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Hyper-V - How to Use in Windows 8

How to Create a Hyper-V Virtual Machine in Windows 8 and 8.1

information   Information
The Hyper-V technology provides an environment that you can use to create and manage virtual machines and their resources. Each virtual machine is an isolated, virtualized computer system that is capable of running its own operating system. This allows you to run multiple operating systems at the same time on the same physical computer.

This tutorial will show you how to use the built-in Hyper Virtualisation (Hyper-V) in Windows 8 Pro or Windows 8 Enterprise to install and run a guest OS.

Note   Note
You will need to enable the Hyper-V components as detailed under Preparation first before proceeding. Note that not all systems will support this, so if yours doesn't, you won't be able to go any further. Sorry.

To create a Hyper-V client, you must have a 64-bit version of Windows 8 Pro or Windows 8 Enterprise with a 64-bit CPU that supports SLAT (Second Level Address Translation). You’ll also need at least 4GB of RAM. Hyper-V does support creation of both 32-bit and 64-bit operating systems in the VMs.

For more info, see also: Bringing Hyper-V to "Windows 8"



Preparation:

The first thing we need to do is to enable the Hyper-V components. To do this, we need to turn them on.

Open Windows Features. Provide Administrative credentials if prompted by UAC.

Expand the Hyper-V sub-section and ensure that all options are checked (ticked) as shown below. Click on OK and restart your computer to apply changes.

Windows-Features.jpg

If all options remain checked after a reboot, and you haven't received any error messages, then you are good to go. Continue with the next section, Here's How:. If not, then I'm sorry but your system doesn't support this feature.


Here's How:

If you have successfully carried out the Preparation, you will notice a couple of new icons on the Metro Start Page. These are Hyper-V Manager and Hyper-V Virtual Machine...

1. In order to install a guest OS (and I'm using Windows Vista Ultimate SP2 x86 for this Tutorial), we need to run the Hyper-V Manager, so click on its icon. to bring up the following screen:
Capture1.PNG

2. In order to allow the guest OS to have network access, we need to make a configuration change. Under the Actions panel, click Virtual Switch Manager... from above.

3. We need to create an External type switch, so ensure that this option is highlighted as shown and then click Create virtual switch.
Capture10.PNG

4. Ensure that the options are set as shown below (note that the actual name of the adapter will depend on your hardware) and then click OK.
Capture11.PNG

5. Take note of the above warning, and click Yes to complete the operation. You will then be returned to the Hyper-V Manager.
Capture12.PNG

6. Under the Actions panel, click New and then Virtual Machine... to bring up the following screen:
Capture2.PNG

7. To move through the screens of the Wizard, click Next and to review settings, click Previous. Click Next to continue.

Here, I have given a suitable name for my guest OS (the Virtual Machine). You can choose a location to save this VM to, but here I have left it as the default. Click Next to continue.
Capture3.PNG

8. I have assigned 1024MB of RAM for this VM (this figure will depend on the amount of RAM you have installed), and I have also checked the option Enable Hyper-V to manage the memory amount dynamically for this VM. Click Next to continue.
Capture4.PNG

9. In the Connection: dropbox, select the adapter you created earlier. Click on Next to continue.
Capture5.PNG

10. The only option that you should need to change here is the Size: of the virtual hard disk. I have changed mine to 32GB. Click Next to continue.
Capture6.PNG

11. Here, I have specified the source .iso file that will be used for the installation. Click Next to continue.
Capture7.PNG

12. This screen is just a summary of the previous ones. If you want to make any changes before committing yourself, you can do so by using Previous and Next to move through the other screens. When you are satisfied, click on Finish to continue. The Virtual Hard Disk will now be created, and you will then see the following screen.
Capture8.PNG

13. Under the Actions panel, click Start to run the VM. Note that there might be a slight delay the first time it is run. Click on Connect... to bring up the main screen. Alternatively, double-click the image to expand the main screen.
Capture9.PNG

14. If you click inside this screen, your cursor will be captured and will then only function in the VM. Install the OS just as you would normally. Note that installation will be slower under a VM compared to a native (normal) install.
Capture13.PNG



 

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churin

Member
Member
Thanks Hopachi for your follow-ups. The Integrated Services solved most of my problems. It appears that only way to transfer data between the guest and the host is via network. For example copy and paste across the host's desktop and the guest's desktop does not work.

Is there a way to add a data drive beside the system drive within the guest OS? This is not so important but I am just curious to know.

Only problem the Integration Services did not solve is the sound card. Does anyone know how to go about enabling the sound card?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    W10 Pro/W8.1 Pro/ W7 Ult
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    AMD FX 6300 x6
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte GA-970A-UD3
    Memory
    8GBx2 DDR3 1866 G.Skill F3-1866C9D-16GXM
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon R7 360
    Sound Card
    Asus Xonar DS
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Dell P2715Q
    Screen Resolution
    3840 x 2160
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 840Pro SSD 256GB, Samsung 850 Pro 1TBx2 RAID1
    PSU
    Corsair CX430M 500W
    Case
    Corsair 200R
    Cooling
    Zallman CNPS5X
    Internet Speed
    180Mbps/12Mbps
    Browser
    Firefox & IE
    Other Info
    BD Writer LG WH14NS40, DVD RW Pioneer DVR-218L

Kebero

New Member
Member
You don't get sound in Hyper-V unless you connect to the child OS via remote desktop.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows Server 2012 Standard w/Hyper-V
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP ProBook 4430s
    CPU
    Intel Core i3-2310M
    Memory
    16GB DDR3
    Hard Drives
    80GB Intel 320 SSD
    500GB Samsung Momentus

Hopachi

Polyhedric Stellation
VIP Member
Pro User
Thanks Hopachi for your follow-ups. The Integrated Services solved most of my problems.

You're welcome Churin.:)

You're right about transferring data via network, that's just the way it is.

About sound: I don't have that either. :(
But as Kebero said:
You don't get sound in Hyper-V unless you connect to the child OS via remote desktop.
We'll need to find out how to do this step.:think:

Didn't used any remote desktops in Hyper-V yet...

Regards
Hopachi
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 x64
    Computer type
    Laptop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy DV6 7250
    CPU
    Intel i7-3630QM
    Motherboard
    HP, Intel HM77 Express Chipset
    Memory
    16GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel HD4000 + Nvidia Geforce 630M
    Sound Card
    IDT HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6' built-in + Samsung S22D300 + 17.3' LG Phillips
    Screen Resolution
    multiple resolutions
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 250GB + Hitachi HDD 750GB
    PSU
    120W adapter
    Case
    small
    Cooling
    laptop cooling pad
    Keyboard
    Backlit built-in + big one in USB
    Mouse
    SteelSeries Sensei
    Internet Speed
    slow and steady
    Browser
    Chromium, Pale Moon, Firefox Developer Edition
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    That's basically it.

churin

Member
Member
You don't get sound in Hyper-V
Does this mean that the sound can not be enabled on the guest OS?


unless you connect to the child OS via remote desktop.
Does this mean that the sound on the guest OS can be used from the host or any other OS on the network through remote desktop session.
This and the above conflicts with each other, so that answer to one or both of them must be negative. Clarification is appreciated.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    W10 Pro/W8.1 Pro/ W7 Ult
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    AMD FX 6300 x6
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte GA-970A-UD3
    Memory
    8GBx2 DDR3 1866 G.Skill F3-1866C9D-16GXM
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon R7 360
    Sound Card
    Asus Xonar DS
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Dell P2715Q
    Screen Resolution
    3840 x 2160
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 840Pro SSD 256GB, Samsung 850 Pro 1TBx2 RAID1
    PSU
    Corsair CX430M 500W
    Case
    Corsair 200R
    Cooling
    Zallman CNPS5X
    Internet Speed
    180Mbps/12Mbps
    Browser
    Firefox & IE
    Other Info
    BD Writer LG WH14NS40, DVD RW Pioneer DVR-218L

churin

Member
Member
I am using two monitors each having 1600x1200 and 2550x1440, but maximus resolution for the guest OS of WXP I can set is 1600x1200. Is this the limitation of XP?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    W10 Pro/W8.1 Pro/ W7 Ult
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    AMD FX 6300 x6
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte GA-970A-UD3
    Memory
    8GBx2 DDR3 1866 G.Skill F3-1866C9D-16GXM
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon R7 360
    Sound Card
    Asus Xonar DS
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Dell P2715Q
    Screen Resolution
    3840 x 2160
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 840Pro SSD 256GB, Samsung 850 Pro 1TBx2 RAID1
    PSU
    Corsair CX430M 500W
    Case
    Corsair 200R
    Cooling
    Zallman CNPS5X
    Internet Speed
    180Mbps/12Mbps
    Browser
    Firefox & IE
    Other Info
    BD Writer LG WH14NS40, DVD RW Pioneer DVR-218L

Kebero

New Member
Member
I'll try to clarify my earlier comments, re: sound.

1)Hyper-V does not create virtual audio hardware.

2)Connecting to a child OS using the Hyper-V console will not provide you with sound.

3)Using the Remote Desktop Connection will give you the option, as it always has in Windows to play sound on the local PC. In other words, sound events will trigger the use of local, physical resources.

If the parent and child systems are on the same network (i.e. internal network), you can connect to the child system via remote desktop, just as you would any system on the same network. Naturally, you will have to enable remote desktop on the child system.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows Server 2012 Standard w/Hyper-V
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP ProBook 4430s
    CPU
    Intel Core i3-2310M
    Memory
    16GB DDR3
    Hard Drives
    80GB Intel 320 SSD
    500GB Samsung Momentus

Kebero

New Member
Member
I am using two monitors each having 1600x1200 and 2550x1440, but maximus resolution for the guest OS of WXP I can set is 1600x1200. Is this the limitation of XP?

I actually believe it's a limitation of Hyper-V.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows Server 2012 Standard w/Hyper-V
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP ProBook 4430s
    CPU
    Intel Core i3-2310M
    Memory
    16GB DDR3
    Hard Drives
    80GB Intel 320 SSD
    500GB Samsung Momentus

churin

Member
Member
I'll try to clarify my earlier comments, re: sound.

1)Hyper-V does not create virtual audio hardware.

2)Connecting to a child OS using the Hyper-V console will not provide you with sound.

3)Using the Remote Desktop Connection will give you the option, as it always has in Windows to play sound on the local PC. In other words, sound events will trigger the use of local, physical resources.

If the parent and child systems are on the same network (i.e. internal network), you can connect to the child system via remote desktop, just as you would any system on the same network. Naturally, you will have to enable remote desktop on the child system.
Thanks for your reply. I am having difficulty accessing from the parent to the child(XP SP3) to do as suggested by the last part. I created a new thread on Virtualization under the title "Hyper-V guest XP not accessible from host or other network PC". I appreciate it if you would follow up there.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    W10 Pro/W8.1 Pro/ W7 Ult
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    AMD FX 6300 x6
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte GA-970A-UD3
    Memory
    8GBx2 DDR3 1866 G.Skill F3-1866C9D-16GXM
    Graphics Card(s)
    Radeon R7 360
    Sound Card
    Asus Xonar DS
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Dell P2715Q
    Screen Resolution
    3840 x 2160
    Hard Drives
    Samsung 840Pro SSD 256GB, Samsung 850 Pro 1TBx2 RAID1
    PSU
    Corsair CX430M 500W
    Case
    Corsair 200R
    Cooling
    Zallman CNPS5X
    Internet Speed
    180Mbps/12Mbps
    Browser
    Firefox & IE
    Other Info
    BD Writer LG WH14NS40, DVD RW Pioneer DVR-218L

awiklendt

Member
Member
Great tutorial Dwarf, I would just like to add that, although a system may support virtualisation, it must first be enabled in BIOS (well, mine had to be). For my Sony Vaio, I had to hit F2 key when the system was booting (at the "VAIO" logo), Though my HP many years ago was the ESC key, I believe.

It would be good to have a follow-up tutorial on how to connect guest and host OS via remote desktop (RD). I've never setup RD on any system before and am having a not great time figuring out how to do it. It might seem a simple thing that most gurus already have setup, so they don't think to explain that part.

For instance, I was following the tutorial provided here (before I thought to look at eightforums.com):

Windows 8 “XP Mode” – Part 1: Hyper-V - 4sysops
and
Windows 8 “XP Mode” – Part 2: Windows XP - 4sysops

...and got up to "enter the network name of your VM" - but I don't know how to find the network name? Using the name I have given the virtual hard disk (WinXPproSP3) in the remote desktop connection dialogue in my host (Win8pro) gives me an error

"Remote Desktop can't find the computer "WinXPproSP3". This might mean that "WinXPproSP#" does not belong to the specified network. Verify the computer name and domain that you are trying to connect to."

I have enabled RDP in the virtual machine (WinXPproSP3) as described in part-2 link above.

Also, some sites say guest and host can RD only if they're on the same network, but no tutorial actually tells you that for setup - so how do i know what networks my guest and host OS are on? and can it be changed after-the-fact? When I check 'System properties' on both machines, they both state they are on workgroup "WORKGROUP". When I click on "Change..." at "To rename this computer or change its domain or workgroup", it has two radio buttons, one for "Domain", the other for "Workgroup". Both OSs have workgroup selected. Do i need to change them to a domain?

And lastly, I think I have to specify (don't know if this is important) that I'm using a standalone computer - no home networking setup or use of ethernet cables or anything. I mostly use my laptop commuting on the train to and from work, so I mostly use a USB modem for internt OR wifi tethering from my phone, and I've never otherwise had to play with any networking settings...

Not sure where to go from here. Any tutorials I've been able to find only focus on enabling RD on the guest OS but fail to detail how to get RD working on the host (as Win8) and even then seem to just say "and then connect them" but without specifying how....

It seems that, to get sound, RD has to be enabled first.

Any help greatly appreciated. Thanks.
Agnieszka.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 Pro 64-bit
    System Manufacturer/Model
    SONY Vaio
    CPU
    i5
    Memory
    16 Gb RAM
    Screen Resolution
    1600 x 900
    Internet Speed
    dial up

Kebero

New Member
Member
What I do is to create an internal network adapter for the VM, and designate it as a 'work' location in the VM. As long as the IP addresses on the internal network adapter are the same network for host and guest, you'll be fine.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows Server 2012 Standard w/Hyper-V
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP ProBook 4430s
    CPU
    Intel Core i3-2310M
    Memory
    16GB DDR3
    Hard Drives
    80GB Intel 320 SSD
    500GB Samsung Momentus

awiklendt

Member
Member
What I do is to create an internal network adapter for the VM, and designate it as a 'work' location in the VM. As long as the IP addresses on the internal network adapter are the same network for host and guest, you'll be fine.

Hi Kebero, thanks for that i'll try it after work - if i do setup this internal network adapter (this is in HyperV network switches dialogue, yes?) is that what will then allow RDP between Hyper-V XP and local Win 8, (without stuffing up host internet)?

i don't need internet for the guest OS, just RDP to get sound working and hopefully to "integrate" programs (that is, so that i can run XP programs without running HyperV specifically - that's my current understanding of the benefit of RDP, correct me if i'm wrong!)

i must admit, a few days ago i played a little too much with settings i knew too little about without as much research as i normally do and lost all internet connectivity in both host and guest, no matter what i tried to do to restore them (i think i just made the situation worse the more i tried playing with the adapter settings - i ended up uninstalling HyperV and reinstalling it and *phew* that restored old network adapter settings and internet to host computer... time to up the ante on investment into research time on this stuff... LOL.
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 Pro 64-bit
    System Manufacturer/Model
    SONY Vaio
    CPU
    i5
    Memory
    16 Gb RAM
    Screen Resolution
    1600 x 900
    Internet Speed
    dial up

awiklendt

Member
Member
click here to read the entire tutorial

Thanks for the link. I have an external network switch setup now, however there is no detail how this helps in remote desktop setup. Giving the XP VM an external switch did not enable whatever was supposed to let RDP work between host and guest.

@Kebero, I have checked the IP address of both machines as described here
How to find IP address in windows xp
(same method seemed worked for Win8 too)

and they were different.

I decided it was safest to change the XP IP address, so found this tutorial
http://www.murdoch.edu.au/itservicedesk/docs/Changing%20IP%20Address%20in%20XP%20with%20screenshots.pdf

when i re-checked the ip address in XP, it was now the same as my Win8 machine. I also made sure the DNS server number was the same.

So i tried to connect to the XP machine via the Win8 remote desktop connection dialogue but it gives me the same error as before ("before" = when i had no network switch setup for XP in HyperV and before the same IP was set for XP as in Win8):
"Remote Desktop can't find the computer "WinXPproSP3". This might mean that "WinXPproSP3" does not belong to the specified network. Verify the computer name and domain that you are trying to connect to."

I get this error whether i try to connect to my XP VM with Hyper-V on and the VM on and connected, Hyper-V on by VM off, or even with Hyper-V closed.

Does anyone have any other suggestions?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 Pro 64-bit
    System Manufacturer/Model
    SONY Vaio
    CPU
    i5
    Memory
    16 Gb RAM
    Screen Resolution
    1600 x 900
    Internet Speed
    dial up

area 66

Banned
Install a second network card and make it external in the Virtual Switch Manager, Hyper-V is mainly a servers hypervisor, we always use external ( bridged) dedicated nic to the VM
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 enterprise x64
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Pc-Quebec / Area 66
    CPU
    i7-3960X Extreme Edition
    Motherboard
    Rampage IV Extreme
    Memory
    Gskill 4x4 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    4 x HD 7970
    Sound Card
    onboard
    Screen Resolution
    2560*1600
    Hard Drives
    C:\Intel series 520 SSD , 250 GB
    D:\ WD 750 black with Intel 40gb SSD cache Intel RST
    E:\ WD 2TB Black
    PSU
    Corsair AX 1200
    Case
    TT Mozart TX
    Cooling
    Water Cooled
    Keyboard
    Logitech G-15
    Other Info
    Windows 8 VM is install on his own SSD.

awiklendt

Member
Member
Install a second network card and make it external in the Virtual Switch Manager, Hyper-V is mainly a servers hypervisor, we always use external ( bridged) dedicated nic to the VM
Hi, thanks for replying.

Do you mean a second physical network card in my host machine? I'm afraid it's a laptop...
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 Pro 64-bit
    System Manufacturer/Model
    SONY Vaio
    CPU
    i5
    Memory
    16 Gb RAM
    Screen Resolution
    1600 x 900
    Internet Speed
    dial up

area 66

Banned

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 enterprise x64
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Pc-Quebec / Area 66
    CPU
    i7-3960X Extreme Edition
    Motherboard
    Rampage IV Extreme
    Memory
    Gskill 4x4 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    4 x HD 7970
    Sound Card
    onboard
    Screen Resolution
    2560*1600
    Hard Drives
    C:\Intel series 520 SSD , 250 GB
    D:\ WD 750 black with Intel 40gb SSD cache Intel RST
    E:\ WD 2TB Black
    PSU
    Corsair AX 1200
    Case
    TT Mozart TX
    Cooling
    Water Cooled
    Keyboard
    Logitech G-15
    Other Info
    Windows 8 VM is install on his own SSD.

awiklendt

Member
Member
your laptop must have a wi-fi and a ethernet ( cable ) one ? , if not you can purchase a usb ethernet

the linksys and d-link are less than $ 30

Newegg.com - Computer Hardware, Networking, Wired Networking, Network Interface Cards, USB

I think I have to specify (don't know if this is important) that I'm using a standalone computer - no home networking setup or use of ethernet cables or anything. I mostly use my laptop commuting on the train to and from work, so I mostly use a USB modem for internt OR wifi tethering from my phone, and I've never otherwise had to play with any networking settings...

Hi area 66, I have an ethernet port but do not use it. At the same time, I have already setup the external switch in Hyper-V using the ethernet adapter, are you suggesting to setup a _second_ switch with the _same_ adapter? (you can tell i'm a real networking noob, if you hadn't earlier!)

Just to re-iterate, i'm not after internet connection on the guest OS, just RDP so i can get sound going.

Alternatively, will it be easier to setup my XP using VirtualBox, or will i have the same networking issues/learning-curve there? in VirtualBox, I would have to investigate whether i even need RDP to get sound, i might not, if memory serves from my brief googling.

Tell you what, gimme a week or so to play with VirtualBox - I'm not hell-bent on using Hyper-V, i just wanted to utilise the native components available in Win8, but ho-hum free and open-source it can be also.

Ta,
Agnieszka.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 Pro 64-bit
    System Manufacturer/Model
    SONY Vaio
    CPU
    i5
    Memory
    16 Gb RAM
    Screen Resolution
    1600 x 900
    Internet Speed
    dial up

area 66

Banned
Yes it will be more easy with Virtualbox of Vmware player as they have built-in sound, in your case it's what you need
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 enterprise x64
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Pc-Quebec / Area 66
    CPU
    i7-3960X Extreme Edition
    Motherboard
    Rampage IV Extreme
    Memory
    Gskill 4x4 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    4 x HD 7970
    Sound Card
    onboard
    Screen Resolution
    2560*1600
    Hard Drives
    C:\Intel series 520 SSD , 250 GB
    D:\ WD 750 black with Intel 40gb SSD cache Intel RST
    E:\ WD 2TB Black
    PSU
    Corsair AX 1200
    Case
    TT Mozart TX
    Cooling
    Water Cooled
    Keyboard
    Logitech G-15
    Other Info
    Windows 8 VM is install on his own SSD.

awiklendt

Member
Member
OK, preliminary report:

Hyper-V: no sound
VirtualBox: sound (yay!) but very poor graphics adapter
VMware + VMTools: out-of-the-box sound and graphics adapter with pixel shading (v1.4, but still...).

so far, VMware takes the cake. will make a progress report when I've tested what I wanted XP for in the first place...!
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 Pro 64-bit
    System Manufacturer/Model
    SONY Vaio
    CPU
    i5
    Memory
    16 Gb RAM
    Screen Resolution
    1600 x 900
    Internet Speed
    dial up

area 66

Banned
For me it's Hyper-v every where I can, and Vmware Workstation where I can't use Hyper-V, the reason is that I can move my VM from a server to a desktop, so I have uniformity. You can also move VM with Vmware, but my servers have only Hyper-V as option. That's probably a reason that will make me install Windows 8 in more PC
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 enterprise x64
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Pc-Quebec / Area 66
    CPU
    i7-3960X Extreme Edition
    Motherboard
    Rampage IV Extreme
    Memory
    Gskill 4x4 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    4 x HD 7970
    Sound Card
    onboard
    Screen Resolution
    2560*1600
    Hard Drives
    C:\Intel series 520 SSD , 250 GB
    D:\ WD 750 black with Intel 40gb SSD cache Intel RST
    E:\ WD 2TB Black
    PSU
    Corsair AX 1200
    Case
    TT Mozart TX
    Cooling
    Water Cooled
    Keyboard
    Logitech G-15
    Other Info
    Windows 8 VM is install on his own SSD.

Kebero

New Member
Member
I think a few people here don't understand the purposes of Hyper-V and VMware Workstation.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows Server 2012 Standard w/Hyper-V
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP ProBook 4430s
    CPU
    Intel Core i3-2310M
    Memory
    16GB DDR3
    Hard Drives
    80GB Intel 320 SSD
    500GB Samsung Momentus

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