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Suggested Steps To Take Installing And Setting Up Windows 8


HippsieGypsie

It's Gururrrrrr8!
Lilymoor, IL

Posts
13,547
#1
Greetings new-fangled Windows 8 users young and old!

This here is a support thread where we as a team of fellow Windows 8 veterans attempt to make installing, navigating, customizing, and personalizing Windows 8 a faster, easier, and pain free process. This thread was composed by a certain few, so if there was something missed that you feel should be in it for the greater good of the Windows 8 society, please feel free to suggest them. Our panel of judges will deliberate, debate, create and send through committees, and finally decide on those suggestions. We strive to keep the content fresh and modern as possible.

Administrator Brink’s (and others') tutorials will be referred to often. They can be found here: Windows 8 Tutorials
- Please note the alphabetical links above the category link icons or go to the index here: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/6795-windows-8-tutorial-index.html
- Welcome to the Windows 8 Forums Tutorial Section: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/2029-welcome-windows-8-forums-tutorial-section.html

Important: Please heed notices and warnings within the tutorials. If your not sure even after reading any instruction anywhere, please ask via a post. There are plenty of members that are willing to help you through any situation whether it is before, during, or after installation.

Handy Tip: Print all or a portion of this post and/or tutorials to keep with you while performing preparation, installation, and setup. Also use it to jot down personal notes while doing so.

Index:
Installation:
1. Make sure your computer is compatible to meet Windows 8 requirements.
2. Choose a proper edition of Windows 8 to fit your needs.
3. Backup! Backup! Backup!
4. Prepare your computer, download installation files, and install your Windows 8 software.


Setup/Personalization:
1. First-tasks time-savers
2. Personalization



Installation:

1.
Make sure your computer is compatible to meet Windows 8 requirements.
Go to Control Panel -> System to find the basic description of your computer. Items to look for and take note of:

1) Windows Edition you have installed currently.

2) Processor (CPU) type and speed.

3) Installed memory (RAM) size.

4) System type: 64 bit (x64) or 32 bit (x86).

5) Pen and Touch if listed.

6) You need to make sure you have ample space for installation. You need at least 32 gigabytes (60 GB to be safe) of hard drive storage available.

a) The best way to view all information is to open Start Menu -> Right click computer -> Manage -> Choose Disk Management. This will show you all drives, partitions on them, and descriptions of all.

b) Another way is to go to Start menu -> Control Panel -> System -> Device Manager. When open, push Disk Drives -> Hard drive -> Right click -> Choose properties -> Volume tab -> Click populate. It will show you the size of all the drives/partitions in megabytes (MB).

c) And yet another way is to open Windows Explorer -> Right click your present OS drive (usually C) -> Properties. This will give you the overall “pie” graph to show GBs.

7) Go to Microsoft site page Windows 8 system requirements - Microsoft Windows or consider the requirement list below taken from that web page:

• Processor: 1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster with support for PAE, NX, and SSE2. More info: What is PAE, NX, and SSE2 and why does my PC need to support them to run Windows 8? (Please refer to note below also)
• RAM: 1 gigabyte (GB) (32-bit) or 2 GB (64-bit)
• Hard disk space: 16 GB (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit)
• Graphics card: Microsoft DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM driver

Note: SecurAble is a free program you may want to download, install, and run to see if your CPU is capable of Physical Address Extension (PAE), NX, and SSE: https://www.grc.com/securable.htm

You may also want to refer to these two web pages:
Error when installing Windows 8 Release Preview: “Your - Microsoft Answers
PAE/NX/SSE2 Support Requirement Guide for Windows 8

Note: Windows 8 most often works great on the same hardware that powers Windows 7 and sometimes even older machines. If your computer does not meet the requirements, you may want to purchase a new one or upgrade the one you have with needed hardware. You may also want to visit your computer manufacture's website to see if they have provided a Window 8 compatibility upgrade guide, information for the system you intend on installing Windows 8, and/or updated drivers.

Additional requirements to use certain features:
• To use touch, you need a tablet or a monitor that supports multitouch. More info: Windows 8 multitouch hardware requirements
• To access the Windows Store and to download and run apps, you need an active Internet connection and a screen resolution of at least 1024 x 768
• To snap apps, you need a screen resolution of at least 1366 x 768
• Internet access (ISP fees might apply)
• Secure boot requires firmware that supports UEFI v2.3.1 Errata B and has the Microsoft Windows Certification Authority in the UEFI signature database
• Some games and programs might require a graphics card compatible with DirectX 10 or higher for optimal performance
• Microsoft account required for some features
• Watching DVDs requires separate playback software. More info: DVD playback options for Windows - Microsoft Windows Help
• Windows Media Center license sold separately. More info: Add features - Microsoft Windows
• BitLocker To Go requires a USB flash drive (Windows 8 Pro only)
• BitLocker requires either Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 1.2 or a USB flash drive (Windows 8 Pro only)
• Client Hyper-V requires a 64-bit system with second level address translation (SLAT) capabilities and additional 2 GB of RAM (Windows 8 Pro only)
• A TV tuner is required to play and record live TV in Windows Media Center (Windows 8 Pro Pack and Windows 8 Media Center Pack only)
• Free Internet TV content varies by geography, some content might require additional fees (Windows 8 Pro Pack and Windows 8 Media Center Pack only)

Here's a extensive question/answer guide: Windows Upgrade Offer - FAQ

Windows 8 Upgrade Assistant: Upgrade to Windows 8 - Microsoft Windows

2. Choose a proper edition of Windows 8 to fit your needs.
Choose an edition that’s right for you. For PC, Laptop, Notebook, Tablet, etc. Consider life style, business, play, etc. Check over each edition for features that are included. Which Windows is right for you? - Microsoft Windows

Note: Windows 8 brings in the new RISC based processors, or referred to as ARM processors. The identifying label on an ARM based PC will be “Windows RT”.

A) Search the Microsoft Windows site: Microsoft Windows

B) Search this Windows Eight Forums site: Advanced Search - Windows 8 Forums
If a member, ask in a thread or start one to ask for guidance on which version may be right for you. If a nonmember, you may want to consider joining and then asking.

C
) Editions presently available:

1) Windows 8 (Download/Download + Backup Disc/Ship it): Buy Windows 8 - Microsoft Store Online

2) Windows 8 Pro (Download/Download + Backup Disc/Ship it): Windows 8 Pro - Microsoft Store Online

3) Windows 8 Pro Pack:
- Adds additional features to Windows 8.
- The purchasing info and a list of added features are found on this page: Microsoft Store Online

4) Windows 8 Professional System Builder edition:
- This edition is available through select online stores. As not to prejudice stores, please do an internet search of "Windows 8 Professional System Builder".
- Here is a page from the Microsoft OEM Partner Center on licensing: OEM System Builder Licensing

5)
Windows 8 Enterprise and Enterprise Evaluation (expires after 90 days from installation date) Windows 8 Enterprise | Enterprise Software | Windows-8

6) Windows RT:
- Only available preinstalled on select tablets and PCs.

Note: Please be advised that the list may not be up to date. We will strive to keep it current.
___
3. Backup! Backup! Backup!
It is highly suggested and most important before going on is to backup your current OS and/or personal files in case installation of 8 goes wrong. The reasons are twofold. One is to be able to revert back to your current OS and the other is to keep your personal files safe. It is suggested to perform backup on exterior media such as a DVDs, thumb drives, external hard drives, and the like, not internal drives, even if it's an extra secondary non OS system drive.

Windows 7
1) Backup Complete Computer - Create an Image Backup: Backup Complete Computer - Create an Image Backup - Windows 7 Support Forums

Note: Please heed the warnings in that tutorial, especially that only the Windows 7 Professional, Ultimate, and Enterprise editions can backup to a network location. You will have to use a third party “Disk Imaging Software” or something similar to make a system image of the hard drive in other editions. Use your favorite search engine to search for “Disk Imaging Software” or similar to search for third party software. If you don't want to go to this extent, you may want to choose method 2.

Disclaimer: Using Third Party Software, including hardware drivers can cause serious problems that may prevent your computer from booting properly. No one can guarantee that any problems resulting from the use of Third Party Software can be solved. Using Third Party Software is at your own risk.

2) How to Back Up User and System Files in Windows 7: Backup User and System Files - Windows 7 Support Forums

Windows Vista
1) How to Create a Complete Computer Backup and Restore Image in Vista: Backup Complete Computer

Note: Please heed the warnings in that tutorial, especially that Windows Complete PC Backup is only available in the Vista Enterprise, Ultimate, and Business editions that can backup to a network location. You will have to use a third party “Disk Imaging Software” or something similar to make a system image of the hard drive in other editions. Use your favorite search engine to search for “Disk Imaging Software” or similar to search for third party software. If you don't want to go to this extent, you may want to choose method 2.

Disclaimer: Using Third Party Software, including hardware drivers can cause serious problems that may prevent your computer from booting properly. No one can guarantee that any problems resulting from the use of Third Party Software can be solved. Using Third Party Software is at your own risk

2) How to Backup Files with Optional Automatic Backups in Vista: Backup Files

Windows XP
We are currently working on the best way to backup and transfer personal files for XP, for Windows 8 does not read .bkf format, which is the file format XP uses in its' backup program. We suggest to perform the good old copy and paste files to external media for now. XP can be upgraded to 8 via the Upgrade Assistant and will tranfer personal files, but if anything goes wrong you may lose files. If you have an older machine there may not be any or some drivers to support Windows 8. It's suggested to run the Upgrade Assistant first to make sure: Upgrade to Windows 8 - Microsoft Windows The requirement for the Win 8 upgrade is SP3. To download: How to download Windows XP SP3 It is recommended temporarily disabling any antivirus you have installed to install SP3.
___
4. Prepare your computer, download installation files, and install your Windows 8 software.
Choose which method is best for you. Please read through the pros and cons of each method.

A) Clean Install http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/2299-clean-install-windows-8-a.html

Pros:
a) Fresh start – no holdovers from previous OS or issues due to bugs in upgrade process.
c) May be faster than upgrade.
d) Reduces system configuration time.
e) Will cost less for a period of time to upgrade to Windows 8 than to custom install.
f) ?

Cons:
a) All existing applications and customizations are lost.
b) Reformat of disk will result in loss of all personal files (back up your system before you start).
c) Old OS no longer accessible (short of complete restore).
d) Can cause issues if the previous version of Windows has incompatible programs or drivers that may not work with 8
e) ?

B) Upgrade existing OS: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/2234-upgrade-install-windows-7-vista-windows-8-a.html

Pros:
a) Keep existing applications and just replace the OS.
b) Less expensive than full version.
c) Keeps user files and settings, along with compatible programs and drivers, but installs over a previous version of Windows to 8.
d) Easy way to start on a new OS without reinstalling applications.
e) ?

Cons:
a) Not all upgrade paths are supported. Unless you have your currently installed OS installation disc and/or keys, you won’t be able to return.
b) Not a perfect process.
c) No guarantee of hardware or application compatibility.
d) May not be able to go back.
e) ?

C) Dual boot: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/2344-dual-boot-installation-windows-8-windows-7-vista.html

Pros:
a) Choice to boot up in either.
b) Keep existing OS while learning and personalizing Windows 8.
c) Install a x64 (64 bit) version along with a x86 (32 bit) existing OS.
d) Install a x86 (32 bit) version along with a x64 (64 bit) existing OS.
e) Able to use both Windows 8 and a previous version and see how the new Windows interacts directly with your PC’s hardware.
f) ?

Cons:
a) May not be enough room on your disk drive. Not so much a problem with today’s disk sizes.
b) Any applications on the existing OS must be reinstalled on Windows 8 system.
c) Files for one OS may not be accessible from the other.
d) Must reboot to choose other OS.
e) Can be tedious to manage user data files between different Windows partitions, i.e. different user library locations, etc.
f) ?

D) VMware Player: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/2899-vmware-player-install-windows-8-a.html?ltr=V

Pros:
a) Keep existing OS while learning and personalizing Windows 8.
b) Supports 32-bit or 64-bit guest OS.
c) Switch over to either within each OS.
d) Can be uninstalled easily.
e) No need to buy another computer.
f) ?

Cons:
a) Requires more powerful machine.
b) Your PC needs to have a supported CPU (Virtualization support, high clock speed, preferably dual core).
c) May be a drain on resources (memory, processor, etc.).
d) Virtual machines require additional disk space.
e) If seeing how Windows 8 interacts with you PC hardware, a virtual environment doesn’t reflect your native hardware, such as graphics card driver support.
f) ?

E) VirtualBox: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/2241-virtualbox-install-windows-8-a.html?ltr=V

Pros:
a) Keep existing OS while learning and personalizing Windows 8.
b) VirtualBox supports 64-bit guest (virtual machine) operating systems, even on 32-bit host (your computer) operating systems, provided that certain conditions are met. Please see the warnings and notes in the above tutorial.
c) Switch over to either within each OS.
d) Can be uninstalled easily.
e) No need to buy another computer.
f) ?

Cons:
a) See above. Same as for VMware Player.
b) ?

F) Windows to Go (Windows 8 Enterprise Edition only): http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/5349-windows-8-go-setup-usb-flash-drive-usb-disk.html

Microsoft’s library page on it: Windows To Go: Feature Overview
A Wikipedia article to read up on it: Windows To Go - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pros:
a) Mounts on, boots, and runs from mass storage devices such as USB flash drives and external hard disk drives.
Note: Although it can be on any qualifying USB drive (aka Stick), at the moment, Microsoft for Windows To Go has certified only two USB drives:
- Super Talent Express RC8 for Windows To Go
- Kingston DataTraveler Ultimate specialized for Windows To Go
b) “Portable” Windows goes where you go.
c) Works both on USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 connections, and both on legacy BIOS and UEFI firmware.
d) Allow enterprise administrators to provide users with an imaged version of Windows 8 that reflects the corporate desktop.
e) Able to use Windows 8 on most PCs (Windows 7 and 8 certified, and Windows Vista. Windows Xp PCs are less likely to run Windows 8 To Go drives as their firmware may not support USB booting or the PC’s hardware isn’t good enough to properly run Windows 8)
f) If in a BYOD workplace (Bring Your Own Device), a To Go drive is preferable if your workplace’s PCs have older software where you prefer newer software.
g) It wows people at your technological wizardness. :)
h) ?

Cons:
a) A USB 3.0 based flash drive of at least 32 gigabytes is required. Technically speaking a 16-gigabyte flash drive can be used as long as very few programs are installed.
b) USB boot from your PC’s BIOS or EUFI BIOS is needed.
c) Using USB 2.0 flash drives for Windows 8 To Go can be used, but performance is very slow. It’s useable up to the point where you are dealing with large files (500 MB) and saving them. It is also not preferable to use the system while installing software, drivers, or Windows Updates.
d) Windows 8 To Go is strictly limited to Windows 8 Enterprise edition. It uses volume activation (KMS servers) to keep Windows activated.
e) ?

G) VHD method: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/2393-windows-8-vhd-create-boot-dual-boot.html#post26689
NOTE: Supported in the Windows 8 Pro and Windows 8 Enterprise editions only.

Pros:
a) If you have a OEM computer where the OEM had setup 4 primary partitions on the HD or HDD where you cannot create a new partition on the HD or HDD to be able to install a second OS. Using this VHD method, they will be able to.
b) Does not require resizing existing partitions or creating new ones
c)
Leaves existing Windows installation intact
d) Existing disk drives/partitions will still be accessible (drive letters may change)
e) Easy way to see if Windows 8 will run on your system, without wiping out existing installation
f) ?

Cons:
a) Requires more advanced steps during setup
b) Potential issues with hardware drivers, etc.
c) Possibly slower performance than with standard partition
d) If VHD is too small you may run out of space
e) Must reinstall applications
f) ?

Setup/Personalization:

1. First-tasks time-savers:

A) Windows 8 is quite different than previous OSs, especially learning navigation. There's a couple of ways to get to Help files.

1) Beginning on the Start Screen -> Press [Windows Key + C] or [finger or mouse pointer in either upper/lower right corners] -> Charms bar appears -> Select Settings -> select Help.

2) Press F1 on the desktop (open with Windows Key + D or Start Screen tile).

3) There are free and pay-for apps via the Store for learning 8 -> Open the Store via the Start Screen Store tile -> [Windows key + C] or [finger or mouse pointer in either upper/lower right corners] -> Charms bar appears -> Select search -> Type "learn windows" -> Results appear just below typing box.


B) Check time zone. Sometimes versions don’t offer this option upon installation: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/4193-time-zone-change-windows-8-a.html

C) By default "Safe Mode" is not an included option within Windows 8 Boot Manager. It's suggested to add it immediately in case it is needed for diagnostics. http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/2758-safe-mode-add-windows-boot-manager-windows-8-a.html

D) Arrange Modern tiles and name groups on Start Screen. Straightway after you install, it’s recommended you title the groups of tiles so that when you install other apps or legacy programs those new tiles are added at the end of the Start Screen where they are easily accessible to work with. You can add the tiles to another group, unpin them, and/or title that group of tiles. Otherwise, this gets to be a big mess and chore: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/4870-start-screen-apps-organize-into-groups.html

E) Check Action Center notifications via the Control Panel to see if there are any issues. A very handy means of resolving problems.

F) Check Device Manager via the Control Panel to see if there are any yellow warning flags of perifierals and/or devices. Most often problems arise from wrong or impropely installed drivers. You may want check your manufacture's website to search for updated drivers and/or other software they may have. Here is a list on the MS site: Additional Windows 8 Upgrade Information

G) Turn on File Backup or make sure it is configured on so as not to lose valuable data in case of a crash. http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/8872-backup-files-windows-8-a.html

H) The start screen is NOT a replacement for the start menu. The all apps area IS the replacement for the start menu. To get to All Apps -> Mouse right click on empty space of the Start Screen or hold (with touch screen) -> All Apps button appears. Or while in Start Screen push WinKey/Z then Enter.
Please read more on this here: http://www.eightforums.com/general-discussion/9789-all-apps-new-start-menu.html

I) Although Windows 8 is mainly designed as a touch UI, shortcut keys work well to navigate around. Here is a great list and other helpful posts: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/2355-windows-8-keyboard-shortcut-keys-list.html

J) ?


2. Personalization:

A) Set up administration and user accounts: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/?filter[1]=User%20Accounts

B) Set lock screen background and color: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/2639-lock-screen-background-image-change-windows-8-a.html

C) Change Desktop background: http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/5538-desktop-background-change-windows-8-a.html

D) To access Start Screen colors/patterns, lock screen, and user account picture; either swipe in on the right side of the screen, move the mouse pointer in either top or bottom right corners, or press Start key and C at the same time. Then, tap or click on Settings charm, on the bottom you will see “Change PC Settings” It will take you to Personalize the Start Screen and various items.

E) Some apps are able to display updates on the Lock Screen. Under Personalize, scroll down a bit and select what apps you’d like to see on the Lock Screen. You can also select an app that can show more details on the Lock Screen, such as Calendar, Weather apps, or another support app.

F) By default, you will not see the items that were once on the legacy Windows Start Menu on the new Start Screen. This is partly due to Microsoft’s push to put the new apps on display. To get items such as Libraries, Computer, and/or Control Panel, you will need to pin them to Start. From the Start Screen, right click or swipe up from the bottom of a touch screen, then hit All apps. Scroll over to the right, and you a group called “Windows Accessories.” You will need to pin Computer and Control Panel. To do this, right click, and on the bottom command bar, select Pin to Start, or Pin to Taskbar. Do this for a folder, hard drive/network location, or a library.

G) On the Desktop, personalization settings are the same as with Windows 7. Right click on the Desktop, and click Personalize. You can also use the new Charms bar in the Settings charm, then selecting Personalization.

H) After lots of Desktop app installing, your All Apps screen with new program links such as help files, can make opening items from that screen less quick. To clean up items on both Start and All Apps screen, right click on a Desktop tile, and on the bottom, select Open file location. This will take you to the Desktop File Explorer where you can delete in mass these shortcuts. Keep in mind, deleting certain folder, such as Startup, will make you lose access to the Startup tab in Task Manger to enable or disable startup items.

I) Shortcuts: Windows 8 Tutorials (Top right)

J) ?
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    8.1 Pro X64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Acer T690
    CPU
    Intel Pentium D Dual Core
    Motherboard
    Acer/Intel E946GZ
    Memory
    2GB (max upgrade)
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 3000 - PCI Express x16
    Sound Card
    Integrated RealTek ALC888 high-definition audio with 7.1 channel audio support
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer AL1917W A LCD
    Screen Resolution
    1440 X 900
    Hard Drives
    350 GB Seagate Barracuda 7200.10
    Thumb drives
    PSU
    Standard 250 watt
    Case
    Desktop 7.2" (183mm) W x 17.5" (445mm) L x 14.5"
    Cooling
    Dual case fans + CPU fan
    Keyboard
    Acer Windows PS/2
    Mouse
    Wireless Microsoft Arc
    Internet Speed
    54mbp/s
    Browser
    IE11
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    Office Pro 2013 / Nokia Lumia 1520 Windows Phone 8.1DP GDR1

Coke Robot

New Member
Pro User
Gold Member
Posts
5,707
#2
Seems fairly simple yet comprehensive. ;)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    ASUS
    CPU
    AMD FX 8320
    Motherboard
    Crosshair V Formula-Z
    Memory
    16 gig DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS R9 270
    Screen Resolution
    1440x900
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Seagate Barracuda (starting to hate Seagate)
    x2 3 TB Toshibas
    Windows 8.1 is installed on a SanDisk Ultra Plus 256 GB
    PSU
    OCZ 500 watt
    Case
    A current work in progres as I'll be building the physical case myself. It shall be fantastic.
    Cooling
    Arctic Cooler with 3 heatpipes
    Keyboard
    Logitech K750 wireless solar powered keyboard
    Mouse
    Microsoft Touch Mouse
    Browser
    Internet Explorer 11
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, but I might go back on KIS 2014

TheGrantFitz

Super Member
Member
United States

Posts
650
#3
I almost think the distribution of the betas was a little "too easy"
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro, iOS 7.1, Elementary OS
    Computer type
    Tablet
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Apple
    Memory
    1 GB
    Screen Resolution
    2048x1536
    Other Info
    iPad Air

MadHorseman

New Member
Power User
#4
Don't forget the PAE/NX malarkey - PC's that run CP fine may not run RP or later versions.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    WIN7 Home Premium 64-bit
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Homebuilt
    CPU
    Intel I7 920
    Motherboard
    Asus P6T-Se
    Memory
    6Gb
    Graphics Card(s)
    Sapphire HD5770
    Sound Card
    On-board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    ASUS VW246H, Samsing Syncmaster 2233, Samsung Syncmaster T200HD
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    2 x 500Gb
    PSU
    Coolermaster Silent Pro M700
    Case
    NOX
    Mouse
    Logitech Marble
    Internet Speed
    10Mbps
    Other Info
    Dell Inspiron 1501 with Win 8 CP 32 Bit - flying along!

azasadny

Moved to ten*****s.com
VIP Member
Guru
#6
Thanks for the good info!!
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win 10 Pro 64bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Home built Intel i7-3770k-based system
    CPU
    Intel i7-3770k, Overclocked to 4.6GHz (46x100) with Corsair H110i GT cooler
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z77 OC Formula 2.30 BIOS
    Memory
    32GB DDR3 2133 Corsair Vengeance Pro
    Graphics Card(s)
    GeForce GTX 980ti SC ACS 6GB DDR5 by EVGA
    Sound Card
    Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium HD, Corsair SP2500 speakers and subwoofer
    Monitor(s) Displays
    LG 27EA33 [Monitor] (27.2"vis) HDMI
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 850 EVO 250GB (system drive)
    WD 6TB Red NAS hard drives x 2 in Storage Spaces (redundancy)
    PSU
    Corsair 750ax fully modular power supply with sleeved cables
    Case
    Corsair Air 540 with 7 x 140mm fans on front, rear and top panels
    Cooling
    Corsair H110i GT liquid cooled CPU with 4 x 140" Corsair SP "push-pull" and 3 x 140mm fans
    Keyboard
    Thermaltake Poseidon Z illuminated keyboard
    Mouse
    Corsair M65 wired
    Internet Speed
    85MBps DSL
    Browser
    Chrome and Edge
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, MalwareBytes Pro and CCleaner Pro
    Other Info
    Client of Windows Server 2012 R2 10 PC's, laptops and smartphones on the WLAN.

    1GBps Ethernet ports

HippsieGypsie

It's Gururrrrrr8!
Lilymoor, IL

Posts
13,547
#7
You're welcome, azasadny. Welcome to EightForums. Enjoy your stay. Have fun. :)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    8.1 Pro X64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Acer T690
    CPU
    Intel Pentium D Dual Core
    Motherboard
    Acer/Intel E946GZ
    Memory
    2GB (max upgrade)
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 3000 - PCI Express x16
    Sound Card
    Integrated RealTek ALC888 high-definition audio with 7.1 channel audio support
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer AL1917W A LCD
    Screen Resolution
    1440 X 900
    Hard Drives
    350 GB Seagate Barracuda 7200.10
    Thumb drives
    PSU
    Standard 250 watt
    Case
    Desktop 7.2" (183mm) W x 17.5" (445mm) L x 14.5"
    Cooling
    Dual case fans + CPU fan
    Keyboard
    Acer Windows PS/2
    Mouse
    Wireless Microsoft Arc
    Internet Speed
    54mbp/s
    Browser
    IE11
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    Office Pro 2013 / Nokia Lumia 1520 Windows Phone 8.1DP GDR1

Hugo

New Member
Posts
2
#8
Is there a way to move an entire group of apps to the Start page? When you right-click on the Start page, a little "All apps" icon appears at the bottom right of the screen. If you click on it, all the apps appear in groups. Among others, you can see Windows Accessories. Is there a way to move that group to the Start page, and then remove the apps you don't want from that group once it's on the Start page?

Thank you.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win 8

mdmd

Closed as requested
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#9
Hello Hugo.
This is a question I do not understand, but it is a preference I guess.
Why not simply pin to the start screen a link from the all apps area that is used very frequently?
(example: [from the all apps area] right click > "notepad" > bottom left of screen > pin to start)

The all apps area is where the organization exists.
Why try to make the start screen the same as the all apps area?
The all apps area (only 1 click from the desktop) is virtually the same as the start screen and everything is labeled, grouped and sorted (automatically organized).

If you want to copy a group to the start screen, simply "pin to start" all links from that group in the all apps area and then zoom the block on the start screen and give that block a title.

note.jpg

cbar.jpg

ssgroup.jpg

http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/4869-zoom-view-start-apps-screen-windows-8-a.html?ltr=Z

When at the start screen > if you have a scroll wheel > press control and roll the wheel
or > use the "semantic zoom" bottom right of start screen where there is a minus sign visible.
The start screen is an excellent place to pin links that do not exist in the all apps area...like folders, or "My Documents", "My Pictures", internet links (websites > pin to start), or others ... or whatever you like or is your preference.

It sure is a lot easier than creating "shortcuts" the "old fashioned way" :D
 
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#10
Thank you for your prompt reply mdmd.

I was going with GippsieGypsie's Setup/Personalization item B Start Screen Apps - Organize into Groups recommendation. Not trying to make the start screen the same as the All apps area.

Take for instance the Windows Accessories group containing 15 apps. If I want to place 8 or 10 of those on the Start Page, it'll be less effort (if it's possible, of course) to pin the entire group and then unpin the apps I don't want. Otherwise, I have to do the steps to pin one by one the apps I want, then on the start page put them in a group, and then name the group.

Now, I'm interested in your "The all apps area (only 1 click from the desktop)". Please elaborate on that. I can do it on no less than three clicks. Right-click on the "Start page", click on "All apps" and once more on the app I want to launch. I don't even know how to get to "All apps" from the desktop.

I'm also interested in your approach to "copy a group to the start screen", if it's different from the one explained by GippsieGypsie in the steps referenced above.

Thanks again for your contribution. I'm very new to Windows 8.
 

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mdmd

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#11
You're welcome Hugo.
As someone else said "it's a gear grinder for me!" ... a bugaboo

anyway... we don't have voice commands yet > "computer > copy group "abc" to the start screen" program complete :D

We used to have to create shortcuts and save, copy and paste them somewhere. Now, in 8, its pin and unpin. My focus is on pinning to the start screen only those needed frequently...others have their own preference.

It's all pinning to the start screen or unpinning from the start screen > same difference.
As far as clicks go, 1 click or 3, it's still easy.

If one is at the desktop screen, then go to charms, click (magnifying glass > search),
at this point one would be at the all apps area. Unfortunately or not, the autohide feature of the edge UI keeps it out there until one presses escape or clicks again. Also available from the start screen or metro IE or anywhere else > charms to search and click "apps."

There are some folks that like to have 70 or 80 tiles on the start screen which I think is a bit much. That is their preference. I try to limit the tile count to 12 or less, usually, ... doing frequent work on the desktop, one could pin or unpin things to the taskbar as well.

apps.jpg

minstart.jpg

HG's sticky thread is useful, helpful. Comprehensive. "Some of us" here, have been using 8 as their primary OS for almost a year. My preference is to not be in favor of group blocks on the start screen, because they tend to duplicate what is in the all apps area and my field of vision is less offended by a minimal number of apps and tiles on the start screen.
 
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#12
Is there a way to move an entire group of apps to the Start page? When you right-click on the Start page, a little "All apps" icon appears at the bottom right of the screen. If you click on it, all the apps appear in groups. Among others, you can see Windows Accessories. Is there a way to move that group to the Start page, and then remove the apps you don't want from that group once it's on the Start page?

Thank you.
Hi Hugo. I don't know of any way to move a group like that. I'm on my 7 side right now. I doubt if this works, but does holding Ctrl key down while selecting keep adding to the group just as in past WEs group selecting?
 

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mdmd

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#13
Hello HG. No multi selects to "pin to start" from the all apps area to the start screen. One "pin to start" at a time. No copy or paste either. How long does it take to pin 8 programs? ...
...20 seconds?
 

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#14
Hello HG. No multi selects to "pin to start" from the all apps area to the start screen. One "pin to start" at a time. No copy or paste either. How long does it take to pin 8 programs? ...
...20 seconds?
You're correct. It doesn't take too long.
 

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#15
I'd like to take time here to point out what's stated in the opening paragraphs. This is a "we" undertaking. If anyone would like to add or edit to correct information may do so by posting or PMing one of the contacts. Thanx.
 

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mdmd

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#16
Personalization (section H)
After lots of Desktop app installing, your All Apps screen with new program links such as help files, can make opening items from that screen less quick.
This makes no sense to me. How would program links such as help files make opening items from that screen less quick? The all apps area is identical in click count to the start screen. To the corner spot and click tile - To the all apps area is charms (search) press and click link. Same thing.

Personalization (section H)
To clean up items on both Start and All Apps screen, right click on a Desktop tile, and on the bottom, select Open file location. This will take you to the Desktop File Explorer where you can delete in mass these shortcuts. Keep in mind, deleting certain folders, such as Startup, will make you lose access to the Startup tab in Task Manager to enable or disable startup items.
Kind of reckless to advise deleting shortcuts en masse. When I first started using 8, I also thought the all apps area needed to be edited. But the reality is, editing the all apps area makes no sense at all. The all apps area is where the organization is maintained by the operating system and deleting folders or shortcuts made by installations is illogical. Any operations that are sent to the startup area in Task Manager can be disabled. These features might be needed at a later date and would be available to be enabled.

Setup/Personalization (section B)
Arrange Modern tiles and name groups on Start Screen. Straightway after you install, it’s recommended you title the groups of tiles so that when you install other apps or legacy programs those new tiles are added at the end of the Start Screen where they are easily accessible to work with. You can add the tiles to another group, unpin them, and/or title that group of tiles. Otherwise, this gets to be a big mess and chore
Where did this rule come from? Why would anyone want start screen(s)? Why would you want to duplicate the all apps area? The Operating System organizes the all apps. If you only need 14 tiles total (example) on the start screen for everyday use, why have 60? Intermittent use can be easily executed from all apps.

Personalization (section F)
By default, you will not see the items that were once on the legacy Windows Start Menu on the new Start Screen. This is partly due to Microsoft’s push to put the new apps on display. To get items such as Libraries, Computer, and/or Control Panel, you will need to pin them to Start.
Where did the Press Release come from that stated items such as Libraries, Computer and/or Control Panel are not on the start screen because of "Microsoft's push" to put the new apps on display? The Libraries are available from the all apps area running either File Explorer or Computer. Libraries do not need to be pinned to the start screen. The desktop tile is a logical place to begin the "traditional experience."

Personalization (section F)
You will need to pin Computer and Control Panel.
Why do you need to pin Computer and Control Panel ? They are readily accessible from many points and there is no need for them to be on the start screen. No need unless that is your preference.

If someone using a "computer" (not a toaster) does not understand "F1 - help" or in Windows 8 moving the mouse to the edge to access charms (edge UI) - search - start - settings - power etc... then I question their skill set and they indeed may need help.
 
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Coke Robot

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#17
Personalization (section H)
After lots of Desktop app installing, your All Apps screen with new program links such as help files, can make opening items from that screen less quick.
This makes no sense to me. How would program links such as help files make opening items from that screen less quick? The all apps area is identical in click count to the start screen. To the corner spot and click tile - To the all apps area is charms (search) press and click link. Same thing.

Personalization (section H)
To clean up items on both Start and All Apps screen, right click on a Desktop tile, and on the bottom, select Open file location. This will take you to the Desktop File Explorer where you can delete in mass these shortcuts. Keep in mind, deleting certain folders, such as Startup, will make you lose access to the Startup tab in Task Manager to enable or disable startup items.
Kind of reckless to advise deleting shortcuts en masse. When I first started using 8, I also thought the all apps area needed to be edited. But the reality is, editing the all apps area makes no sense at all. The all apps area is where the organization is maintained by the operating system and deleting folders or shortcuts made by installations is illogical. Any operations that are sent to the startup area in Task Manager can be disabled. These features might be needed at a later date and would be available to be enabled.



Where did this rule come from? Why would anyone want start screen(s)? Why would you want to duplicate the all apps area? The Operating System organizes the all apps. If you only need 14 tiles total (example) on the start screen for everyday use, why have 60? Intermittent use can be easily executed from all apps.

Personalization (section F)
By default, you will not see the items that were once on the legacy Windows Start Menu on the new Start Screen. This is partly due to Microsoft’s push to put the new apps on display. To get items such as Libraries, Computer, and/or Control Panel, you will need to pin them to Start.
Where did the Press Release come from that stated items such as Libraries, Computer and/or Control Panel are not on the start screen because of "Microsoft's push" to put the new apps on display? The Libraries are available from the all apps area running either File Explorer or Computer. Libraries do not need to be pinned to the start screen. The desktop tile is a logical place to begin the "traditional experience."

Personalization (section F)
You will need to pin Computer and Control Panel.
Why do you need to pin Computer and Control Panel ? They are readily accessible from many points and there is no need for them to be on the start screen. No need unless that is your preference.

If someone using a "computer" (not a toaster) does not understand "F1 - help" or in Windows 8 moving the mouse to the edge to access charms (edge UI) - search - start - settings - power etc... then I question their skill set and they indeed may need help.
Hello there mdmd! The suggestions here are based on different usage scenarios, four quotes you point out are my suggestions, the four after the first quote.

You can say it is reckless to delete en masse many shortcut links, but when you have about...
Screenshot (55).png
Screenshot (56).png
Screenshot (57).png
...a few screens worth of All Apps to the point where Windows is whipping out the Windows Phone All Apps letter jumplist on you, it gets kind of important to have a properly trimmed All Apps screen; especially if you access it more than a few times. The shortcuts that I delete are the HTML help files you'll never click on, uninstaller files as if the program tile is on Start, one can right click and hit Uninstall and it takes you to Programs and Features to uninstall it. It's the same concept with the start menu, I used to clean up the All Programs list by getting rid of superfluous folders and shortcuts, and moving the relevant ones up in the All Programs list, which in 8, the folders in the start menu of All Programs are basically All Apps, and the relevant links in All Programs above the folders are the Start Screen in 8. It's easier to get to a program that's not muddled by several superfluous links and help files that you don't need. If I need a program that I don't have on Start, I'd rather get to it faster since I can glance at the tile versus scanning though a small list of links I don't ever need. From what I've seen, if you get rid of the Startup folder from File Explorer and go to the Startup tab in Task Manager, you lose access to disable the startup items as the directory is messed up. Reinstating that folder puts those startup items back into view in Task Manager. I did that when I installed the RTM, and I had about a dozen startup entries that I didn't know were starting up. Wisdom says not to delete folders UNLESS YOU ARE CERTAIN it won't affect anything. If not, don't delete the folder.

The recommendation to arrange your tiles into groups or whatever after program installs comes from usage experience as well. I too have used Windows 8 for more than a year, and this comes from that. You don't necessarily need to do such after EVERY program install, but you should do it so you don't forget. so you're not faced with a littering of tiles that make you go, "What the f words?!" I have multiple Start Screens personally as I would rather have quick access to the things I need often (which I do need often) at a simple click or a slight scroll over. This piece of wisdom we impart onto the reader as Windows 8 is new, Start Screen is new and it won't come to be fairly obvious to most people as it does with us. Pretty much every install of Windows 7 I've done, the start menu was always cleaned and trimmed up for faster access to program shortcuts. Every performance configuration I've done on a PC after it has been used often will have a crap ton of crap in the start menu to the point where the UI element isn't used anymore, typing in a search query is most likely used versus manual searching. The point of the Start Screen (one of many) is to eliminate that scenario so instead of typing in a search, the user can just quickly scope out a tile, and click it. Now, if the user is faced with a huge block of tiles, with mixed programs and help files here and there, the same scenario from 7 has the potential of coming back. But thankfully, the Start Screen has a few things the user can do to organize things to their liking. I personally group tiles together based on usage and category. A couple of friends of mine that have been using Windows 8 for more than a year have different things they do to it. One just pins very few items to it, like Desktop, four different media playing programs, Office 2013 apps they need, and a few metro apps. The other one groups the metro apps together and arranges them along with some other Desktop programs they use. Both don't have libraries or Computer or Control Panel pinned, which annoys me when I use their puter. They both use Explorer jumplist to navigate around. Control Panel isn't used often enough. But again, to the reader reading the suggested tips of configuring as they are arriving to Windows 8 and seeing this totally different UI, they will need items that were once on the start menu onto the Start Screen to bridge the change.

The press hasn't said anything about Microsoft's push for metro apps over Desktop items on the Start Screen. This is based on my speculation. By default, after installing Windows 8, the Start Screen is a mosaic of Microsoft's apps: Calendar, Mail, People, Bing, Travel, ect. There isn't one Desktop item other than the Desktop tile on the Start Screen. Considering Microsoft is pushing for app development for Windows 8 (i.e. WinRT apps) and the idea that soon, the Desktop won't be hugely needed in the future as Microsoft will most likely develop the rest of the needed Desktop items like File Explorer, Control Panel and such into the WinRT base. That is most likely their coding future as they move past Win32, and move into WinRT and MinWin technology. Yes, the Desktop tile can be used to go into the Desktop and navigate around, but again, Windows 8 can easily be configured into a Desktop oriented OS. Start Screen can definitely take place of the start menu, which we've been using for 17 or so years. I personally don't use jumplists a bunch, but I know people that do. It's up to the user, as the suggested tips give ideas to what the user can do.

Like you've said, it's up to user preference. I use the Start Screen differently than you as do others. This here thread gives suggested tips to make installing Windows 8 and configuring/personalizing the Start Screen more or less difficult to the new Windows 8 user that is moving up to it from 7, or vista, or xp, or GOD forbid 2000. You and I have been using Windows 8 since the early DP days, so we literally do know a huge chunk, if not all, of the ins and outs of Windows 8 and the Start Screen compared to some "testers", let alone the person that just installed it probably this week or later this month or later this year or later next year.
 

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HippsieGypsie

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#18
Originally Posted by HippsieGypsie

Setup/Personalization (section B)
Arrange Modern tiles and name groups on Start Screen. Straightway after you install, it’s recommended you title the groups of tiles so that when you install other apps or legacy programs those new tiles are added at the end of the Start Screen where they are easily accessible to work with. You can add the tiles to another group, unpin them, and/or title that group of tiles. Otherwise, this gets to be a big mess and chore
Originally Posted by mdmd
Where did this rule come from? Why would anyone want start screen(s)? Why would you want to duplicate the all apps area? The Operating System organizes the all apps. If you only need 14 tiles total (example) on the start screen for everyday use, why have 60? Intermittent use can be easily executed from all apps.
Hi mdmd. I'm glad to see you post your concerns.

This suggestion is mine. I found that unless I organized my Start Screen right after I installed 8, it got quite lengthy after installing more apps or legacy programs. It was quite unorganized and was a big chore for me to organize in groups, name them (if desired), unpin some tiles, move groups, etc. If performed straightway, any new tiles are added to the end of the screen where they are easily identified and easier to work with so far as moving one or all them to a group, unpinning them, grouping them, naming that group, etc.

I hope we have satisfied you questions and concerns. We will discuss to possibly edit these to explain them more thoroughly. If you or any member wishes to rewrite for to edit or desire to add your suggestion, please feel free to do so. We strive to make this a "We" project.

Again, thanks for posting.
 

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mdmd

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#19
Hello CR and HG.

You can say it is reckless to delete en masse many shortcut links, but when you have about...
That's not many! OMG, your all apps is very clean! It seems to me a waste of time to start doing the same irritating house work in 8 as in all previous versions of Windows when it (from my point of view) is unnecessary. It may be an old habit. The "delete en masse" is the curious action that perhaps may not be a good idea. Certainly not necessary. All of this is preference. You are right and anyone is right to do as they see fit to do. It's ok with me.

it gets kind of important to have a properly trimmed All Apps screen; especially if you access it more than a few times.
I wouldn't use the all apps as a replacement for the start screen.

I am happy to make no effort to edit the all apps because that is the same kind of work as editing the corner mess orb. > That is why I like semantic zoom. You could have thousands of links on 20 screens in all apps and they will have quick access to by OS organization. With everything on 1 screen, no nesting, I am a happy camper. It seems effortless to pick and click even with a full screen of links in all apps.

apps.jpg

The recommendation to arrange your tiles into groups or whatever after program installs comes from usage experience as well.
Groups and naming groups are a great idea, and if one needs start screen(s), that's ok with me. It's all about preference. The tendency to duplicate the all apps and unneeded start screen tile placement is what grinds my chalkboard.

The press hasn't said anything about Microsoft's push for metro apps over Desktop items on the Start Screen.
Without getting a little conspiratorial, perhaps the design engineers considered the placement of the desktop features in all apps, winx, and edge UI, a good place to start. Any of which can be pinned or unpinned at anytime. Preference.

Yes, the "suggested steps to take"... It's a good place to start.
 

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System One

  • OS
    Server 2012 / 8.0
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel i7 QuadCore 3770k
    Motherboard
    Asrock Extreme 4
    Memory
    16GB Crucial Ballistix
    Graphics Card(s)
    intel embedded gpu
    Sound Card
    Sound Blaster Z
    Monitor(s) Displays
    AOC / Westinghouse
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Plextor pcie msata
    PSU
    Rosewill Silent Night 500W Fanless / PicoPSU
    Case
    open bench - no case enclosure
    Cooling
    Silverstone HEO2 Passive Silent
    Keyboard
    logitech washable K310
    Mouse
    logitech wired
    Browser
    ie / maxthon
    Other Info
    Totally silent. No fans at all.

mdmd

Closed as requested
Posts
1,319
#20
Best of Luck to all using Windows Whatever.
Live long and prosper.
Resistance is futile.
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Server 2012 / 8.0
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Home Built
    CPU
    Intel i7 QuadCore 3770k
    Motherboard
    Asrock Extreme 4
    Memory
    16GB Crucial Ballistix
    Graphics Card(s)
    intel embedded gpu
    Sound Card
    Sound Blaster Z
    Monitor(s) Displays
    AOC / Westinghouse
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Plextor pcie msata
    PSU
    Rosewill Silent Night 500W Fanless / PicoPSU
    Case
    open bench - no case enclosure
    Cooling
    Silverstone HEO2 Passive Silent
    Keyboard
    logitech washable K310
    Mouse
    logitech wired
    Browser
    ie / maxthon
    Other Info
    Totally silent. No fans at all.