Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Chromebooks vs Windows

  1. #81


    South Coast NSW, Australia
    Posts : 615
    Windows 8.1 'Ultimate' RTM 64 bit (Pro/WMC).


    I have Office 2007 on the older laptop, and Office 2010 on this one. I have no intention of ever subscribing to cloud software, so will be running these until the hardware no longer supports them. I couldn't care less about Office 360 or any other 'web-only software', and have about the same level of interest in Chromebooks. I want my OSes and programs as hard copies, that do not need the internet to be useable.

    Wenda.

    Edit: - I was playing around with my WfW 3.11 setup earlier, and strangely(?), Office 4.3 still does the job just fine, 17-odd years later.
    Office 2007/10 should be useable for at least that long.
    And by then, I'll be gone, and won't care.

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #82


    You do not need office to get office 365. It's a full blown suite you get access to, on 5 computers for $100 a year. You have to download the suite and install locally, and you cannot pick which office apps to install to save space, you must install them all.

    The cloud part is just that skydive is default save location.

    But, if on a cafe machine or something without office, you can run a browser based version of these apps if you have a subscription. These versions are more feature full than the freebie web versions we have now.

    If you let your sub expire, your apps go to read only mode. Your data is always available to you.

    Oh yeah 365 gets you 20 more gb of free space in skydive.

    Hope this helps with the confusion. It really is a good deal if you need the whole suite on more than one computer.
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  3. #83


    Posts : 959
    Windows 8.1, 10


    Quote Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
    It really is a good deal if you need the whole suite on more than one computer.
    I must admit I saw the pricing for Office 365 subscription and was tempted. The big thing for me would be that Access and Outlook are (if I read it right) included in the Home subscription.

    I imagine that MS are pricing it that way to tempt people into the subscription model, especially as old versions of Office meet many people's needs for many years after MS would like them to upgrade, so they aren't making so much money from them.

    There's no guarantee that next year's subscription rates will be as cheap, of course...
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  4. #84


    Pricing is VERY tempting. And yes, you do get access and outlook. It more or less equates to the $400 professional plus suite, but is allowed on 5 computers rather than 1.

    And it always keeps you on the latest version.

    If you are a home user with 1 computer and you need word, excel and PowerPoint only, then you are probably better off buying 1 copy of home and student and being done with it.

    But if you need more of the apps and have multiple pc's, thus is almost a no brainer. If it is not compelling, you are most likely pirating office, or using TechNet (albeit in a non intended function).
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  5. #85


    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    I think it's a little too soon to decide the fate on Windows RT as it's a new Windows variant running on few devices, most of which aren't under 600 dollars.
    I just think when given a choice between full windows or RT, Windows people are going to want full windows. Thus far, the RT has not sold well, and of those who did buy, many were really surprised to find out their existing software didn't work. I have read numerous times that many were returned, although I can find nothing really official on this.


    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    But again, you get more out of a Windows RT tablet than you do a chromebook, so there is a justification for a higher price than 250 dollars.
    Yes, it's going to cost more than $250. It does do more and has touchscreen technology and a smaller form factor...so that's fine. I have no qualms with that.


    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    Microsoft is going to be pushing Office 365 going forward, as if you take a gander at their price sheet for the 2013 software out of subscription, it's pretty steep, it's pirated more than anything but is their hugest cash cow, so a hybrid subscription of local software along with cloud support is a good setup that will probably satisfy a huge demographic of Office users. One hundred dollars for 5 PCs for like a year and a grace period? That's 20 dollars per PC per year, and being able to easily upgrade to the latest Office version without issue. That's such a good deal, it's theft!
    This has always been a sore spot with me and Microsoft and that is license costs. For so many areas, the cost of Windows itself or the cost of Office is very high. But yet, they have programs like the Microsoft Home Use Program where people can get a $400 office suite for $10-$20. A copy of Windows 7 Professional retail was nearly $300, but yet for a $200 subscription to Technet, you got handfuls of licenses (which I know are supposed to be for testing and not actual use...but lots of people use Technet for their own personal use).

    I wish there wasn't so much discrepancy in these prices. Make it reasonably priced and affordable to many and your likelihood for piracy drops. I think this new Office 365 model will make paying for Office far more palatable for many.

    Quote Originally Posted by R0bR View Post
    So we have the tech media that bash Surface RT because you can't install desktop apps, can only install Store apps, not enough apps and not enough value for the money. Yet they praise these Chromebooks that you can't install desktop apps, my understanding is they don't run Google Store apps so they don't have enough apps but they are worth the money?

    Looking online the price range of these Chromebooks are $200 - $400 and that gets you some hardware that runs a browser. All my devices have a browser, I have a browser on my Surface, on my phone, on my Xbox, my desktop, my ultrabook...heck TV's even come with browsers. There isn't anything that a Chromebook can do that I can't do with my Surface, but I can do more with my Surface than these things can.
    Yes, you can do more with a Surface. My Chromebook with a keyboard was $249, and a surface RT with a keyboard is $600. So, it better do more.

    I like the Chromebook because of the form factor. Touch does not appeal to me, a real keyboard does, and this device for $249 suits my ability to do the stuff that I more or less do on the web from home in the evenings. It's not a replacement for my Windows laptop, it's just a supplemental device. I cannot VPN in from the Chromebook I cannot install games on the Chromebook, I cannot install Windows based apps to the Chromebook. There are lots of things that I cannot do. But I can surf the web, I can do facebook, I can read my Gmail, I can post on these forums, I can type fast on a real keyboard, I can transfer things off via USB 3.0, I can read media cards, I can output 1080p via HDMI, I can watch YouTube videos...and these are the things that I do the most when "I" personally am sitting around at home.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm not trying to say the Chromebook is the be-all end-all device and it's the best device for everybody. I'm simply stating that for what I am doing, and the price of the Chromebook, I feel 100% satisfied with it. It is what it is.


    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    By the way, I think it was pparks that said it earlier that the chromebook boots up in seconds, resumes from sleep in a few. A Windows RT device resumes from sleep in that same time, boot time is a bit longer. On a Windows 8 PC though, it's pretty much the same. RT has connected standby, and when Intel and AMD get their poop in a group and deliver connected standby ready chips, they will get that as well. Of course, this is on SSD based storage for the boot times and such. But I've seen somewhat similar times even on a hard drive with Windows 8.... So....
    I never said that the Chromebook was the only device that did this. The fast boot up times was just another check in the "pros" column for the Chromebook for me. For $249, I have a device with a laptop form factor, that's just about the size of a MacBook Air, that allows me to quickly and easily respond to this post without being a hassle. I can easily cut and paste, I can put the cursor exactly where I want it, I can type a whole lot faster on the physical keyboard. I "could" have used my Samsung Galaxy S3 for this post, I could have used my Asus Transformer tablet...but it would have been a lot more cumbursome to do all of this inline quoting and cutting certain things and typing up my long winded responses. On the Chromebook, it was just as easy as it would have been on my Windows laptop.


    Quote Originally Posted by Wenda View Post
    I have Office 2007 on the older laptop, and Office 2010 on this one. I have no intention of ever subscribing to cloud software, so will be running these until the hardware no longer supports them. I couldn't care less about Office 360 or any other 'web-only software', and have about the same level of interest in Chromebooks. I want my OSes and programs as hard copies, that do not need the internet to be useable.
    Wenda,

    You have responded emotionally to Office 365 and have discounted it because of the cloud implications. You have missed the point that these apps don't "run from the cloud", you do install them, physically onto your computer. They give you a $400 office suite license that can be run on 5 computers rather than just 1. You only need internet access to sign up for the program, and download the suite. If you choose to store your files in Skydrive, you would need internet access for that. But you can save locally too without needing Internet access.

    For the price, at $100 a year, if you have multiple Windows PC's and you want the Office suite and you want to be legal on your licensing, this Office 365 subscription model is quite reasonable. Nearly a no-brainer as far as I am concerned. Unless you only need Word or Excel, or have access to the Microsoft Home Use Program...you won't get this much Office for this little.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #86


    Germany/Florida
    Posts : 4,514
    Vista and Win7


    Chromebook on the roll

    The Chromebook has recently pushed by Google's core Android partners---notably Samsung. But suddenly there's some volume coming Google's way. First, Asus noted that the Chromebook accounted to 5 percent to 10 percent of volume. And that volume came during the Windows 8 launch.

    Now there's HP, which leaked specs of its Chromebook effort on Friday, and later launched the $330 laptop. In a PDF, HP noted:
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #87


    Posts : 1,770
    Windows Phone 6, Windows CE 5, Windows Vista x32, Windows 7 x32/x64, Windows 8 x64


    Here's another interesting development:

    Alexandre Julliard, the developer behind the Wine compatibility layer, gave an update about an ARM-friendly flavor of the software and showed off a version that runs on Android at the 2013 Free and Open source Software Developers' European Meeting. According to Phoronix, the demo of a Windows app running on Android was "horrendously slow," but Julliard chalks that up to the fact that the sample was chugging along on an Android emulator. Wine for Mountain View's OS is said to be an active work-in-progress, so there's no word on when it might find its way into the wild just yet.
    Wine coming to Android, will run Windows apps on Google's mobile OS
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  8. #88


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    Here's another interesting development:

    Alexandre Julliard, the developer behind the Wine compatibility layer, gave an update about an ARM-friendly flavor of the software and showed off a version that runs on Android at the 2013 Free and Open source Software Developers' European Meeting. According to Phoronix, the demo of a Windows app running on Android was "horrendously slow," but Julliard chalks that up to the fact that the sample was chugging along on an Android emulator. Wine for Mountain View's OS is said to be an active work-in-progress, so there's no word on when it might find its way into the wild just yet.
    Wine coming to Android, will run Windows apps on Google's mobile OS
    That's interesting, but I'd imagine that android device would need a good quad core processor a good amount of RAM to run it without being lethargic like first gen android tablets were.

    I would imagine that soon, someone will have an x86 emulator running on Windows RT. I haven't heard any progress updates about that but last that was heard was that a Russian developer had about 80 percent or so of x86 coded emulated on RT. There is also BlueStacks that should run on x86 based Windows tablets, not sure if Windows RT will get that, so one could run icky android apps.

    I'd like to see this in action though.
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  9. #89


    Posts : 959
    Windows 8.1, 10


    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    After going through this: Office 365 is Secure, Anywhere Access to Your Online Office and this System Requirements for Office 365, I'm rather perplexed as to what Office 365 really delivers.
    Just to add to the perplexity the page you linked to, which I'm guessing is the Australian version of the page, here ( www.microsoft.com/en-au/office365/system-requirements.aspx ) says:
    Office 365 system requirements

    To get the full Office 365 experience, we recommend that customers meet our system prerequisites. Minimum requirements for Office 365 include Office 2007+, IE 7+, Windows XP SP3+ (see full requirement list below).
    Operating systems requirements
    Windows XP SP3
    Windows Vista SP2
    Windows 7
    Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard), 10.6 (Snow Leopard)
    Windows Server 2003
    Windows Server 2008

    Office client requirements

    Office 2007 SP2 or Office 2010
    Office 2008 for Mac & Entourage 2008 Web Services Edition
    Office 2011 for Mac and Outlook 2011 for Mac
    .NET 2.0 or later
    Lync 2010
    But by changing 2 characters in the URL to the en-gb version (www.microsoft.com/en-gb/office365/system-requirements.aspx), it says:
    System requirements

    To get the full Office 365 experience, we recommend that customers meet our system prerequisites. Minimum requirements for Office 365 include Office 2007+, IE 8+ and Windows 7 (see full requirement list below).
    Operating system requirements
    Windows 8
    Windows 7
    Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard), 10.6 (Snow Leopard), 10.7 (Lion)
    Windows Server 2012
    Windows Server 2008

    Support Ending
    Windows Server 2003 on January 1, 2013
    Windows XP on January 1, 2014 (currently requires SP3)
    Windows Vista on January 1, 2014 (currently requires SP2)

    Office client requirements

    Office 2010 SP1
    Service Pack 1 must be deployed by June 1, 2012
    Office 2007 SP2
    Office 2011 for Mac and Outlook 2011 for Mac
    Outlook 2003 via POP and IMAP only
    Get additional information about connecting to Office 365 via POP/IMAP and Outlook 2003.
    .NET 2.0 or later
    Lync 2010

    Support Ending
    Office 2008 for Mac on April 9, 2013
    Entourage 2008 Web Services Edition on April 9, 2013
    Outlook 2003 on April 8, 2014
    I note that:
    a) the requirements seem to be different depending which country you're in
    b) some of these days are in the past, which suggests that in both cases it might be an out-of-date web page
    c) the end dates for XP and Vista on the en-gb page are 1 January 2014, even though both operating systems are still supported after that date (by quite some time in the case of Vista)

    So I am wondering... if I had Vista and subscribed to Office 365, would it just stop working on 1 January 2014 even though I'd paid for my year and the operating system was still in support.
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  10. #90


    Posts : 835
    Win 8.1 Pro


    I have no idea why it says you need Office 2007, but I can tell you that it (at least) Office 365 2013 does not.

    This is probably what you should be looking at...

    Office System Requirements - Office.com
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