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Security policy

Skofab

New Member
Unfortunately I have messed up my lenovo g510 win 8.1 laptop.
Somehow I have altered something, and now I get a message window to say efi dvd is blocked by security policy.

How can I overcome this problem. All help and suggestions welcome
Thanks
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    windows 8.1

TechnoMage

Active Member
Power User
I'm really surprised that no-one had replied to your post in almost a month. Sorry about that! And, Welcome to the 8.1 forum.

This may not help, but it's definitely a suggestion. Eh mate?

I'm a real NO-Nonsense PC operator and 40 yr + computer builder/Tech. So one of the first things I do after setting up a new OS, is back it up, so if I mess it up later, I can just do a C: drive restore and be back where I was, before I, or something, messed it up.
So I'm assuming you didn't do that. Eh?

Failing to have a clean backup, I'd just save all my data files off of that drive and then RE-Install Windows. I keep every version of windows, on Flash Drives, for a quick install.
That's never what someone with a problem wants to hear, but hey, it fixes ALL the problems.

Please let me know how you're doing.
Cheers Mate!
TM :cool:
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win-8.1/Pro/64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Home Made
    CPU
    AMD 8 Core
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte, Ultra Durable, GA-970A-DSP3
    Memory
    Crucial, 8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    AMD Radeon HD 5450 (2 GB)
    Sound Card
    On Board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    24" LG
    Hard Drives
    Sandisk, SSD 120GB, 8TB Seagate backup drive
    PSU
    Antec Earthwatts, 650
    Case
    Pac-Man Case
    Keyboard
    HP Professional
    Mouse
    GearHead Wireless
    Internet Speed
    5 Meg
    Browser
    Firefox
    Other Info
    Using Classic Shell on Win-8.1 /pro/64

starvinmarvin

New Member
What about resetting the CMOS?
Unplug power cord.
Remove battery. Hold down power on/off button for 10 seconds.
Remove bottom panel screws.
Locate and remove CMOS battery.
Wait a few seconds then reinsert the CMOS battery.
Reinsert main battery. Turn the computer ON and see if that cures the issue.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    custom
    CPU
    Intel Core i5-4590 @ 3.3GHz
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z97 Extreme4
    Memory
    4 x 4GB G.Skill DDR4-2400
    Graphics Card(s)
    Gigabyte GTX-1050Ti

TechnoMage

Active Member
Power User
Ahem!
A few seconds will NOT reset the CMOS on 99% of PC's. Sorry Charley!
I've adopted 30 minutes as the appropriate time delay for resetting the CMOS, after ALL power has been removed from the PC, (and also remove the Main Battery from laptops)
And, if the CMOS battery that has been removed, does not check out to 3.0 volts DC, on a digital volt meter, trash it and put in a new one.
Anything less than 3.0 volts, means the battery is going down and definitely should be replaced.

:cool:
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win-8.1/Pro/64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Home Made
    CPU
    AMD 8 Core
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte, Ultra Durable, GA-970A-DSP3
    Memory
    Crucial, 8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    AMD Radeon HD 5450 (2 GB)
    Sound Card
    On Board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    24" LG
    Hard Drives
    Sandisk, SSD 120GB, 8TB Seagate backup drive
    PSU
    Antec Earthwatts, 650
    Case
    Pac-Man Case
    Keyboard
    HP Professional
    Mouse
    GearHead Wireless
    Internet Speed
    5 Meg
    Browser
    Firefox
    Other Info
    Using Classic Shell on Win-8.1 /pro/64

starvinmarvin

New Member
Ahem!
A few seconds will NOT reset the CMOS on 99% of PC's. Sorry Charley!
I've adopted 30 minutes as the appropriate time delay for resetting the CMOS, after ALL power has been removed from the PC, (and also remove the Main Battery from laptops)
And, if the CMOS battery that has been removed, does not check out to 3.0 volts DC, on a digital volt meter, trash it and put in a new one.
Anything less than 3.0 volts, means the battery is going down and definitely should be replaced.

:cool:
Maybe we can compromise on the time needed to reset. According to Intel it should be:

 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    custom
    CPU
    Intel Core i5-4590 @ 3.3GHz
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z97 Extreme4
    Memory
    4 x 4GB G.Skill DDR4-2400
    Graphics Card(s)
    Gigabyte GTX-1050Ti

TechnoMage

Active Member
Power User
Oh for good sakes! Can't you find something to do for 30 minutes? Clean out the cooling fan, or something. Or do you just want to argue?
I've been at this stuff for over 40 years, on hundreds of PC's, and YES, I've tried lesser times and found that the CMOS memory did not fully reset to ZERO.
And nobody wants a partially RESET CMOS memory.
:cool:
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win-8.1/Pro/64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Home Made
    CPU
    AMD 8 Core
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte, Ultra Durable, GA-970A-DSP3
    Memory
    Crucial, 8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    AMD Radeon HD 5450 (2 GB)
    Sound Card
    On Board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    24" LG
    Hard Drives
    Sandisk, SSD 120GB, 8TB Seagate backup drive
    PSU
    Antec Earthwatts, 650
    Case
    Pac-Man Case
    Keyboard
    HP Professional
    Mouse
    GearHead Wireless
    Internet Speed
    5 Meg
    Browser
    Firefox
    Other Info
    Using Classic Shell on Win-8.1 /pro/64

starvinmarvin

New Member
I've only been at this computer thing for about 38 years; thus, I must bow to your vastly superior experience. By the way, thanks for reminding me to clean the cooling fan ....
Not the first one I worked on, but the first one I owned:
Panasonic_CF_2700_MSX_(UK).jpg
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    custom
    CPU
    Intel Core i5-4590 @ 3.3GHz
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z97 Extreme4
    Memory
    4 x 4GB G.Skill DDR4-2400
    Graphics Card(s)
    Gigabyte GTX-1050Ti

TechnoMage

Active Member
Power User
That keyboard looks awfully familiar. But my work with computers goes all the way back to 1964. There were NO PC's, and a Computer filled a house.
All too often, a repair involved the littlest things. One tiny little diode could take down a multi-million dollar system.
And a dirty stick of RAM in a PC, can take that system down too. I've saved a ton of ram, by just washing it. And a few video cards too.
Full replacement is way down, on my list of things to do, to fix a computer.
And I use a needle point oiler, to re-lube cooling fans, to get several more years use out of them. I can't remember, the last time I actually replace a fan.

Marvin, you don't say, where you are or what kind of computer you have. You might want to add that to your Profile.

Cheers Mate!
:cool:
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win-8.1/Pro/64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Home Made
    CPU
    AMD 8 Core
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte, Ultra Durable, GA-970A-DSP3
    Memory
    Crucial, 8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    AMD Radeon HD 5450 (2 GB)
    Sound Card
    On Board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    24" LG
    Hard Drives
    Sandisk, SSD 120GB, 8TB Seagate backup drive
    PSU
    Antec Earthwatts, 650
    Case
    Pac-Man Case
    Keyboard
    HP Professional
    Mouse
    GearHead Wireless
    Internet Speed
    5 Meg
    Browser
    Firefox
    Other Info
    Using Classic Shell on Win-8.1 /pro/64

Barman58

Super Moderator
Super Moderators
A lot of modern motherboards now have a CLRTC Pin (from Clear Real Time Clock) which you just short out for a few seconds to save thirty minutes - Time is precious these days, unless you're a millennial 🙆‍♂️
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 Pro x64 x2 Windows 10 Enterprise x64, Ubuntu
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computing
    CPU
    AMD FX8350 8 Core @4GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus M5A78L-M USB3
    Memory
    32GB [4x8GB] DDR3 1600 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus nVidia GTX750TI-OC-2GD5 (2GB DDR5)
    Sound Card
    ASUS Xoner DG + SPDIF to 5.1 System + HDMI
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer G276HL 27", (DVi) + Samsung 39" HDTV (HDMI)
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080 @60Hz + 1920 x 1080 @60Hz
    Hard Drives
    Internal
    Crucial 256GB SSD,
    WDC WD30EZRX-00D8PB0 3TB,
    Toshiba HDWD130 3TB
    Seagate ST2000DM001-1CH1 2TB,

    External (USB3)
    Seagate Backup+ Hub BK SCSI Disk 8TB
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)

    NAS
    Seagate ST4000DM000
    PSU
    Aerocool Templarius Imperator 750W 80+ Silver
    Case
    AeroCool X-Warrior Devil Red Tower
    Cooling
    Stock CPU, Rear 120mm, Front 2x120mm, Side 2x120mm
    Keyboard
    Logitech Wireless K710 & K270
    Mouse
    Logitech Wireless M710 M185 & M570 Trackball
    Internet Speed
    37Mb/s Down - 9.5Mb/s Up
    Browser
    Chrome
    Antivirus
    BitDefender Total Security 2017
    Other Info
    Also run...

    Desktop - 6Core 8GB - Windows 10 Enterprise x64,
    Laptop - Quad 8GB - Windows 10 Pro x64
    Netbook - Ubuntu
    2 x Nexus 7 Android tablets
    Samsung 10.2" tablet
    Sony Z3 Android Smartphone
    HTC One Android Smartphone

starvinmarvin

New Member
That keyboard looks awfully familiar. But my work with computers goes all the way back to 1964. There were NO PC's, and a Computer filled a house.
All too often, a repair involved the littlest things. One tiny little diode could take down a multi-million dollar system.
And a dirty stick of RAM in a PC, can take that system down too. I've saved a ton of ram, by just washing it. And a few video cards too.
Full replacement is way down, on my list of things to do, to fix a computer.
And I use a needle point oiler, to re-lube cooling fans, to get several more years use out of them. I can't remember, the last time I actually replace a fan.

Marvin, you don't say, where you are or what kind of computer you have. You might want to add that to your Profile.

Cheers Mate!
:cool:
I cleaned a very dirty laptop in the dishwasher once. Strangely, it refused to boot up afterwards. Subsequently, the owner decided to take my original advice and buy a new one.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    custom
    CPU
    Intel Core i5-4590 @ 3.3GHz
    Motherboard
    ASRock Z97 Extreme4
    Memory
    4 x 4GB G.Skill DDR4-2400
    Graphics Card(s)
    Gigabyte GTX-1050Ti

TechnoMage

Active Member
Power User
It's not the washing that hurts them, it's the water you leave behind after the wash. I regularly wash ram and even video cards, but I rinse them in alcohol to displace the water and then dry them thoroughly before Powering them up. Washing is actually the last step in PC board manufacture. I used to make PC boards, professionally.
I can actually think of a few parts of a laptop that should NOT go through a Dish Washer. (the screen and keyboard, come to mind)

Cheers mate,
TM :cool:
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win-8.1/Pro/64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Home Made
    CPU
    AMD 8 Core
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte, Ultra Durable, GA-970A-DSP3
    Memory
    Crucial, 8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    AMD Radeon HD 5450 (2 GB)
    Sound Card
    On Board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    24" LG
    Hard Drives
    Sandisk, SSD 120GB, 8TB Seagate backup drive
    PSU
    Antec Earthwatts, 650
    Case
    Pac-Man Case
    Keyboard
    HP Professional
    Mouse
    GearHead Wireless
    Internet Speed
    5 Meg
    Browser
    Firefox
    Other Info
    Using Classic Shell on Win-8.1 /pro/64
Ahem!
A few seconds will NOT reset the CMOS on 99% of PC's. Sorry Charley!
I've adopted 30 minutes as the appropriate time delay for resetting the CMOS, after ALL power has been removed from the PC, (and also remove the Main Battery from laptops)
And, if the CMOS battery that has been removed, does not check out to 3.0 volts DC, on a digital volt meter, trash it and put in a new one.
Anything less than 3.0 volts, means the battery is going down and definitely should be replaced.

:cool:


This is so true. Seems only people who've been building and working with PCs for decades know this for a fact and aren't opposed to stating it. Half an hour is nothing in this day and age where most folks own two or three PCs, laptops or whatnot. PC should be completely shut off, power cable pulled if possible, then hit power switch to drain any residual power from the caps. Pull the battery and just for kicks you could jumper it to remove any teensy weensy traces of charges left in components. Be sure to reset those pins just as you found them 20 to 30 min later and make sure you have 3.0 volts in that battery before you put it back or replace it. Power cord back to PSU and turn power supply back on before engaging power switch on case. 20 to 30 minutes is more than ample time make good use of 1) cleaning any dust out of the case with a rubber tip vacuum nozzle, 2) Reseating RAM, 3) Checking all cards and additional hardware, 4) tightening up, trimming, or replacing/rerunning cables for a neater, more practical look. Before you know it you'll be ready to reset your system. OR you can just hop on your spare laptop and do emails for 20 minutes or so. Yup. electricity can sit in a disconnected system board for half an hour quite easily depending on the unit. I find draining the caps usually fixes the issue quickly but waiting half an hour, especially in this day and age, is no big deal.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1, Windows 7 Ultimate, Windows 10, Linux Mint and more
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS
    CPU
    AMD 3800X, Intel 6900K
    Motherboard
    X99 E-WS USB 3.1, CROSSHAIR HERO VIII
    Memory
    128 GB CORSAIR DOMINATOR, 32 GB TEAM GROUP T FORCE
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA 1070, SAPPHIRE RX 590 NITRO+
    Sound Card
    ONBOARD
    Monitor(s) Displays
    SAMSUNG 32"
    Screen Resolution
    4K
    Hard Drives
    :::GRINS::: SERIOUSLY?
    PSU
    CORSAIR 1000 W PLATINUM
    Case
    THERMAL TAKE / AZZA
    Cooling
    NOCTUA / CM
    Keyboard
    LOGITECH PRODIGY
    Mouse
    LOGITECH
    Internet Speed
    1 GBs
    Browser
    FIREFOX
    Antivirus
    KASPERSKY
    Other Info
    PC builder. Own a dozen PCs / built hundreds. All of us have a lot to learn. Some of us stand to learn more than others and those who think they know the most generally know the least. I'm here to learn and pass on what little I know.

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