Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Windows XP diehards: Can you survive April 2014 deadline?

  1. #51


    I too use command line when it's called for but for the ordinary day to day running, for average person, there's just no need for that, on windows at least.

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #52


    Adelaide
    Posts : 1,338
    Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Linux Mint 17.1 MATE (64 bit)


    Quote Originally Posted by Lazure View Post
    So you're saying you're one of the people who uses XP on a modern computer where it doesn't belong?
    XP is listed as an OS on my PC (under my avatar).

    On my current PC, it runs better than ever before.
    I hardly ever use it though (~5% of my PC usage).

    I use it for:
    • Window Live Photo Gallery (it doesn't run amok on XP like it does on W7)
    • IE8 for my Web Design course

    I have all of my old games on an XP VM, so I can play them on Windows or Linux.
    I also have:
    • Half a dozen Linux VMs (CentOS, Fedora, OpenSUSE, Peppermint, Pinguy and Ubuntu)
    • W2K8 VM
    • W7 VM with Adobe bloatware, Chrome, IE9 and Opera for my Web Design course

    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo45 View Post
    You need the correct tool for the job --you'd hardly use an adjustable spanner for mending a wristwatch with would you.
    You mean a hammer isn't the correct tool for every job?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #53


    Quote Originally Posted by Mustang View Post
    This thread seems to have strayed a tad off topic, so I'll ask the question: What is the flavor of the month for AV protection? I used to run Avira but got too many false positives, and even when I would mark them as safe, it didn't retain it in the memory and a few starts later would mark them as a threat and delete them.

    I'm currently using Avast AV in real time; with Malwarebytes & Super Anti-spy run periodically.
    Avast for me, family & friends. It was AVG which required me updating everyone's AVG whenever a new version was released.

    I was reading comments about Avast and tried it. Avast provides frequent virus definition updates every day. Avast has the option to automatically install new version when released.

    The very first protection I install on a new computer or new install is SpywareBlaster currently blocking 16,100 items & sites. Check for updates daily but usually there are none.

    Also use Malwarebytes.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #54


    Posts : 149
    Windows 8.1 Pro 64-Bit, Ubuntu 13.04 64-Bit


    My machines have never been personally infected by malware since Windows 2000, when I had IIS service enabled and nimda worm was magically appearing on my computer the moment I had an internet connection. That hit automatically the moment I installed Windows 2000, enabled IIS to play around with having a simple webpage that I have full control over. I have never used IIS since. Granted, with modern firewalls and routers this would be far less likely to happen today anyways.

    However, I use only Firefox and Chrome browsers (not Internet Explorer). I use NoScript (Firefox) and AdBlock (both browsers). I don't go to webpages that I don't know much about, except in a virtual machine running linux. I don't download stuff without checking it through thoroughly, not just with scanning but with general web knowledge and review about it. First thing I do in any Windows install, even on another person's machine, is enable the showing of file extensions; this prevents those user-ignorance tricks like picture-of-my-kids!.jpg.exe in e-mail attachments or file transfers over IM clients. I also keep my system updated at least every few months, when I actually feel like rebooting. I have very long-term uptimes.

    What do I use for AV? MSE (since Windows 7), and I have the free MalwareBytes if I feel the need to manually scan anything with more oompf than what MSE provides. That's it. No reason for me to bog my system down or have some annoying security software get in the way of everything I'm trying to do. I check my startup processes through autoruns (and the new windows 8 task manager) on a regular basis, as well as sweep the list of running processes for anything that doesn't belong there. Even in Windows XP, I managed to stay clean of malware, and the same goes now in Windows 8. I'm careful enough and know better.

    When a family member obtains a new machine, if I didn't build it myself (which is the case nowadays with everyone getting laptops), I go through and enable file extensions in Windows, dump all the bloaty software including the stupid trialware McAfee or Norton crap, remove the IE icons and install Firefox or Chrome (configured with adblock at the very least), get all the current Windows updates (including the optional ones) ,and I go and install more lightweight tools and features that do the same stuff the bloaty software did, but better and without bringing about shady extra baggage. If Windows 7, I install MSE. If Windows 8, I don't install anything and let the built-in defender take over.

    So far most people I've set up for have avoided any major problems related to malware, except in extreme cases where they were blatantly looking for nasty stuff or something. You can only do so much to protect someone from themselves. If not for the need for specific Windows software or hardware requirements, I woulda just put Ubuntu on those people's machines and saved a lot of trouble.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #55


    My first AV was McAfee, I think it was the only one at the time (early '90s) Last ten or so years I used NOD32 but last 2 I'm using Avast free and it has done a bang-up job. Also installed it in countless computers since. It is pretty "lite" on the system and at the same time effective. Also use McShield for the additional protectiom against malware that could come from USB memories as a lot of them get connected to my computer. A lot of people complain that AVs interfere with their systems but the fact is that it is their job. To be any effective they have to stand in between incoming software and the rest of the system and check every byte going in and out, otherwise they are ineffective and do nothing. Another part of an AV should be " behavior shield" which checks for certain behaviors that malware does in an effort to interfere and change parts of OS to be able to do what they do best. Only on the systems that are poor on resources could possibly feel an effect on their speed with a good AV but it's a small tradeoff comparing to the consequences a dangerous virus, spy or trojan can have. Furthermore, internet is not the only danger to your computer, proliferation of USB and other mobile storage media makes it pretty easy to transfer malware and also CDs and DVDs can contain them. As far as "false positives " go they could be a trap too. It's better to check when AV gives alarm and only when you are sure it is harmless to mark it as such so it would not be detected as bad next time.
    Being without any protection, at this day and age is just asking for trouble and according to Murphy's law its just the matter of time disaster strikes, it's not a matter of if but when.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #56


    Australia
    Posts : 716
    Windows 7 Ult Reatil & Win 8 Pro OEM


    I once heard that the second prize in a raffle was a year's free subscription to Norton/McAfee. The first prize was a free copy of Revo Uninstaller Pro that could safely remove McAfee and all it's octopus tentacles.

    Quote Originally Posted by Iehnerus2000
    You mean a hammer isn't the correct tool for every job?
    True story! I have a friend who buys/repairs/sells 2nd hand PCs.

    So he wouldn't be tempted to spend endless hours obsessively determined to make dead mobos come to life ... he has now graduated from giving them the last rites with a hammer ... by putting them to rest by stabbing them with a screw driver ... before binning. Lest he be tempted to de-bin them and try a Lazarus resurrection on them.
    Last edited by Mustang; 09 Jun 2013 at 20:00.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #57


    Adelaide
    Posts : 1,338
    Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Linux Mint 17.1 MATE (64 bit)

    Idiotic Default Setting


    Quote Originally Posted by Lazure View Post
    First thing I do in any Windows install, even on another person's machine, is enable the showing of file extensions; this prevents those user-ignorance tricks like picture-of-my-kids!.jpg.exe in e-mail attachments or file transfers over IM clients.
    Agreed.

    I don't understand why MS continues to use that idiotic default setting ("Hide extensions for known file types" > On - WTF!?).
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #58


    Quote Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lazure View Post
    First thing I do in any Windows install, even on another person's machine, is enable the showing of file extensions; this prevents those user-ignorance tricks like picture-of-my-kids!.jpg.exe in e-mail attachments or file transfers over IM clients.
    Agreed.

    I don't understand why MS continues to use that idiotic default setting ("Hide extensions for known file types" > On - WTF!?).
    Daleks made them do it !! And McAfee is theirs too or fell of the Tardis when they chased Dr.No.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #59


    Windows XP's demise will do more for PC sales than Win 8, HP says

    Computerworld - LAS VEGAS -- Hewlett-Packard executives say that the coming demise of Windows XP may do what Windows 8 could not, and that's boost PC sales significantly.
    Analysts have blamed Windows 8 for hurting PC sales after users failed to embrace its interface redesign
    Windows XP's demise will do more for PC sales than Win 8, HP says - Computerworld
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #60


    Posts : 740
    Windows 8.1


    I think Microsoft should've installed a killswitch into Windows XP that can be disabled by adding a registry key. Then the people who need XP for mission critical tasks could've just added the key while those that are sticking with XP because they never upgrade or update will be forced to do something.

    It'd be risky though, and it would've had to have been in XP for a long time.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst ... 4567 LastLast
Windows XP diehards: Can you survive April 2014 deadline?
Related Threads
Read more at: Windows RT 8.1, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2 Update April, 2014 See also: Install the latest Windows 8.1 Update - Microsoft Windows Help
Windows RT 8.1, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2 Update: April 2014 Note Windows Update may offer update 2919355 again even when the computer already has update 2919355 installed. This is expected, and is in order to resolve a Windows Update client issue. Windows Update only installs...
More...
Source A Guy
Eight Forums Android App Eight Forums IOS App Follow us on Facebook