Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Windows Blue poised to become Windows 8.1

  1. #51


    Posts : 740
    Windows 8.1


    Quote Originally Posted by msdos622wasfun View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by msdos622wasfun View Post
    You should have seen her rather humorous way of addressing the "lack" of the Start button ... she started kind of screaming and said, "Oh my god! Aughghghghghghghghghghghgh..." Then she explained how the Start screen is one giant Start button. It's not really gone (at least, that's how I see it, too).
    What makes '...one giant Start Button...' better than the small one that existed previously? Is it just for the finger painters?
    My cat's name is Mittens.
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  2. #52


    Posts : 168
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64


    Haha. Okay, in all seriousness, without making it sound like I'm disrespecting anybody. The reason I personally don't mind the Start screen is because I would rather use all the real estate I have to look at its contents. I mean, the way I figure, when the Start menu was originally conceived, it wasn't jam packed full of features yet. It just had the basics with Windows 95. But over the past few years it just seemed to me like SO much was crammed into it. Trying to move around little icons to manage my installed software really became a pain. I really don't know how else to explain it. IMO, the Start screen is now a glorious, wonderful dashboard and launching point.

    I'll say it again, there was a small learning curve with Windows 8 when I first approached it, but I managed to overcome it. But I respect everyone for how they feel, and I consider opposing points of view as well. It's just that ... well ... I'm okay with it.
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  3. #53


    Quote Originally Posted by msdos622wasfun View Post
    Haha. Okay, in all seriousness, without making it sound like I'm disrespecting anybody. The reason I personally don't mind the Start screen is because I would rather use all the real estate I have to look at its contents. I mean, the way I figure, when the Start menu was originally conceived, it wasn't jam packed full of features yet. It just had the basics with Windows 95. But over the past few years it just seemed to me like SO much was crammed into it. Trying to move around little icons to manage my installed software really became a pain. I really don't know how else to explain it. IMO, the Start screen is now a glorious, wonderful dashboard and launching point.

    I'll say it again, there was a small learning curve with Windows 8 when I first approached it, but I managed to overcome it. But I respect everyone for how they feel, and I consider opposing points of view as well. It's just that ... well ... I'm okay with it.
    I'm ok with Windows 8 too. I rarely see anything that makes it much different from Windows 7.
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  4. #54


    Posts : 168
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64


    Actually I do agree with the notion that the disappearance of the desktop should be gradual, if it happens at all. I'm trying to imagine the Metro-fied versions of Office and other large pieces of software I use, like Cakewalk SONAR X2. I'm not saying it can't be done or that we shouldn't head in that direction, it's just that since we are only at the beginning of this transition, it's going to take some time so people can adjust.
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  5. #55


    Posts : 92
    Windows 10 (64 bit)


    Blue state: Microsoft's tricky strategy to strike back against Apple and Google

    ...After years of domination, Microsoft is finally facing serious threats at the cores of its business, Office and Windows. Consumers and businesses alike are largely purchasing devices based on their capabilities and form factors rather than the software contained within. Windows is slowly becoming commoditized and Microsoftís traditional allies are looking at Android and Chrome OS as viable alternatives, a trend that threatens the Windows monopoly. Microsoft faces a tricky balancing act as it faces a future thatís very different from its existing business.


    Protecting the two cash cows, Office and Windows, by licensing software to businesses and OEMs has long been the strategy in Redmond ó but things are starting to change. Microsoft is moving towards the cloud, and beyond that it sees Blue.


    ...The other shift with Blue ó software as a service ó also requires consumer buy-in, moving from a product you own to something you rent and pay for annually or monthly. If Windows and Office are truly becoming commoditized then Microsoft has to convince the average customer that itís worth paying to access its software and services in a move away from traditional licensing. Itís a big ask, and Office 365 subscriptions are a testbed for moves elsewhere in the company.
    Blue state: Microsoft's tricky strategy to strike back against Apple and Google | The Verge
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  6. #56


    This is not good.

    Microsoft is moving towards an era where it may eventually sell access to Windows or its services as part of a subscription, in the same way it has started to do so for its Office 365 service.
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  7. #57


    Posts : 1,770
    Windows Phone 6, Windows CE 5, Windows Vista x32, Windows 7 x32/x64, Windows 8 x64


    Quote Originally Posted by labeeman View Post
    This is not good.

    Microsoft is moving towards an era where it may eventually sell access to Windows or its services as part of a subscription, in the same way it has started to do so for its Office 365 service.
    I think that's been on the cards and suspected for some time.
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  8. #58


    Quote Originally Posted by labeeman View Post
    This is not good.

    Microsoft is moving towards an era where it may eventually sell access to Windows or its services as part of a subscription, in the same way it has started to do so for its Office 365 service.
    I don't really fear this. As we move to more device types, it would be nice to have an account rather than a perpetual software license.

    Not too mention, you could add and remove services as you need them. Would be nice when you need something for a few weeks, but don't want to pay for permanent use.
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  9. #59


    Posts : 1,770
    Windows Phone 6, Windows CE 5, Windows Vista x32, Windows 7 x32/x64, Windows 8 x64


    Quote Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
    I don't really fear this. As we move to more device types, it would be nice to have an account rather than a perpetual software license.

    Not too mention, you could add and remove services as you need them. Would be nice when you need something for a few weeks, but don't want to pay for permanent use.
    In theory, that sentiment may be good, but in practice, it won't work like that. At the end of the day, you'll be paying a lot more than you do now and potentially with some inconvenience. No one provides subscription models because it's for the benefit of the consumer.
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  10. #60


    Ohio
    Posts : 473
    Windows 8 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    Hello Windows 3.11!
    Yes, and DOS 6.22
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Windows Blue poised to become Windows 8.1
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