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Testing UEFI on a non UEFI system - Can be done in VMWARE


jimbo45

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Hafnarfjörður IS

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#1
Hi everyone
Some people might like to test the possibilities of UEFI systems even though their current machines aren't equipped with it.

It IS possible to do this in a Virtual machine even if the HOST system is a non UEFI machine.

Edit Manually the VM configuration for the VM you want to test this feature with.

Add the following like to the .VMX (machine configuration file)
firmware = “efi”

Note that you must do this BEFORE installing the VM and you can't change it afterwards.

Cheers
jimbo
 

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Hopachi

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#2
Thanks for the reminder Jimbo.

I had this posted a while back, works even on Player:
http://www.eightforums.com/virtualization/18753-vmware-player-uefi.html

Works like a charm.

There were no post reactions back there but I guess those who need this can easily and silently test it out. :)

You've mentioned it:
Note that you must do this BEFORE installing the VM and you can't change it afterwards.
Very important indeed because we know how easy it is to change settings on the go; unfortunately this settings aren't meant to be changed afterwards.

Cheers
Hopachi
 

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pparks1

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#3
What is it that people test with uefi? I don't notice any actual difference other than the gpt partitions. What am I missing here?
 

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Hopachi

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#4
Besides the GPT partitions I've noticed other things:

-If you boot with UEFI you have a higher resolution in BIOS and OS boot screens: 1024x768 or higher.
-In general the UEFI OS will have one or two extra small partitions compared to the MBR one...
but
-There is that ability to create 128 primary partitions on one disk and boot with them all(OS added to list in the UEFI fat32 main partition).
-UEFI claims to be more secure during boot time.
-There is more speed during OS boot.

And there may be other good stuff I'm missing as well...

A VM is a good place to encounter this first on your older machine without UEFI, if you plan on getting a new machine that will most likely have UEFI. So people can get used to the settings, partitioning and see that the performance is good.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 x64
    Computer type
    Laptop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    HP Envy DV6 7250
    CPU
    Intel i7-3630QM
    Motherboard
    HP, Intel HM77 Express Chipset
    Memory
    16GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel HD4000 + Nvidia Geforce 630M
    Sound Card
    IDT HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6' built-in + Samsung S22D300 + 17.3' LG Phillips
    Screen Resolution
    multiple resolutions
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 250GB + Hitachi HDD 750GB
    PSU
    120W adapter
    Case
    small
    Cooling
    laptop cooling pad
    Keyboard
    Backlit built-in + big one in USB
    Mouse
    SteelSeries Sensei
    Internet Speed
    slow and steady
    Browser
    Chromium, Pale Moon, Firefox Developer Edition
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    That's basically it.