Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Chromebooks vs Windows

  1. #71


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    Theoretically, but at this point in time, SMS messages basically just get sent in 160 character chunks. They don't actually get cut off anymore like they used to. The most that happens is if for example, you sent a giant text message; it would do somethi

    ng like this. You'll get the second chunk of the message right after the first.
    And then you get charged for two SMS messages.
    Theoretically, if you have a texting plan on your carrier where you're charged per text or are limited. Here in the States, pretty much everyone with a smartphone has some type of unlimited texting plan with their talk and data plan. I find that preposterous however, to be charged per text. It's basically small itty bitty bits of data that doesn't even compare to voice data. I remember back then like a decade ago where texting plans used to cost a pretty penny, which I never understood seeing as it's so trivial and everyone was basically getting ripped off if they were paying steeply for texting. But we were all getting ripped off back then, pretty much are getting ripped off still though...

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  2. #72


    Posts : 1,770
    Windows Phone 6, Windows CE 5, Windows Vista x32, Windows 7 x32/x64, Windows 8 x64


    [QUOTE=Coke Robot;188655]
    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    Honestly, chrome OS sounds more like Windows RT Lite than anything. It has a few features and benefits that Windows RT has, except the vast majority of anything is done through some online service like Pandora or YouTube.
    Microsoft's preferred modus operandi with Office 365 is for everything to happen in 'the cloud' in SkyDrive. I think this is a step to try and get everyone to become used to off-line programs and storage for everything. The Chromebook is effectively leading the push in many respects. It's a bit like thin-client that has been pushed for decades and which Microsoft has fought tooth and nail against. I hate it, but it seems that this is the way things are going whether you like it or not.
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  3. #73


    Posts : 1,770
    Windows Phone 6, Windows CE 5, Windows Vista x32, Windows 7 x32/x64, Windows 8 x64


    [QUOTE=Coke Robot;188664]
    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    Theoretically, if you have a texting plan on your carrier where you're charged per text or are limited. Here in the States, pretty much everyone with a smartphone has some type of unlimited texting plan with their talk and data plan. I find that preposterous however, to be charged per text. It's basically small itty bitty bits of data that doesn't even compare to voice data. I remember back then like a decade ago where texting plans used to cost a pretty penny, which I never understood seeing as it's so trivial and everyone was basically getting ripped off if they were paying steeply for texting. But we were all getting ripped off back then, pretty much are getting ripped off still though...
    In Australia, we're ripped off constantly.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #74


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    [QUOTE=Ray8;188665]
    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    Honestly, chrome OS sounds more like Windows RT Lite than anything. It has a few features and benefits that Windows RT has, except the vast majority of anything is done through some online service like Pandora or YouTube.
    Microsoft's preferred modus operandi with Office 365 is for everything to happen in 'the cloud' in SkyDrive. I think this is a step to try and get everyone to become used to off-line programs and storage for everything. The Chromebook is effectively leading the push in many respects. It's a bit like thin-client that has been pushed for decades and which Microsoft has fought tooth and nail against. I hate it, but it seems that this is the way things are going whether you like it or not.
    The difference between using google docs as a client to the cloud server and Office 365 is the fact that you have the Office software locally installed onto your PC, the FULL FLEDGED suite if I'm correct. You get five PCs for a year on like a 100 dollar basis, and you get free upgrades to the latest version as well. I doubt Microsoft would add that in as a benefit to 365 users, being able to upgrade for free, if they were going towards a pure cloud based service. I think Office 2013 and 365 are the perfect hybrid of cloud service and local software, you basically can pick and choose if you want to be full on in the Office cloud with the Web Apps, or be pure and simple and stay local with the software.
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  5. #75


    Posts : 534
    Windows 7, Windows 8 RP


    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    I haven't heard any review bashing RT because you can't run Office programs, it does come with a truncated version of the Office suite designed for RT afterall. But what can a Chromebook do? A fair bit apparently (click through the tabs): Features of Chromebooks.
    I didn't say Office, I said desktop apps, I know it runs a flavour of Office I have one. Looking at those features it doesn't do anything that other devices can't already do because it's all browser based.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #76


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    [QUOTE=Ray8;188666]
    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    Theoretically, if you have a texting plan on your carrier where you're charged per text or are limited. Here in the States, pretty much everyone with a smartphone has some type of unlimited texting plan with their talk and data plan. I find that preposterous however, to be charged per text. It's basically small itty bitty bits of data that doesn't even compare to voice data. I remember back then like a decade ago where texting plans used to cost a pretty penny, which I never understood seeing as it's so trivial and everyone was basically getting ripped off if they were paying steeply for texting. But we were all getting ripped off back then, pretty much are getting ripped off still though...
    In Australia, we're ripped off constantly.
    Until you pay about 100 dollars US monthly for calling, texting, and internet use (a mere 3-4 gigs) that costs almost more than double for what you pay for monthly home internet service where it's basically an internet data buffet, oh wow....

    This is what got me fed up recently with contracts. I ended up cutting and running from att as paying 85 dollars a month for phone service I don't use heavily, and data usage I don't use heavily (the most I've ever used was about two out of three gigs, that was one time, I usually do about 1.5 gigs) and pay more for that than I do, literally than a two tanks of gas or a tank of gas and my home internet bill. So I'm doing prepaid for now on, I'll be saving about 600 dollars every two years versus contracts.

    Those bags.
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  7. #77


    Posts : 1,770
    Windows Phone 6, Windows CE 5, Windows Vista x32, Windows 7 x32/x64, Windows 8 x64


    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    The difference between using google docs as a client to the cloud server and Office 365 is the fact that you have the Office software locally installed onto your PC, the FULL FLEDGED suite if I'm correct. You get five PCs for a year on like a 100 dollar basis, and you get free upgrades to the latest version as well. I doubt Microsoft would add that in as a benefit to 365 users, being able to upgrade for free, if they were going towards a pure cloud based service. I think Office 2013 and 365 are the perfect hybrid of cloud service and local software, you basically can pick and choose if you want to be full on in the Office cloud with the Web Apps, or be pure and simple and stay local with the software.
    After going through this: Office 365 is Secure, Anywhere Access to Your Online Office and this System Requirements for Office 365, I'm rather perplexed as to what Office 365 really delivers.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #78


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    The difference between using google docs as a client to the cloud server and Office 365 is the fact that you have the Office software locally installed onto your PC, the FULL FLEDGED suite if I'm correct. You get five PCs for a year on like a 100 dollar basis, and you get free upgrades to the latest version as well. I doubt Microsoft would add that in as a benefit to 365 users, being able to upgrade for free, if they were going towards a pure cloud based service. I think Office 2013 and 365 are the perfect hybrid of cloud service and local software, you basically can pick and choose if you want to be full on in the Office cloud with the Web Apps, or be pure and simple and stay local with the software.
    After going through this: Office 365 is Secure, Anywhere Access to Your Online Office and this System Requirements for Office 365, I'm rather perplexed as to what Office 365 really delivers.
    This wouldn't be a first time something from Microsoft has been perplexing.

    Basically, the simplest explanation I've come across is basically you have the Office 2013 apps installed on your PC, except you pay a year long subscription service to use that on five different PCs, and you get free software updates with it. You will get I think 25 gigs of SkyDrive storage or I think it was 25 gigs of Outlook email storage for small businesses or some such. You have access to the Office Web Apps as well.

    The branding is just weird. If you buy Office 2013, you're basically buying just the software suite to use infinitely until you die as normal. Office 365 is like buying the 2013 suite, except you use it on five PCs for about 100 dollars a year depending on your usage scenario/environment. The year long subscription will expire, which will require a renewal. You'll have a 30 day grace period to renew. I think the Office apps, if they're not renewed, will just become document readers.

    If you want a definitive benefit, it's the pricing that is the best thing there. If you install Office on several PCs that you use, this will end up saving you gobs of money in the long run, considering if you update your Office version each time there is an updated one.
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  9. #79


    Posts : 1,770
    Windows Phone 6, Windows CE 5, Windows Vista x32, Windows 7 x32/x64, Windows 8 x64


    The way I read it is that you need at least Office 2007 installed, before you can subscribe to Office 365. This seems to be reinforced by the following:

    Office 365 adds more power to the Office you already know and use by making it easier to communicate and collaborate with others.

    You can use Office 365 with many versions of Office or even without Office on your computer. Select Office 365 plans include subscriptions to the latest version of Office.
    Also, if you don't have a suitable version of Office already installed, all you can get is online Office, which are basically web apps (like Chrome):

    Office Web Apps Brings Microsoft Office Online - Office 365
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  10. #80


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    The way I read it is that you need at least Office 2007 installed, before you can subscribe to Office 365. This seems to be reinforced by the following:

    Office 365 adds more power to the Office you already know and use by making it easier to communicate and collaborate with others.

    You can use Office 365 with many versions of Office or even without Office on your computer. Select Office 365 plans include subscriptions to the latest version of Office.
    Also, if you don't have a suitable version of Office already installed, all you can get is online Office, which are basically web apps (like Chrome):

    Office Web Apps Brings Microsoft Office Online - Office 365
    I think that might be so you can upgrade. I know that Office 2010 right now, if you buy it within a certain time frame, you get a free upgrade to 2013. That might be applicable to 2007 SP2, but I doubt it. Not too sure why that's there, but Office 365 right now is centered with Office 2013. I believe 365 was released initially with Office 2010....
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