    Thanks for that info, I went to your link and snagged it. Will give it a whirl!
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #60


    Delaware, USA
    Posts : 79
    Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit, Windows 7 Pro 64-bit, Windows XP Pro 32-bit, Ubuntu 14.04 64-bit


    Quote Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustang View Post
    Talking of mysteries, when my son was training as a PC techo, he spent a year in a government teaching institution dedicated to trainees, with hands on experience; and the head guy there was an ex top techo from M$ Australia.

    On one occasion my son asked the head honcho how to trouble shoot a particular problem he was working on, and the head guy replied: Simple! Reload Windows! Yet another mystery in the realm of PC teachers.
    In my experience, it is definitely quicker (in most cases) to simply reimage your PC (assuming you have recent backups).

    It takes ~7 minutes to reimage my OS partition.
    It usually takes me much longer to find the correct answer on the Internet.

    Sometimes it can be faster to reinstall the OS, than to try and isolate the problem and then locate the appropriate fix.
    I suspect this will always be true. But that can be like replacing a child because he cries. Eventually, the new one will probably cry, too. Better to find out what's making him cry, so it doesn't happen over and over again, eh?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

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Microsoft warns Windows XP users risk 'zero day forever'
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