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Windows 8 wants Admin rights, but I AM an admin


Painkiller

New Member
Posts
5
#1
Okay, I'm very sure I set my account to be Admin, there's only one account anyway, yet W8 requests admin permission to do everything.

All because of this, I can't change the .ini of a game, I can't update Neverwinter Nights using the updater, I can't save .inis or .txts anywhere except documents...It's annoying.

I used to have W7 before, it never did this to me, but Windows 8 really deeply annoys me.

Now I'll be specific by saying that I only have "Windows 8", no Enterprise or Pro.

How can I make W8 stop nagging me everytime about admin rights? I AM an admin.
 

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System One

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#2

My Computer

System One

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    Windows 8.1.1 Pro with Media Center
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    AMD K140 Cores 2 Threads 2 Name AMD K140 Package Socket FT1 BGA Technology 40nm
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topgundcp

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San Jose - California

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2,847
#3
Even you are the Admin but to stop the nagging, you will need to set the User Access Control as shown:

1.png

Also, Make sure those .ini, .txt files are not set to read only. Just right click on the file->Properties. If set to read only then uncheck it, otherwise you will be asked to save the file somewhere else.
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

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    I7 4970K OC'ed @4.7 GHz
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Painkiller

New Member
Posts
5
#4
David Bailey, that is a good workaround, thanks, but I actually want a solution of it.

topgundcp, that's what I actually did at the start, I completely disabled UAC, but it still wants me to get adminship.

Could this actually be because I changed my account's name from Mayfair to Strogg?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 64-bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Intel i7 2600K
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    ASUS B75M-A
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    8GB RAM
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topgundcp

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San Jose - California

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2,847
#5
David Bailey, that is a good workaround, thanks, but I actually want a solution of it.
It is OK for non system files. However, I would not do this for files under C:\Windows, C:\Program Files or C:\Program Files (x86)

Could this actually be because I changed my account's name from Mayfair to Strogg?
I am not sure about this, I've never done this. Normally, Windows goes by your SID (If I remember it right, it is a 64-bit unique number for each user created) so changing the name does not change the SID.
The display name is Mayfair but I think it still point to C:\Users\Strogg.
Did it happen before you change the name ?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    8.1x64PWMC Ubuntu14.04x64 MintMate17x64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Home Brewed
    CPU
    I7 4970K OC'ed @4.7 GHz
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    MSI-Z97
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    16 GB G-Skill Trident X @2400MHZ
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Posts
5
#6
Yes, it actually did.

Also, it's not just C: where it tells me to have admin rights, but G: as well.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 64-bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Intel i7 2600K
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    ASUS B75M-A
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    8GB RAM
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    Intel HD 3000 (Integrated)
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oneeyed

New Member
Pro User
Posts
328
#7
Hmmm I use an User Account on Win 8, with UAC high and I don't have this kind of problems. I only get warnings when changing the configuration of the system. I even have NWN installed without problems, although I don't use the updater.

Your problem though might be where you installed NWN. It's best to install old games in other locations than the default (Program Files) to something else like C:\Games\NWN\. I'd suggest reinstalling it.

And taking ownership of system folders is a VERY BAD idea. Don't do it. It is there for a reason. Feel free to do it for G: though.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 (x64)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
#8
And taking ownership of system folders is a VERY BAD idea. Don't do it.
Why is that specifically ?
It's caused me no problems.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1.1 Pro with Media Center
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    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Gateway
    CPU
    AMD K140 Cores 2 Threads 2 Name AMD K140 Package Socket FT1 BGA Technology 40nm
    Motherboard
    Manufacturer Gateway Model SX2110G (P0)
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    Type DDR3 Size 8192 MBytes DRAM Frequency 532.3 MHz
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    ATI AMD Radeon HD 7310 Graphics
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    AMD High Definition Audio Device Realtek High Definition Audio USB Audio Device
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topgundcp

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#9
And taking ownership of system folders is a VERY BAD idea. Don't do it.
Why is that specifically ?
It's caused me no problems.
You really shouldn't take ownership of a file unless you really need to. There are many articles on the security downfall of such an action.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    8.1x64PWMC Ubuntu14.04x64 MintMate17x64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Home Brewed
    CPU
    I7 4970K OC'ed @4.7 GHz
    Motherboard
    MSI-Z97
    Memory
    16 GB G-Skill Trident X @2400MHZ
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    256 GB M2 sm951, (2) 500GB 850EVO, 5TB, 2 TB Seagate
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    Antec 850W
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#10
And taking ownership of system folders is a VERY BAD idea. Don't do it.
Why is that specifically ?
It's caused me no problems.
You really shouldn't take ownership of a file unless you really need to. There are many articles on the security downfall of such an action.
Point me to an article please. :)

I am the only user.
It's my computer.
I should have complete ownership to begin with.

Like I said, I "own" almost all things & have had no problems.

What bad things happen if you own everything ?

I'm not arguing here.
Just looking for enlightenment. :)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1.1 Pro with Media Center
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Gateway
    CPU
    AMD K140 Cores 2 Threads 2 Name AMD K140 Package Socket FT1 BGA Technology 40nm
    Motherboard
    Manufacturer Gateway Model SX2110G (P0)
    Memory
    Type DDR3 Size 8192 MBytes DRAM Frequency 532.3 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI AMD Radeon HD 7310 Graphics
    Sound Card
    AMD High Definition Audio Device Realtek High Definition Audio USB Audio Device
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Name 1950W on AMD Radeon HD 7310 Graphics Current Resolution 1366x768 pixels Work Resolution 1366x76
    Screen Resolution
    Current Resolution 1366x768 pixels Work Resolution 1366x768 pixels
    Hard Drives
    AMD K140
    Cores 2
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    Name AMD K140
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davehc

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Denmark (But English)

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1,150
#11
Personally, I could not see any advantage, or use, of taking ownership of, for example, system files, unless you have a deeper knowledge of exactly how such file are used in the OS
The principal thing advantage of taking ownership is that it will then allow you to modify permissions on that particular file(S), It is possible to take ownership but still not have access to it. You then need to know how to change permissions- a quite different issue.
If, for example, you have a dual boot setup, the subsequent changing of the permissions could, without care, make the file non accessible in the alternative boot.
 

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System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Other Info
    Use several different computers during a day, so specs are irrelevant.
Posts
5
#12
...Maybe I should just install Windows 7 64-bit Ultimate and remove Windows 8 64-bit?

I use my computer for gaming, if that means anything.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 64-bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
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    Intel i7 2600K
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    ASUS B75M-A
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oneeyed

New Member
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Posts
328
#13
Point me to an article please. :)I am the only user.It's my computer.I should have complete ownership to begin with.Like I said, I "own" almost all things & have had no problems.What bad things happen if you own everything ?I'm not arguing here.Just looking for enlightenment. :)
It's standard security practice, nothing more, nothing less. Anything essential to the system must be protected somehow, giving limited access to them is common sense.

It prevents exploits : if some file is read-only for users, any attempt to modify it will first need root access which is no mean feat. If your PC is connected to a network/internet, then it's a must. You might be the only user locally, but if you have access to Internet it doesn't mean much.

It also prevents "accidents"... Ever moved a folder by mistake in explorer ? If you have full ownership you won't get any warning, and if the folder was a system one you could end up ****ed up, possibly without even noticing why.

Another reason : Some programs assume that some files have the default authorizations/permissions. This includes MS update but also most security software. For example here is an excerpt from Mc Afee Virus Scan Best Pratices

Configuring on-access scanning of trusted installers
The Microsoft Windows Trusted Installer, or TrustedInstaller service, protects certain systemfiles from being replaced, changed, or deleted. This protects these files from threats that wouldinstall a rootkit or other malware on the system. These "Trusted installer" files are very difficultfor malware to change and should not require on-access scanning.
The on-access scan trusted installer setting is disabled by default with VirusScan Enterprise 8.8.This allows the installation of trusted software without on-access scanning, which improvesperformance. This is specifically true for service pack installations for Microsoft Windows.
For security reasons, you could enable this feature so all files being installed by the trustedinstaller are also being scanned, but this increase the installation time and reduces the overallsystem performance.
And here is a thread on these forums illustrating possible problems :Problems after taking ownership of Windows folder - Page 2 - Windows 7 Help Forums
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 (x64)
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    PC/Desktop

topgundcp

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San Jose - California

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2,847
#14
In addition to what DaveC stated above, sometimes you copy files from another PC and your Username is not on the list, you might have permission problem.

If you have a need to take ownership of System Files, You should use icacls (new in Windows 8) or cacls (now deprecated in Windows 8 but still available) has the option to save the permission information so you can restore back to the original owner. There are different levels of ownership on system files, some owned by "SYSTEM", some owned by "TrustedInstaller".

An example: From Admin command prompt, if you type icacls C:\Windows then you can see C:\Windows folder is owned and has Full control by "TrustedInstaller". Administrator only has Modified Access.

Another example: In this post, OP has a corrupted "Volume System Information" folder and nothing he can do to fix the problem even he is Admin: http://www.eightforums.com/performa...olume-information-folder-occupied-100-gb.html

@Painkiller: Your problem is one isolated case, and we don't know what you have done before so I suggest to reinstall Windows 8. Games run better on Windows 8, just don't move things around without knowing exactly what they do.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    8.1x64PWMC Ubuntu14.04x64 MintMate17x64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
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    I7 4970K OC'ed @4.7 GHz
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    16 GB G-Skill Trident X @2400MHZ
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lehnerus2000

Power User
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Adelaide

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1,343
#15
Backup HDD/SSD Image

If you have a need to take ownership of System Files, You should use icacls (new in Windows 8) or cacls (now deprecated in Windows 8 but still available) has the option to save the permission information so you can restore back to the original owner. There are different levels of ownership on system files, some owned by "SYSTEM", some owned by "TrustedInstaller".
Windows 7 has icacls too (mine does).

:eek: Make sure that you create a backup HDD/SSD image before experimenting. :eek:

Experiment on a folder that is not crucial to your system first (i.e. create a new folder with some sub-folders).

When I was playing around with the Windows 7 Betas, I could not get it to work "as advertised".
I created a backup of the Windows folder and sub-folders and then modified the permissions/ownership.

When I tried to restore the permissions, it skipped most of the directories (i.e. most of the directories still had the modified permissions/ownership). :confused:
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
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    Monitor Upgraded - 2012-04-20
    System Upgraded - 2011-05-21, 2010-07-14
    HDD Upgraded - 2010-08-11, 2011-08-24,
#16
Thanks for your input, all. :)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1.1 Pro with Media Center
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Gateway
    CPU
    AMD K140 Cores 2 Threads 2 Name AMD K140 Package Socket FT1 BGA Technology 40nm
    Motherboard
    Manufacturer Gateway Model SX2110G (P0)
    Memory
    Type DDR3 Size 8192 MBytes DRAM Frequency 532.3 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI AMD Radeon HD 7310 Graphics
    Sound Card
    AMD High Definition Audio Device Realtek High Definition Audio USB Audio Device
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Name 1950W on AMD Radeon HD 7310 Graphics Current Resolution 1366x768 pixels Work Resolution 1366x76
    Screen Resolution
    Current Resolution 1366x768 pixels Work Resolution 1366x768 pixels
    Hard Drives
    AMD K140
    Cores 2
    Threads 2
    Name AMD K140
    Package Socket FT1 BGA
    Technology 40nm
    Specification AMD E1-1200 APU with Radeon HD Graphics
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    Extended Family 14
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    Extended Model 2
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Posts
5
#17
Well, can I install Windows 8 64-bit Pro/Enterprise on this same hard drive without losing anything important not related to Windows?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 64-bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    Intel i7 2600K
    Motherboard
    ASUS B75M-A
    Memory
    8GB RAM
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel HD 3000 (Integrated)
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender