Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Why Microsoft redesigned Windows

  1. #11


    Posts : 636
    Windows 7/8


    Yeah, the redesign is appreciated, but treating the desktop like a tablet has got to be the biggest computer UI design blunder of the century. :/

    In fact, even though I am a complete Microsoft/Windows geek and frankly dislike Google rather passionately. I STILL ended up buying a new Android phone for xmas. That's how much Windows 8, even on a phone, doesn't work for me On the desktop? Non-starter. Sigh.

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  2. #12


    Posts : 4
    Windows 8


    Yes, the question is indeed, "Why?" I have had my Asus Vivobook for 3 days now. It's a great looking, very portable little notebook with a nice touchscreen. I wish I could love it, but, I have yet to understand why this is supposed to be an improvement over Windows 7. I have a Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1. Apps make sense on a tablet. I don't see the reason for "apps" on a pc. And I have lost my POP3 mail, the functionality of the Windows Live photo gallery. The music and video players are buggy. Maybe I have more to learn. Maybe the kinks will be worked out. But, I end up still wondering why?
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  3. #13


    Posts : 162
    Windows 8 Pro


    They needed something to do.
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  4. #14


    Posts : 1,770
    Windows Phone 6, Windows CE 5, Windows Vista x32, Windows 7 x32/x64, Windows 8 x64


    I can see value in apps on a desktop, as they can be nifty little information sources, which hopefully are not resource intensive. The same applies to Windows tablets/notebooks/laptops that act as full blown portable desktops. But the apps should be adjustable and flexible, to suit the greater real estate of tablets/notebooks/laptops and desktop monitor/s, which is where Microsoft has stumbled badly and made it a 'one hat fits all' situation. They got so lost in 'social' aspects of their new OS and forgot about those who aren't on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc all day long.
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  5. #15


    Posts : 120
    Windows 8.1 + StartIsBack + AeroGlass


    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    That 200 million/year cash cow of desktop/notebook sales is looking pretty good. Even at $5 per licence and assuming 90% of sales is Microsoft, that's almost $1 billion per year. You wouldn't want to kill that just for a merry looking start menu.
    If Vista taught them something is that they can release an operating system with the worst possible reception and still make shitloads of money and lose little ground to competitors (competitors? what competitors?). Their stronghold on their traditional markets is just too strong. The way I see it, they're risking very little.
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  6. #16


    Hafnarfjörður IS
    Posts : 4,376
    Linux Centos 7, W8.1, W7, W2K3 Server W10


    Hi there
    Agree absolutely with Ray8

    I can't be bothered with "Farcebook", "Twatting" on Twitter or even Texting -- I probably only send ONE TEXT a year and it's probably "Happy Xmas" to my mum.!!!!

    Apps on a phone are fine -- on a desktop they should be more like "Gadgets" and certainly this whole "Metro style "Full screen" or the even more Bonkers "Half screen" is totally stupid when you've got nice HUGE monitors.

    For tablet and Phones -- absolutely NO ISSUE at all with W8 --- for a desktop (even if I'm on a "Laptop") the traditional OS approach with a proper hierarchical menu system and a decently customisable desktop the W7 approach is FAR superior IMO.

    The whole concept of "The Store" is flawed for serious Windows apps -- would you expect to install Adobe CS6 suite (extended) -- the Full suite -- via the "App store" -- Think not somehow.

    There are features in W8 that I like -- slick performance, enhanced security (actually very very good security --you don't really need any 3rd party AV stuff any more for a HOME installation of W8), better driver and update management, Virtual ISO mounting etc etc -- so it's a shame Ms didn't offer at installation time the "traditional" or "Metro" Gui depending on your requirements.

    Some of the 3rd party stuff out there on attempting to replicate the W7 type of menuing system shows that it wouldn't have been difficult for Ms to implement this.

    What is actually even more BONKERS is that W2012 server (essentially similar to W8) actually has an option "Desktop experience" at install time which has the same Metro interface as W8 itself -- now I don't know how a lot of I.T is managed these days but 'm sure the guys who manage servers etc won't be using METRO apps to control and monitor their servers. !!!

    Cheers
    jimbo
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  7. #17


    Posts : 1,770
    Windows Phone 6, Windows CE 5, Windows Vista x32, Windows 7 x32/x64, Windows 8 x64


    Quote Originally Posted by mcnulty View Post
    If Vista taught them something is that they can release an operating system with the worst possible reception and still make shitloads of money and lose little ground to competitors (competitors? what competitors?). Their stronghold on their traditional markets is just too strong. The way I see it, they're risking very little.
    There have been many seemingly invincible companies throughout history that have fallen badly, and even disappeared, because of a simple, yet bad, decision. Think of Kodak (failed to acknowledge the digital age), Sun Microsystems (growth of powerful PCs), Sony (poor hardware/software decisions) and so on.

    I have no idea what Microsoft sees as their future, but the commentary that Windows 8 has generated seems to indicate that they have alienated a very large percentage of their traditional userbase. The fact that so much tension is evident on a pure tech site, needs to be extrapolated to the larger populace that is far less tech savvy.

    One wrong step and Microsoft risks everything.
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  8. #18


    Posts : 120
    Windows 8.1 + StartIsBack + AeroGlass


    Quote Originally Posted by Ray8 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mcnulty View Post
    If Vista taught them something is that they can release an operating system with the worst possible reception and still make shitloads of money and lose little ground to competitors (competitors? what competitors?). Their stronghold on their traditional markets is just too strong. The way I see it, they're risking very little.
    There have been many seemingly invincible companies throughout history that have fallen badly, and even disappeared, because of a simple, yet bad, decision. Think of Kodak (failed to acknowledge the digital age), Sun Microsystems (growth of powerful PCs), Sony (poor hardware/software decisions) and so on.

    I have no idea what Microsoft sees as their future, but the commentary that Windows 8 has generated seems to indicate that they have alienated a very large percentage of their traditional userbase. The fact that so much tension is evident on a pure tech site, needs to be extrapolated to the larger populace that is far less tech savvy.

    One wrong step and Microsoft risks everything.
    I see your point, but my opinion is that Microsoft probably thinks getting behind in the mobile race is far riskier for them in the long run than alienating their userbase. If there is a small chance that doing that improves their chances in the mobile space, they probably think it's worth trying.

    At least, I'm really hoping that's the case, because if Microsoft really thinks that Metro is the future of computing regardless of device and environment, I'm out of words to describe my dismay.
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  9. #19


    Quote Originally Posted by mcnulty View Post

    I see your point, but my opinion is that Microsoft probably thinks getting behind in the mobile race is far riskier for them in the long run than alienating their userbase. If there is a small chance that doing that improves their chances in the mobile space, they probably think it's worth trying.

    At least, I'm really hoping that's the case, because if Microsoft really thinks that Metro is the future of computing regardless of device and environment, I'm out of words to describe my dismay.
    By using metro I know now not to buy any of Windows mobile devises and stick with Android or Fruit company products even they know better than to mix desktops with mobile stuff. Cnet has an article about adding the start menu in desktop the din is getting really loud if Microsoft does not listen now somebody will take there place. I used to be in the silent group not now I do not like being force fed Monkey Dung (metro).
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  10. #20


    Posts : 224
    .


    I think metro is the best thing that could happen to tablets and phones...

    I just wish it was thought about differently for the desktop users.
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Why Microsoft redesigned Windows
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