Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Educators Across the US Adopt Windows 8 to Help Make Stude

  1. #11


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by cluberti View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
    LOL.

    That is one of the ways MS keeps their monopoly.
    There's no such thing as a free market in the US, just like the US isn't a "free country" - it's nice to say, and it's nice to believe, but it doesn't exist as such. Also, to be fair Apple gives away millions of dollars of hardware and software to school systems all over the US as well (and has since I was in school, 30+ years ago - it's not a new thing at all ). I don't remember seeing Microsoft software in wide use in public schools until recently (last 5-6 years), but that may just be my experience and not typical. I am simply guessing this is just Microsoft taking a page from Apple's playbook.
    Microsoft has been in public schools since the mid to late '90s and forward...

    Mostly because using apple products would break the school district's bank.

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #12


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
    Thanks - best laugh I have had in while.
    Can't provide a product that can be used as a proper alternative to Office or Windows? Kind of just proved my point here...
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #13


    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    Microsoft has been offering deals like that for years, so that they virtually embed their products into such organisations. Enterprise customers have a deal where employees can purchase the complete Office Professional suite for about $15 (I've been able to do so), which locks in a huge number of consumers to Microsoft's products. It costs Microsoft virtually nothing, but maintains a huge userbase. Then there are all the student discounts etc. Mind you others do that as well, such as Adobe.
    I've always been annoyed by the massive price discrepancies myself. Like you said, Home Use Program for Office makes a $400 product $9.99 to $19.99. Technet provides tons of software for $200. Dreamspark is free for students. But then for regular adults, we get $200 copies of Windows, $129 to $399 for a copy of Office, etc.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #14


    Redmond
    Posts : 651
    Windows 8.1 x64


    Quote Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
    I've always been annoyed by the massive price discrepancies myself. Like you said, Home Use Program for Office makes a $400 product $9.99 to $19.99. Technet provides tons of software for $200. Dreamspark is free for students. But then for regular adults, we get $200 copies of Windows, $129 to $399 for a copy of Office, etc.
    • Home Use program is covered by a business' VL agreement with Microsoft, which contains a LOT of other costs - you're getting the software at cost, yes, but there was a lot of money transacted to get you that right. Microsoft is still making some cash on the deal, and you're using their products (call it subversive marketing, perhaps).
    • As to the TechNet software, that is NOT for production use, only testing. Testing shouldn't be expensive, or no one would test the real thing, nor purchase it (or be far less likely to).
    • Dreamspark is free because students usually aren't well off financially, and getting someone to use your product when they're impressionable is one of the hallmarks of marketing - it's why you see things in schools, to market to students so that they'll use it when they do purchase.
    • If you're going to use the software, purchasing retail is quite expensive (per unit, of course) compared to volume licensing, OEM copies, and such - partly because retail is the smallest market for software (by far), and partially because Microsoft is trying to push it's cloud Office365 offerings over boxed (virtual or physical) Office software. The pricing is meant to drive behavior here, I believe.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #15


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    Microsoft has been offering deals like that for years, so that they virtually embed their products into such organisations. Enterprise customers have a deal where employees can purchase the complete Office Professional suite for about $15 (I've been able to do so), which locks in a huge number of consumers to Microsoft's products. It costs Microsoft virtually nothing, but maintains a huge userbase. Then there are all the student discounts etc. Mind you others do that as well, such as Adobe.
    I've always been annoyed by the massive price discrepancies myself. Like you said, Home Use Program for Office makes a $400 product $9.99 to $19.99. Technet provides tons of software for $200. Dreamspark is free for students. But then for regular adults, we get $200 copies of Windows, $129 to $399 for a copy of Office, etc.
    Ahhh, the joys of being grown up....
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #16


    Posts : 5,360
    7/8/ubuntu/Linux Deepin


    cluberti

    There's no such thing as a free market in the US
    LOL. You have a point, but nobody is expecting it to be perfect.

    They should teach the basics in schools. Sadly , it is evident from some of the responses on this thread that at least one person hasn't a clue. I don't know how widespread that is.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #17


    Redmond
    Posts : 651
    Windows 8.1 x64


    It depends on your point of view, but I would agree that students are under-taught some of the more basic things we were taught in the 70s and 80s due to the insistence on government that math and science are the most important things. Because of how the system works (I have many relatives who work in public schools across the US, from teachers to administrators) and how it's rewarded (or chastised, as the case may be), emphasis is thus put VERY heavily on whatever the state or federal levels dictate is important, and other things are left to the wayside. I find my nephews (who just graduated this year) have a decent handle on their math skills, and their science skills aren't as bad - however, their language skills, history knowledge, and general all-around knowledge (they didn't take shop, home ec, typing, or any advanced history or government classes as they weren't offered - nor would there have been adequate time given the strong curricular emphasis on math and science courses). Unfortunately, we've lost sight in the US that schools are for *education*, which includes a rounded courseload, because students learn not only course materials, but *how to learn* if they get a good education. This has been lost in the drive to cram as many math and science formulas into their heads, and the misguided notion that this will somehow make the students "better". Whatever that means - it isn't working on almost any level of success.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #18


    Quote Originally Posted by cluberti View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
    I've always been annoyed by the massive price discrepancies myself. Like you said, Home Use Program for Office makes a $400 product $9.99 to $19.99. Technet provides tons of software for $200. Dreamspark is free for students. But then for regular adults, we get $200 copies of Windows, $129 to $399 for a copy of Office, etc.
    • Home Use program is covered by a business' VL agreement with Microsoft, which contains a LOT of other costs - you're getting the software at cost, yes, but there was a lot of money transacted to get you that right. Microsoft is still making some cash on the deal, and you're using their products (call it subversive marketing, perhaps).
    • As to the TechNet software, that is NOT for production use, only testing. Testing shouldn't be expensive, or no one would test the real thing, nor purchase it (or be far less likely to).
    • Dreamspark is free because students usually aren't well off financially, and getting someone to use your product when they're impressionable is one of the hallmarks of marketing - it's why you see things in schools, to market to students so that they'll use it when they do purchase.
    • If you're going to use the software, purchasing retail is quite expensive (per unit, of course) compared to volume licensing, OEM copies, and such - partly because retail is the smallest market for software (by far), and partially because Microsoft is trying to push it's cloud Office365 offerings over boxed (virtual or physical) Office software. The pricing is meant to drive behavior here, I believe.
    Understood all of that. I've administered the Home Use Program for 2 different companies. While there are a lot of costs on the business side, the benefit for the employee side is huge. And it leads some employees to thinking that Microsoft Office is naturally cheap and they think that everybody should own it.

    I know Technet is NOT for production use. But I'd bet dollars to donuts that many who won Technet subs around here (and anywhere), are using these OS licenses and Office licenses on their computers at home.

    Dreamspark...yes I understand that too. But I was broke when I was in college and took out lots of loans and it took me over 10 years to pay them off. It's just a kick in the nuts when students can get something for an absurdly low price and a person who is unemployed and trying to get back into the workforce has to pay $100-$400 for the same software.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #19


    Posts : 5,360
    7/8/ubuntu/Linux Deepin


    Cluberti
    the misguided notion that this will somehow make the students "better". Whatever that means - it isn't working on almost any level of success.
    Not too different in the UK nowadays.

    Illustrated by Trevor Nunn sitting the A level shakespeare paper and only scoring a B.

    Very few marks for thinking or ideas - mostly for parrotting out the "expected" points.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #20


    USA, Idaho
    Posts : 1,062
    Win 8, (VM win7, XP, Vista)


    Quote Originally Posted by cluberti View Post
    It depends on your point of view, but I would agree that students are under-taught some of the more basic things we were taught in the 70s and 80s due to the insistence on government that math and science are the most important things. Because of how the system works (I have many relatives who work in public schools across the US, from teachers to administrators) and how it's rewarded (or chastised, as the case may be), emphasis is thus put VERY heavily on whatever the state or federal levels dictate is important, and other things are left to the wayside. I find my nephews (who just graduated this year) have a decent handle on their math skills, and their science skills aren't as bad - however, their language skills, history knowledge, and general all-around knowledge (they didn't take shop, home ec, typing, or any advanced history or government classes as they weren't offered - nor would there have been adequate time given the strong curricular emphasis on math and science courses). Unfortunately, we've lost sight in the US that schools are for *education*, which includes a rounded courseload, because students learn not only course materials, but *how to learn* if they get a good education. This has been lost in the drive to cram as many math and science formulas into their heads, and the misguided notion that this will somehow make the students "better". Whatever that means - it isn't working on almost any level of success.
    . . .and nothing changes. Heard the same thing back in the fifties, sixties, seventies, etc.. A student will usually decide (right or wrong) what it is he/she will learn the most. Most colleges today require a new student to either pass a grammar, and writing test or take English Lit 101. Also, depending on what your career choice is you may have to retake some of the classes you thought you were through with in Senior High School.
    It's not just the student and the teacher it is also the parent/s.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Educators Across the US Adopt Windows 8 to Help Make Stude
Related Threads
Will Windows 10 make it in Windows 8 News
Windows 10: Can Microsoft get it right this time? | ZDNet
I installed some software and didn't make it, 'admin', so now every time I start it, it asks for permission to allow it to modify W8.1 My question; Is there a way to change it now, after it's already installed?
So, you want to adopt BYOD? in Windows 8 News
Here is a pretty decent article on BYOD Source
Previously when I was using Windows 7, the system restore points were created automatically whenever I installed a new SW or made other similar system change. But it seems not the case in Win 8 any more. I am a SW developer. Although I normally test our SW on virtual machines, but some other...
Make Way for Windows 8 in Windows 8 News
Source I'm just a ---- disturber ;) Discuss :D A Guy
Read more at: Which Windows will make for a better tablet? | ZDNet
Eight Forums Android App Eight Forums IOS App Follow us on Facebook