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Windows 8.1 freezes just before log in screen

HyunSeok

New Member
Hi, few days ago I upgraded my windows to windows 10, however after using it for few days I found out that there are some issues and windows 8.1 is more stabler on my laptop so I decided to downgrade it to windows 8.1 ( where I was in the first place). I followed the instruction that windows provided and it seemed working fine, so I waited, after few min it finished downgrading, and brought me back to windows 8.1 lock screen ( to be specific, windows 8.1 starting screen just before actual lock screen. where I press any keys or click and It disappear.) so as usual I try click but it didnt work, even key board didnt work, so I cant move to the lock screen where I put my password in, at first I thought it was a problem with my laptop but I was able to force shutdown by pressing and holding power button, I was also able to change the brightness and go in to safety mode (which means my keyboard and mouse pad is perfectly fine), I tried refreshing pc which I was able to find inside troubleshooting option on safety mode. however when I try to refresh the pc It said " additional free space is needed on the drive where windows is installed." so I cant access my pc, how can I make a free space? is there anyways to make a free space in safety mode? and is there other solution for this freezing problem? please help...

this is where my laptop is freezing (but time goes fine)

Windows81-Lock-Screen.png

and this is the computer refresh that I am trying to do

0743.WP_5F00_20131022_5F00_12_5F00_23_5F00_52_5F00_Pro.jpg
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1

IW849

Member
Member
A Linux CD (Live CD) will likely allow you access to your Windows drive, without being in Windows. Provided you know what you're doing with Linux—should be relatively simple as you won't have to install anything, simply load the CD and access the HDD, deleting only the files you don't need. You can also use a USB device with Linux on it, if you lack a CD and ability to burn an ISO. Failing that, an NTFS-supported (assuming you're not using FAT32), MS-DOS style tool via disk, USB, or CD would work, but not everyone has that. I'd pursue the Linux root. (any version of Linux should, in thoery, work, but one of the easiest to use would probably be Linux Mint with the KDE desktop environment. If you download Linux, be sure to get the right bit—32-bit or 64-bit, as appropriate for your machine.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1, x64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Custom Build
    CPU
    Intel i5 4690K @ Stock
    Motherboard
    ASUS Z97-K
    Memory
    Corsair XM3 DDR3 1600MHz @ 1333MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS 760 OC @ Stock
    Sound Card
    Onboard
    Monitor(s) Displays
    [1] ASUS, 23", AH-IPS, 16:9 [2] Samsung TV, 20", LCD TFT, 16:9
    Screen Resolution
    [1] 1920 x 1080, 60Hz [2] 1680 x 1050, 60Hz
    Hard Drives
    Internal: 500GB, 1TB, (plus SanDisk, SATAIII, 120GB SSD)
    External: 250GB USB2, 1TB External USB3
    PSU
    Corsair TX750 Enthusiast Edition
    Case
    Zalman Z11
    Cooling
    Air - 9 Total Fans
    Keyboard
    Xebec Media Line
    Mouse
    Logitech Optical
    Internet Speed
    Approx. 550KBps DL, 100KBps UL (EE)
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Kaspersky Internet Security
    Other Info
    It's "tower," not desktop!

HyunSeok

New Member
Sorry I dont understand exactly what your talking about, ufortuantaly my laptop doesnt have cd room. (Think I need cd room to fix rhe problem..if I understanded correctly) xan you explain it again please?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1

HyunSeok

New Member
A Linux CD (Live CD) will likely allow you access to your Windows drive, without being in Windows. Provided you know what you're doing with Linux—should be relatively simple as you won't have to install anything, simply load the CD and access the HDD, deleting only the files you don't need. You can also use a USB device with Linux on it, if you lack a CD and ability to burn an ISO. Failing that, an NTFS-supported (assuming you're not using FAT32), MS-DOS style tool via disk, USB, or CD would work, but not everyone has that. I'd pursue the Linux root. (any version of Linux should, in thoery, work, but one of the easiest to use would probably be Linux Mint with the KDE desktop environment. If you download Linux, be sure to get the right bit—32-bit or 64-bit, as appropriate for your machine.

Sorry I dint understand what you are talking about, ufortuantaly my laptop doesnt have cd room (think I need cd room to fix the problem if I understand it correctly) can you explain it again please?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1

IW849

Member
Member
Sorry, I'll try that again.

Linux is an operating system, but unlike Windows, you're allowed to try before you by; this is done by making an installation CD, known as "Live CD", then booting the computer up into the CD. Once that's done, you're able to use Linux to see how things work and if you like it, albeit with some limitations, given it's not even installed at that point. You then have the option to install it or to just keep messing about with it. The reason I explained this, is because people use these Live CDs for all sorts, such as troubleshooting Windows.

It sounds like you have a netbook. Since you have no CD drive, you can go the USB route, using something like this:

How to create a bootable USB stick on Windows | Ubuntu

However, I imagine all the data on that USB device will be removed in the process, so keep that in mind.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1, x64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Custom Build
    CPU
    Intel i5 4690K @ Stock
    Motherboard
    ASUS Z97-K
    Memory
    Corsair XM3 DDR3 1600MHz @ 1333MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS 760 OC @ Stock
    Sound Card
    Onboard
    Monitor(s) Displays
    [1] ASUS, 23", AH-IPS, 16:9 [2] Samsung TV, 20", LCD TFT, 16:9
    Screen Resolution
    [1] 1920 x 1080, 60Hz [2] 1680 x 1050, 60Hz
    Hard Drives
    Internal: 500GB, 1TB, (plus SanDisk, SATAIII, 120GB SSD)
    External: 250GB USB2, 1TB External USB3
    PSU
    Corsair TX750 Enthusiast Edition
    Case
    Zalman Z11
    Cooling
    Air - 9 Total Fans
    Keyboard
    Xebec Media Line
    Mouse
    Logitech Optical
    Internet Speed
    Approx. 550KBps DL, 100KBps UL (EE)
    Browser
    Firefox
    Antivirus
    Kaspersky Internet Security
    Other Info
    It's "tower," not desktop!

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