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Solved Installing Hyper-V disables most video applications

mfaklis

New Member
When I install Windows 8 Pro x64 Hyper-V, most video applications stop working, even when the Hyper-V services are disabled. The affected applications include DVD players, store-based Netflix and Hulu, among others. For some reason I can still watch Netflix and Hulu if I use the desktop IE. I have plenty of excess processing power available, so I would like to keep a couple Hyper-V VMs running.

What can I do to remedy the problem? Hyper-V is my preferred choice since my network servers (3) are all running on a Hyper-V server. Full Video capabilities return to normal upon uninstalling Hyper-V, but then so do my virtual machines.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    WIndows 8 Pro

cluberti

Cat herder
VIP Member
Pro User
Hyper-V makes changes to the way the OS works (it becomes a privileged virtual machine, for all intents and purposes), and a lot of the changes come in the form of power management and video subsystem - video acceleration is actually a big problem for hypervisors, and the OS changes in that area specifically when you enable Hyper-V on the client.

It might help if we knew what the hardware was, and what drivers you were using (video specifically), but it sounds like your video hardware or software/firmware doesn't like being virtualized, at least from the description you offered.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 x64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Custom
    CPU
    Intel Core i7 4790K @ 4.5GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus Maximus Hero VII
    Memory
    32GB DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia GeForce GTX970
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD Audio
    Hard Drives
    1x Samsung 250GB SSD
    4x WD RE 2TB (RAIDZ)
    PSU
    Corsair AX760i
    Case
    Fractal Design Define R4
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15

popeye

New Member
VIP Member
Guru
Why I like VMWare Player. Tried Hyper-v and didn't like the way it screwed with the system.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit
    Computer type
    Laptop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Acer V3 771G-6443
    CPU
    i5-3230m
    Motherboard
    Acer VA70_HC (U3E1)
    Memory
    8GB DDR3 PC3-12800 (800 MHz)
    Graphics Card(s)
    HD4000 + GeForce GT 730M
    Sound Card
    Realtek High Definition Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    17" Generic PnP Display on Intel HD Graphics 4000
    Screen Resolution
    1600x900 pixels
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 850 EVO 250 GB
    ADATA SSD SP900 128GB
    PSU
    90 watt brick
    Mouse
    Bluetooth
    Antivirus
    Comodo
    Other Info
    Asus RT-AC56R dual-band WRT router (Merlin firmware). Intel 7260.HMWWB.R dual-band ac wireless adapter.

mfaklis

New Member
Attached is a System Information report. I have no idea how to determine the offensive device/driver since it works so well without Hyper-V installed. How would I determine. I'm ignorant about the assertion that installing Hyper-V changes to host OS to a virtual machine. How is the host's VM managed? How can I disable video acceleration?
txt.gif
systeminfo.txt (165.6 KB)
 

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My Computer

System One

  • OS
    WIndows 8 Pro

Kari

Old geek, new tricks
Team Member
VIP Member
Pro User
It might of course be that I am misunderstanding something here but in my opinion you should search for the reason for your video issue somewhere else.

When you install / enable Hyper-V in Windows 8 / 8.1 it does most certainly not touch the host video drivers, not alter them in any way. The only thing which in my opinion could even remotely cause some issues is the Hyper-V virtual switches; although not sure if this is even possible I could think of a scenario where a program like Windows Store app for Netflix is installed and setup when Hyper-V was not enabled and no virtual switches existed, then when Hyper-V is enabled and your PC uses virtual switches for networking, some setting in Netflix app would still be looking for the physical NIC and when not finding it would not work.

Far fetched, I know, but you could at least test this scenario.

When you have enabled Hyper-V and created the virtual switches, your Windows host uses them for networking even when no virtual machines are running. See screenshot, Windows on your host uses the external switches (LAN and if exists WLAN, highlighted green) to communicate with network passing the traffic through the real physical NICs (highlighted yellow):

2014-12-20_18h01_05.png
(Click to enlarge.)​

Now disable the external switches:

2014-12-20_18h02_32.png

Reboot, check that external switches really are disabled:

2014-12-20_18h03_48.png

Now your Windows host will connect using the physical NICs directly. Launch the Netflix app to see if it is able to connect.

Kari
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center
    Computer type
    Laptop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP ENVY 17-1150eg
    CPU
    1.6 GHz Intel Core i7-720QM Processor
    Memory
    6 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5850 Graphics
    Sound Card
    Beats sound system with integrated subwoofer
    Monitor(s) Displays
    17" laptop display, 22" LED and 32" Full HD TV through HDMI
    Screen Resolution
    1600*900 (1), 1920*1080 (2&3)
    Hard Drives
    Internal: 2 x 500 GB SATA Hard Disk Drive 7200 rpm
    External: 2TB for backups, 3TB USB3 network drive for media
    Cooling
    As Envy runs a bit warm, I have it on a Cooler Master pad
    Keyboard
    Logitech diNovo Media Desktop Laser (bluetooth)
    Mouse
    Logitech MX1000 Laser (Bluetooth)
    Internet Speed
    50 MB VDSL
    Browser
    Maxthon 3.5.2., IE11
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender 4.3.9431.0
    Other Info
    Windows in English, additional user accounts in Finnish, German and Swedish.

mfaklis

New Member
My desktop has multiple NICs. One is allocated to the Win 8.1 Pro host, and the other is allocated to hyper-V. No NICs are shared. When I uninstall Hyper-V (to perhaps watch a DVD), I disable the NIC allocated to hyper-V, to avoid conflicts caused by having multiple NICs which are not shared.

With Hyper-V installed, the problem affects only store apps for watching video (Netflix, Hulu), and conventional apps for watching DVDs (PowerDVD 13 Ultra and WinDVD Pro). I can still view video via the browser (Netflix, Hulu).

I had no problems with Windows 7 Ultimate with Virtual PC for Windows 7.

I have posted this problem on multiple support forums.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    WIndows 8 Pro

jimbo45

New Member
VIP Member
Guru
Hi there

For all sorts of reasons HYPER-V is not my preferred solution -- at least for typical HOME users where you have all sorts of hardware and applications that could tax a VM to the limit.

I Know Kari is a big fan of HYPER-V so I'm sure if it's possible he'll sort you out.

I've found that for things like NETFLIX and SKY GO VMware works perfectly well so long as you enable 3-D and hardware acceleration.

However if HYPER-V can be made to work successfully for you there's no reason not to use it.

I do like the facility though of being able to boot totally from an external SSD a LINUX Host and run a Windows VM Guest and boot this SSD from almost any machine. I think if you want to do this with Windows you'll have to create a Windows to Go system (Enterprise only) and then bring up your VM on that. Could be an interesting experiment to see if HYPER-V runs with decent performance from an externally booted Windows to Go system.. I'd suggest if you try this do it with an SSD.

BTW I'm avoiding mounting virtual drives and booting as I want my external system to be able to boot even if there's NO functioning HDD in the HOST.

Cheers
jimbo
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Linux Centos 7, W8.1, W7, W2K3 Server W10
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Monitor(s) Displays
    1 X LG 40 inch TV
    Hard Drives
    SSD's * 3 (Samsung 840 series) 250 GB
    2 X 3 TB sata
    5 X 1 TB sata
    Internet Speed
    0.12 GB/s (120Mb/s)

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