What's new

Let's have a massive discussion about Windows 8

Coke Robot

New Member
Pro User
Gold Member
I want to rehash something that is going to be rehashed as the Release Preview of Windows 8 comes out probably tomorrow: the Start Menu.

Ok, from a good chunk of people here and some critics, the lack of a start menu is a big deal and to some, believe it's a catastrophe. I personally would like to know why. Maybe it's that I've been rocking Windows 8 since the Developer Preview last fall and have gotten acquainted very well it doesn't bother me. Honestly, I think to desktop power users, it's a big deal because that's what has been used for a decade and some. But really, think about the common consumer of a Windows device. Many people I've come across don't really care for the start menu. A few people have told me that they honestly don't ever use it since all their main items are pinned to the Taskbar (that sucked to find out because I organized the crap out of their start menu). A few have told me that they think Windows vista, even 7, just feels old. And the large rest I've seen use Windows, have installed Windows on their PCs; I feel like I can gather that the lack of a start menu won't be a huge loss to them. As long as something is accessible, it's fine. And yes, the Start Screen is accessible, you just configure it to do so.

Then there's the Desktop UI issue. Some say it's an abortion of the UI, and without the Start Screen Windows 8 is just a faster 7 with a Ribbon UI. This may be true, but what did people say about Windows 7 when it came out, or vista for that matter? People said that 7 was like vista, but it worked. People said vista was just a warmed over version of xp with performance issues. To wrap this thought up, the Desktop is still there and works as it should with a new interface to navigate around files and programs.

And then there's the metro concept people don't like or understand. The concept of metro design is minimalism, it's about content and not UI. Sure, some think it doesn't look nice, but that's because in the year of 2006,7ish when vista came out, Microsoft took a different road with the UI and made it the centerpiece when theoretically it wasn't supposed to be. Shucks! If you look at the Windows Longhorn concept from 2002, it looks more like the new Desktop UI of Windows 8! A transparent Taskbar with solid windows and a true chromeless approach. This was 2002 design here. Things would had been much different if that was the road we took if things panned out right. Metro design takes a bit to get used to because we're so used to UI fluff, it's ridiculous. We have gotten to the point where smartphones have more visual fluff than our desktop operating systems! Really?!

And then there is the touch aspect of Windows 8 people don't care to recognize. Again, touch is the future, just like the mouse was the future years ago. Microsoft pioneered in the use of the mouse, and the rest followed into history. Now, they are going to pioneer in touch and the New User Interface of the Kinect. And as history has shown, the rest will follow because unlike apple, Microsoft has more clout about changing tech standards. apple may have wanted Flash to die and use HTML5, but the HTML5 talk didn't seem to happen until IE9 came into being, maybe google chrome had some impact as well.

All in all, Windows 8 has changed a lot about how we use a User Interface, and will soon change how we interact with a PC.

Now, let's have a huge discussion!
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS
    CPU
    AMD FX 8320
    Motherboard
    Crosshair V Formula-Z
    Memory
    16 gig DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS R9 270
    Screen Resolution
    1440x900
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Seagate Barracuda (starting to hate Seagate)
    x2 3 TB Toshibas
    Windows 8.1 is installed on a SanDisk Ultra Plus 256 GB
    PSU
    OCZ 500 watt
    Case
    A current work in progres as I'll be building the physical case myself. It shall be fantastic.
    Cooling
    Arctic Cooler with 3 heatpipes
    Keyboard
    Logitech K750 wireless solar powered keyboard
    Mouse
    Microsoft Touch Mouse
    Browser
    Internet Explorer 11
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, but I might go back on KIS 2014

tseven

New Member
Power User
I have yet to try the new release preview as I just got home and will be downloading it. On the release preview I will comment on later. But to address this discussion and in particular your questions I will say I speak for myself only and I do not represent anyone. I don't hate the fact that the start menu is gone there just is no suitable replacement and while I get the metro start is supposed to be the "replacement" I do not find it a good idea to have to go into metro to do the same things that should be found in the desktop. I do use it but I will not say it represents ALL my functions on a desktop. I use it mainly to close the computer where the charm bar is in the way while working on something the start menu only pops up when I actually want it to. I use it to search and it's much easier because after I search I'm already in the desktop unlike when I search in metro I have to go there only to go back into the desktop for whatever it is that I'm searching that is. Also for me right clicking on a corner that has the screenshot and "apps open listing" appear after I hover is quit annoying and much less efficient. Using the start menu I can get to things much faster and I don't need the extra right click. Also programs that I might not have pinned that I use semi-frequently I have access to right away even if I don't go into the programs panel. The process is the same as going into the metro start and opening a program in the list however I wouldn't have to go through the list since it mixes every program I have installed and using the start menu would allow me to stay in the desktop environment as so far there is nothing beside for entertainment that I would need to use the metro for. Yes you can configure metro start to go to your control panel and such but that's the opposite of what you would want. Some say that's called learning your system and I call it working around it. If they wanted to make it easier they would have made it something that is already configured. I'm not saying you can't figure it out but I'm just saying you shouldn't have to. If you had to do more just to get the same end result it doesn't make sense for the start screen to be the answer to the lack of a start button. Also my biggest issue is that I just don't want to go into the metro at all if my work will be focused in the desktop. So in a short note I'm not entirely upset at the removal of the start menu but just that if they were going to remove it I would have expected. something better as a solution and that is not in a different environment which is what I consider the metro start(mobile environment)

Regarding the desktop UI I don't mind them keeping it relatively the same I as long as it works and if they need to add stuff it should work better. Windows 7 was indeed similar to vista but it also had much needed improvements that SHOULD have been on vista. The problem they need to tackle here is the same thing added useful features. Ribbon is a cluttered UI it in fact may add benefits I don't know of any since bringing forth the features will not give any user the sense of actually knowing what the use of it is. Also it goes against their metro philosophy of minimalism. It is clashing with metro if anything. There are so many people that have used photoshop that can not grasp the tools even though they are right in front of them. The desktop could use adjustments to make it visually more appealing and if they are going to go with the whole metro theme they should still retain depth because with all the windows and such inside the desktop complete flatness will never work, it will just make things confusing. Basically the desktop is not bad but they could add more useful features such as the LONG overdue pin to taskbar feature in windows 7 that would help the user more or fix the desktop UI they can tone down the aero but if they are going to replace it they need a much more convincing UI and they have yet to achieve it.

Metro is nice in idea but their execution has been lacking so far. I don't hate their idea. In fact I love the idea of being minimal because sometimes minimalism is good but it is all in the execution. Vista should have never focused on just the UI but the UI wasn't even that great plus there wasn't enough good features to warrant all the focus on the looks because in all the time it took between XP and Vista it was a half-baked effort. Not all the UI that we have now are just visual fluff there is a reason to the need to have some depth because it makes things legible and distinguishable especially in an environment where things are in motion. The problem with microsoft's metro execution is they failed on delivering their own important points of their design philosophy(which is similar to design philosophy in general) their typography is questionable and in some instances illegible. If the background is too busy their text is hard to read. Legibility and typography are important. You cannot see much difference between two tiles and their theory that the tiles are better than icons is odd because tiles are basically oversized icons. While in some instances the content being the important factor is good such as media consumption sending an email you want to be sure that you know how to use the buttons(the user-interface) and some buttons give no visual cues. While the interface and visual but not seem important but they are to effectively communicate a product. Metro in windows 8 is minimal but not in a way that works in the computing world of desktop or the content that it displays. If anything the elements clash with the content. There are many ways to be minimal but still keep some effects for when it's needed. The flat in metro doesn't work in all situations especially if there are things in motion or when the stuff behind or around are busy looking. Some things just look like there wasn't even much thought put into it although I'm sure there were such as the buttons that are basically words with borders around it it just doesn't look that nice. Also the metro design doesn't look as nice when working in a vertical view. Short version is that metro is minimalism done wrong and just doesn't work that well because it is basically flat without much depth or lacking in effects in instances when it could use it for function if not visual benefits. Just look at the design of the scroll bar they have now when you use the mouse in the desktop or metro environment, hideous.

Touch is the future and I don't think everyone disagrees. I like touch for entertainment and basic tasks but I would never do my design work or typing with touch. So far it has been impractical. Which is why loading directly into desktop would benefit someone like me who uses the desktop more often. Touch so far is really only for basic tasks like watching a video and looking at pictures and such I would never use it for much more than that. I would not be editing my videos or editing my photos or other stuff on a desktop. Short version Touch is useful for basic tasks but for anything that is more advanced desktop is still the way to go for now so forcing us into touch is not right as we would use it when there is such a need.
 

My Computer

Kat

Banned
I'd just like to add that I'm beginning to find it rather tiresome (and offensive) for people
to insist that my dislike of Win 8 is because I 'won't adapt' or 'won't learn new ways'.

I've been doing EXACTLY that, ever since the days of GEOS.

How patronising.....
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 Enterprise 64-bit (7 Ult, Vista & XP in V-Box)
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Acer Aspire Ethos AS8951G 'Super-Laptop'.
    CPU
    Intel Sandy-Bridge i7-2670QM quad-core
    Motherboard
    Acer
    Memory
    8GB DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel 3000HD / Ge-Force GT555M 2 gigs
    Sound Card
    Realtek/5.1 Dolby built-in including speakers.
    Monitor(s) Displays
    18.4" full-HD
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1024
    Hard Drives
    2x750GB Toshiba internal, 1x500GB Seagate external, 1x2TB Seagate external, 1x640GB Toshiba pocket-drive, 1x640GB Samsung pocket drive.
    PSU
    Stock
    Case
    Laptop
    Cooling
    Air-cooled
    Mouse
    I/R cordless.
    Internet Speed
    Borderline pathetic.

Dave76

Team Member
VIP Member
Pro User
"Fear of change" =M$ talking point to ANY dislike of Window 8.

Reality =
Touch UI is completely impractical for the desktop environment for the forseeable future.

What I see is many users making completely reasonable and logical complaints about Metro and Touch UI for the desktop and even laptop environment.

Unless M$ thinks humans are going to grow two extra sets of arms, or hell use some kind of
"thought" UI for desktops in the next 50 years is to be seen, but for the time being touch is just not possible. The mouse and keyboard will continue to rule, not because of some nonsense M$ is peddling aobut "fear of change" but instead of completely practical and reasonable limitations for the human use.

Most importantly nobody, INCLUDING myself is saying not to allow Metro or touch UI in desktops, what folks like myself are suggesting is to offer the user the CHOICE of which default UI to use when initially setting up their new Windows 8 OS.

It seems to me that M$ has a fear of giving the customer a choice.
:busted:

Agree, there should be an initial option for booting to desktop or metro.
This is a transition UI and it would be an easier transition if everyone had the ability to make their choice default.
The current boot to Metro goes against the MS much repeated "No Compromise" statements, evidently their meaning is not the same as some of their customers.

Although this is not a show stopper for me, I understand that it might be for many others.

IMHO the touch screen is obviously not usable for many applications, as previously mentioned, spreadsheets, graphics manipulation, and many more. It may be a while until touch screens are the standard, but they may be usable for some scenarios in daily use. For some it may never be acceptable, for others maybe 5% of the time, for casual users it could be 90% or more.
As long as the keyboard and mouse are still usable along with touch screen I will try it out. I won't run down and buy a large touch screen monitor to try it but will likely get a touch screen on my next laptop.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64/ Windows 7 Ult x64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    76~2.0
    CPU
    Intel Core i5-3570K 4.6GHz
    Motherboard
    GIGABYTE GA-Z77X UD3H f18
    Memory
    8GB (2X4GB) DDR3 1600 CORSAIR Vengeance CL8 1.5v
    Graphics Card(s)
    Sapphire HD 7770 Vapor-X 1GB DDR5
    Sound Card
    Onboard VIA VT2021
    Monitor(s) Displays
    22" LCD Dell SP2208WFP
    Screen Resolution
    1680x1050
    Hard Drives
    Samaung 840Pro 128GB, Seagate 500GB SATA2 7200rpm 32mb, Seagate 1TB SATA2 7200rpm 32mb,
    PSU
    Corsair HX650W
    Case
    Cooler Master Storm Scout
    Cooling
    Corsair H80 w/Noctua NF P12 12cm fan, case fans 2X14cm
    Keyboard
    Logitech Wave
    Mouse
    CM Sentinel
    Internet Speed
    Abysmal
    Browser
    Opera Next
    Other Info
    Dell Venue 8Pro: Baytrail Z3740D, 2GB Ram, 64GB HDD, 8" IPS Display 1280 x 800, Active Stylus.
    Haswell laptop: HP Envy 17t-j, i7-4700MQ, GeForce 740M 2GB DDR3, 17.3" Full HD 1920x1080, 16GB RAM, Samsung 840 Pro 128GB, 1TB Hitachi 7200 HDD,
    Desktop: eSATA ports,
    External eSATA Seagate 500GB SATA2 7200rpm,

ssbtech

Member
Member
1) There's NO need for a "touch friendly" interface on a desktop PC or laptop that will be used primarily with a Keyboard and Mouse. Metro might be nice on a tablet/slate PC, but for most users who are familiar and comfortable with the way Windows has been for many many years, this will be an unwelcome shock.

2) Every tablet/slate PC that I've poked at running Windows 7 was quite friendly to use. The benefit of full Windows functionality was great without being confined to a restrictive iOS/Android interface.

Ever been using an iOS/Android tablet only to say "When I get back to my main PC I can finish this up more quickly/easily"? With Windows 8, your main PC will now be emulating iDroid whether you like it or not.

Really, all Microsoft needed to do was make Metro an application that can be launched as a cloud aggregator just like Media Center is a media aggregator. I can't stand "cloud computing" so I have little to no use for Metro, so I'd like a choice.

And here's my Windows 7 Start Menu, just to show you why I hate, hate, hate the idea of being locked into something resembling Duplo blocks:

7Start.jpg
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Built by me
    CPU
    AMD Quad Core something
    Motherboard
    Asus
    Memory
    5GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    nVidia something hacked with Quadro drivers
    Sound Card
    Asus Xonar
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2x LCD
    Hard Drives
    A few of them
    PSU
    Corsair HX750
    Case
    Antec Sonata Elite
    Cooling
    Couple of fans
    Keyboard
    Logitech backlit wireless
    Mouse
    Logitech rechargable Laser Mouse
    Internet Speed
    25Mbps
Looking at your Start menu, I've just remembered why I don't like the Start Menu. Go into Metro and right click, you'll see much the same thing. Also if you know the name of the App, type the first letter on the Start screen, much simpler.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 Pro/Windows 8 Pro/Windows 7 64 Bit64Bit/Windows XP

mart4494

New Member
Member
It seems to me that M$ has a fear of giving the customer a choice. :busted:

Of course they do. It's not the end user that has the fear of change it is MS. MS are terrified of their future income stream drying up - they need the end users to open up their wallets for app downloads and subscription cloud services. If they gave the option of Metro or Classic UI at install time then they wouldn't achieve their goal.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win7 & 8 64bit / Linux Mint 14
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    i5 2400
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI HD3870
    Sound Card
    On-board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Asus
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1280
    Hard Drives
    128gb SSD, 500gb SATA
    PSU
    Coolermaster
    Case
    Zalman Z7
    Cooling
    Air
    Keyboard
    Logitech Illuminated wired
    Mouse
    MS Optical wireless
    Antivirus
    Avast

mart4494

New Member
Member

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win7 & 8 64bit / Linux Mint 14
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    i5 2400
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI HD3870
    Sound Card
    On-board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Asus
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1280
    Hard Drives
    128gb SSD, 500gb SATA
    PSU
    Coolermaster
    Case
    Zalman Z7
    Cooling
    Air
    Keyboard
    Logitech Illuminated wired
    Mouse
    MS Optical wireless
    Antivirus
    Avast

Pikey

Member
Member
After reading all the doom and gloom over the past few months regarding Windows 8 I decided to see what all the fuss was about and downloaded the CP 2 days ago and installed it on seperate SSD I had lying around. At first I agreed with the nay sayers. My opinion quickly changed, however. Here is my experience:

....

Nice post DA!
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7 64bit SP1

SmartEyeball

No. 14
Team Member
VIP Member
Pro User
. Also if you know the name of the App, type the first letter on the Start screen, much simpler.

Tbh, typing the first letter in the search bar of the start menu was even simpler.

Going to metro, searching and then going back just adds another redundant step.

A 'hover' search in desktop mode would be even better. (similar to the Bing bar, but for apps). Toing and froing from metro is really giving me the shits now.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Vanilla 8 Pro x64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    SmartEyeball Custom Systems
    CPU
    Intel 3770K @4.8ghz
    Motherboard
    ASUS P8Z77 WS
    Memory
    16GB G.Skill Trident 2666mhz
    Graphics Card(s)
    3x Gigabyte GTX 670 OC WindForce SLI
    Sound Card
    SB X-FI Surround 5.1 PRO USB + ATH-AD900 Headphones
    Monitor(s) Displays
    x3 Dell U2410 / 58" Samsung / "40 Sony
    Screen Resolution
    5760*1200/1920*1200 / 1920*1080
    Hard Drives
    2x Intel 520 240GB * Crucial M4 128GB * 2x Samsung F3 1TB (RAID 0) * 2x WD Caviar Blacks 2TB (RAID 0)
    PSU
    Corsair AX1200
    Case
    Thermaltake Level 10 GT Snow Edition
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D14
    Keyboard
    Topre Realforce // Ducky Shine MX Black // Filco Ninja TKL
    Mouse
    Razer Imperator + Thermaltake Theron
    Other Info
    Laptop Specs: Clevo Sager P170HM // 17.3 Matte 1920x1200 // i7 2720QM // 8GB 1333mhz // Dedicated GTX 485M // 240GB Intel 520 + 750GB + Blu-Ray // Samsung Story 2TB USB 3.0 // NexStar USB 3.0 enclosure 500GB
This is probably not going to help either, what about pinning your most used Apps to the taskbar and if you need another one hit the Windows key and then the first letter of the App.
Problem is if you hate it you hate it, maybe wait for Windows 9.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 Pro/Windows 8 Pro/Windows 7 64 Bit64Bit/Windows XP

windude99

New Member
Member
If you are using the Consumer Preview right now, then you are not going to like Windows 8 a lot. The Release Preview is so, so much better. It is fast and fluid and very stable. If you don't like the Consumer Preview of Windows 8, then give the Release Preview a try. It is way better.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7 Professional
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP Pavilion P7-1010
    CPU
    AMD Athlon X4 645 3.1ghz
    Motherboard
    Foxxcon N-Alvorix RSS80
    Memory
    6GB DDR3 1066
    Graphics Card(s)
    Sapphire Radeon HD 5670
    Sound Card
    Realtek Integrated Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    HP 2011x
    Screen Resolution
    1600x900
    Hard Drives
    1. 128gb Crucial M4
    2. Seagate Barracuda 1tb 7200.12rpm
    3. Western Digital Caviar Green 1tb 5400rpm
    PSU
    Seasonic 380b
    Case
    HP OEM
    Cooling
    Coolermaster Heatsink and Fan
    Keyboard
    HP OEM
    Mouse
    HP OEM
    Internet Speed
    20 Megabits down/ 4 up

ssbtech

Member
Member
This is probably not going to help either, what about pinning your most used Apps to the taskbar and if you need another one hit the Windows key and then the first letter of the App.
Problem is if you hate it you hate it, maybe wait for Windows 9.

I don't like the pinned icons on the taskbar either. First modification I do to Windows 7: Shrink the oversized taskbar with small icons, get rid of the silly pinning and restore the QuickLaunch menu for a few things I want access to quickly such as IE, the snipping tool, and my Asus Xonar control panel so I can easily switch between speakers/headphones.


I use Stardock's Fences to organize frequently used icons and applications on my desktop.

Some of the more obscure applications such as the little ones for converting video files and other infrequently used applications reside in the start menu. Half the time I forget the names of them so typing their name into the search box doesn't work for me.

I quite dislike the Vista/7 way of stuffing all the folders/shortcuts into one little list in the Start menu, so I use "Classsic Shell" to give me the XP style programs list.

I don't think Metro will be good for handling large numbers of applications.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Built by me
    CPU
    AMD Quad Core something
    Motherboard
    Asus
    Memory
    5GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    nVidia something hacked with Quadro drivers
    Sound Card
    Asus Xonar
    Monitor(s) Displays
    2x LCD
    Hard Drives
    A few of them
    PSU
    Corsair HX750
    Case
    Antec Sonata Elite
    Cooling
    Couple of fans
    Keyboard
    Logitech backlit wireless
    Mouse
    Logitech rechargable Laser Mouse
    Internet Speed
    25Mbps

FSeal

New Member
Member
The mere fact that this new interface so utterly polarises even the most die-hard windows fans is alone enough evidence of it's problem.

The Microsoft feedback on the preview releases have shown an almost even 50/50 love/hate split. I don;t think I've see that much division in the windows camp in my entire , from the start, windows career.

And while there may be /some/ resistance to change in there, it's not enough to explain that ratio.

Personally I LOVE change, I love new things, and I want Windows to be great and kick the living crap out of everyone else. I'm always installing the betas and excitedly looking to what's new. Metro... disappoints me greatly on my desktop.

Metro for tablets and phones, desktop for laptops and desktops. At least as a choice for people that spend 12 hours a day working on their machines. Metro brings nothing to the table at all when the computer is used as a tool instead of another neat gadget.

I might love a touch interface on an LCARS type wall mounted AIW 32 inch computer (as a choice) but nothing like that at all on my desktop thank you.

As it may be said, "One simply cannot... merge ALL forms of computing into a singular interface", no matter how much Star Trek those Metro designers have watched. :)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7/8

SIW2

Well-Known Member
Team Member
If you are using the Consumer Preview right now, then you are not going to like Windows 8 a lot. The Release Preview is so, so much better. It is fast and fluid and very stable. If you don't like the Consumer Preview of Windows 8, then give the Release Preview a try. It is way better.

In what way?

It looks less awful - which is something.

I don't see anything else to get excited about.

Mine isn't fast - neither was CP - a lot of activity for a few minutes after booting up.

People used to complain about that with Vista.

It might be windows defender making it go slow.

When I get the chance, might investigate that.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    7/8/ubuntu/Linux Deepin
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop

gazz9496

Removed by request
it's odd i rather like the metro style start menu...the problem i have with it is just how utterly pointless it seems.

apps..oh how i loathe thee, apps in my mind are cut down half assed versions of full software that should work.

the hardest thing they will encounter is those that wish to upgrade their os from windows 7 to windows 8 and find it really doesn't work that well without touchscreen, then find people buying a touch screen and not knowing how best to set it up so it doesn't just bug the life out of them and get in the way of their keyboard and mouse and still be at a reasonable distance that they don't want to just smash it with a hammer because it has to be in arms reach at all times to be worth having.

the conversion to touch screen just isn't going to suit most people, and the reasonable cost of a decent touch screen with a stable stand that feels good to use isn't cheap either, and then there is getting it in the right position at just the right distance and just the right height and so many other variables that it may mean changing alot of in the office just to have it. not a cost i currently see as something many wish to take up.

personally i just can't see windows 8 being taken up that well on desktops, i love it on my netbook runs great no problems at all, tried it on my desktop and it just felt pointless not an upgrade worth thinking about.

so I like windows 8 on smaller devices but it just feels lost and really does look weird on giant desktop screens. just how much is a 27" touchscreen ? well an oridinary 27" monitor is around £300 and then there is this....3M MicroTouch M2767PW 27 inch Touchscreen Monitor Display (1080p Full HD, 120Hz, HDMI input, 40 Finger Multi-Touch): Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories oh yup i just see it now swaithes of you all running out and buying one of these.....you could buy 2 fairly decent computers for that price.

i'd say microsoft have a bigger problem than just their start menu being crap, the fact that decent touch screens cost either the same as the pc or more is a far far bigger problem.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    .
    System Manufacturer/Model
    .
    CPU
    .
    Motherboard
    .
    Memory
    .
    Graphics Card(s)
    .
    Monitor(s) Displays
    .
    Hard Drives
    .
    PSU
    .
    Case
    .
    Cooling
    .
    Keyboard
    .
    Mouse
    .
    Internet Speed
    .

Coke Robot

New Member
Pro User
Gold Member
1) There's NO need for a "touch friendly" interface on a desktop PC or laptop that will be used primarily with a Keyboard and Mouse. Metro might be nice on a tablet/slate PC, but for most users who are familiar and comfortable with the way Windows has been for many many years, this will be an unwelcome shock.

2) Every tablet/slate PC that I've poked at running Windows 7 was quite friendly to use. The benefit of full Windows functionality was great without being confined to a restrictive iOS/Android interface.

Ever been using an iOS/Android tablet only to say "When I get back to my main PC I can finish this up more quickly/easily"? With Windows 8, your main PC will now be emulating iDroid whether you like it or not.

Really, all Microsoft needed to do was make Metro an application that can be launched as a cloud aggregator just like Media Center is a media aggregator. I can't stand "cloud computing" so I have little to no use for Metro, so I'd like a choice.

And here's my Windows 7 Start Menu, just to show you why I hate, hate, hate the idea of being locked into something resembling Duplo blocks:

7Start.jpg

Your start menu reminds me of the xp days with the flyouts that took more than half the Desktop, and then moving the mouse cursor a few pixels from the last flyout and everything vanishing..... oh man.... :doh:
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS
    CPU
    AMD FX 8320
    Motherboard
    Crosshair V Formula-Z
    Memory
    16 gig DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS R9 270
    Screen Resolution
    1440x900
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Seagate Barracuda (starting to hate Seagate)
    x2 3 TB Toshibas
    Windows 8.1 is installed on a SanDisk Ultra Plus 256 GB
    PSU
    OCZ 500 watt
    Case
    A current work in progres as I'll be building the physical case myself. It shall be fantastic.
    Cooling
    Arctic Cooler with 3 heatpipes
    Keyboard
    Logitech K750 wireless solar powered keyboard
    Mouse
    Microsoft Touch Mouse
    Browser
    Internet Explorer 11
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, but I might go back on KIS 2014

Coke Robot

New Member
Pro User
Gold Member
The mere fact that this new interface so utterly polarises even the most die-hard windows fans is alone enough evidence of it's problem.

The Microsoft feedback on the preview releases have shown an almost even 50/50 love/hate split. I don;t think I've see that much division in the windows camp in my entire , from the start, windows career.

And while there may be /some/ resistance to change in there, it's not enough to explain that ratio.

Personally I LOVE change, I love new things, and I want Windows to be great and kick the living crap out of everyone else. I'm always installing the betas and excitedly looking to what's new. Metro... disappoints me greatly on my desktop.

Metro for tablets and phones, desktop for laptops and desktops. At least as a choice for people that spend 12 hours a day working on their machines. Metro brings nothing to the table at all when the computer is used as a tool instead of another neat gadget.

I might love a touch interface on an LCARS type wall mounted AIW 32 inch computer (as a choice) but nothing like that at all on my desktop thank you.

As it may be said, "One simply cannot... merge ALL forms of computing into a singular interface", no matter how much Star Trek those Metro designers have watched. :)
That's metro design for you, you will either love it or hate it and there is really not a bunch of fence sitters. I love the metro design, I got myself immersed in it a couple years ago by using the Zune Software, which by the way, if you want to use THE best metro styled Desktop app out there, one must download it!
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS
    CPU
    AMD FX 8320
    Motherboard
    Crosshair V Formula-Z
    Memory
    16 gig DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS R9 270
    Screen Resolution
    1440x900
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Seagate Barracuda (starting to hate Seagate)
    x2 3 TB Toshibas
    Windows 8.1 is installed on a SanDisk Ultra Plus 256 GB
    PSU
    OCZ 500 watt
    Case
    A current work in progres as I'll be building the physical case myself. It shall be fantastic.
    Cooling
    Arctic Cooler with 3 heatpipes
    Keyboard
    Logitech K750 wireless solar powered keyboard
    Mouse
    Microsoft Touch Mouse
    Browser
    Internet Explorer 11
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, but I might go back on KIS 2014

Coke Robot

New Member
Pro User
Gold Member
If you are using the Consumer Preview right now, then you are not going to like Windows 8 a lot. The Release Preview is so, so much better. It is fast and fluid and very stable. If you don't like the Consumer Preview of Windows 8, then give the Release Preview a try. It is way better.

In what way?

It looks less awful - which is something.

I don't see anything else to get excited about.

Mine isn't fast - neither was CP - a lot of activity for a few minutes after booting up.

People used to complain about that with Vista.

It might be windows defender making it go slow.

When I get the chance, might investigate that.

Windows 8 is running slow on you? Is that even possible?

I haven't had a slowdown from using Windows 8 ever since I started using the Developer Preview. Every build, even the leaked milestone builds, have been fast except for one alpha build.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS
    CPU
    AMD FX 8320
    Motherboard
    Crosshair V Formula-Z
    Memory
    16 gig DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS R9 270
    Screen Resolution
    1440x900
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Seagate Barracuda (starting to hate Seagate)
    x2 3 TB Toshibas
    Windows 8.1 is installed on a SanDisk Ultra Plus 256 GB
    PSU
    OCZ 500 watt
    Case
    A current work in progres as I'll be building the physical case myself. It shall be fantastic.
    Cooling
    Arctic Cooler with 3 heatpipes
    Keyboard
    Logitech K750 wireless solar powered keyboard
    Mouse
    Microsoft Touch Mouse
    Browser
    Internet Explorer 11
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, but I might go back on KIS 2014

Coke Robot

New Member
Pro User
Gold Member
This is probably not going to help either, what about pinning your most used Apps to the taskbar and if you need another one hit the Windows key and then the first letter of the App.
Problem is if you hate it you hate it, maybe wait for Windows 9.

I don't like the pinned icons on the taskbar either. First modification I do to Windows 7: Shrink the oversized taskbar with small icons, get rid of the silly pinning and restore the QuickLaunch menu for a few things I want access to quickly such as IE, the snipping tool, and my Asus Xonar control panel so I can easily switch between speakers/headphones.


I use Stardock's Fences to organize frequently used icons and applications on my desktop.

Some of the more obscure applications such as the little ones for converting video files and other infrequently used applications reside in the start menu. Half the time I forget the names of them so typing their name into the search box doesn't work for me.

I quite dislike the Vista/7 way of stuffing all the folders/shortcuts into one little list in the Start menu, so I use "Classsic Shell" to give me the XP style programs list.

I don't think Metro will be good for handling large numbers of applications.
I think the Windows 7 taskbar WAS a huge Quicklaunch bar... :)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS
    CPU
    AMD FX 8320
    Motherboard
    Crosshair V Formula-Z
    Memory
    16 gig DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS R9 270
    Screen Resolution
    1440x900
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Seagate Barracuda (starting to hate Seagate)
    x2 3 TB Toshibas
    Windows 8.1 is installed on a SanDisk Ultra Plus 256 GB
    PSU
    OCZ 500 watt
    Case
    A current work in progres as I'll be building the physical case myself. It shall be fantastic.
    Cooling
    Arctic Cooler with 3 heatpipes
    Keyboard
    Logitech K750 wireless solar powered keyboard
    Mouse
    Microsoft Touch Mouse
    Browser
    Internet Explorer 11
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, but I might go back on KIS 2014

crawfish

Member
Power User
i'd say microsoft have a bigger problem than just their start menu being crap, the fact that decent touch screens cost either the same as the pc or more is a far far bigger problem.

The biggest problem of all is the dearth of applications for the PC form factor that are by their nature amenable to touch. Word processors? Nah. Spreadsheets? Forget it. Message boards? Not on your life. Basically anything that involves a lot of typing or benefits from the precision of the mouse just doesn't translate well to touch. Then there is the awkwardness of reaching out in front to touch the screen, which requires you to be close enough, obscures what you're touching, and smudges the screen. I guess programs that closely emulate the interfaces of physical devices can benefit, such as digital audio workstation software, which tend to have lots of sliders, rotary controls, etc. A child's fingerpainting program would benefit. Anything else?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center
Top