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Hybrid SSD vs Hybrid HDD,which better?


Posts
29
#1
Planning to buy new PC with new 2016 tech,wondering which SSHD is better. (gaming)
According to Wikipedia there are 2 types of Hybrid drives,a dis/advantages chart of sorts would be nice.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_drive#Types
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Enterprise 64bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    i3-4150 3.5GHz 3MB
    Motherboard
    H81M-E34 HDMI USB 3.0
    Memory
    ADATA 8GB DDR3 1.6Ghz
    Graphics Card(s)
    R7 250 1.2Ghz 1GB GDDR5
    Sound Card
    ETION Headphones - Realtek & AMD HD
    Monitor(s) Displays
    BenQ G2020HDA
    Screen Resolution
    1600x900 60Hz
    Hard Drives
    1TB SATA3 7200RPM 64MB
    PSU
    FSP500-60HCN 500W APFC FAN 12CM
    Cooling
    ARCTIC Cooling Alpine 11 GT Rev.2
    Keyboard
    GR-152
    Mouse
    G9-730FX
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Clintlgm

Active Member
Pro User
Lacombe, Louisiana

Posts
894
#2
For the price of a 256 GB SSD I wouldn't worry about an Hybrid drive at all. Hybrids are an older technology actually. The prices of full SSD are now reasonable for an OS drive. And the Hybrids are no help at all for Storage drives.
Check these out https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias=aps&field-keywords=Samsung+850 These drive Read at around 450 MBS about 4 times faster than any hard drive!!
Actually now the latest Boot OS drives are the M.2 SSD PCIe NVMe these are still a little pricey and your motherboard needs to support the technology Check out these https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_...d-keywords=Samsung+950&rh=i:aps,k:Samsung+950 These drives read at around 2000 MBS about 4 times as fast as a 2.5" SSD
:D hope I have been helpful

These SSD and M.2 SSD are the one thing you can add that you will actually notice the difference. The one most significant upgrade in many years. CPU and GPU upgrade every years or so and unless you jump 10 years or so or are a heavy gamer you won't really see or feel much difference RAM is the same 16 GB or 64 GB is all the same unless your running multiple VM's
 
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My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro MC
    Computer type
    Laptop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Asus G75VW / Z97 Pro
    CPU
    Intel Core i7-3610QM / I7-4790K
    Motherboard
    Z97 Pro
    Memory
    16 GB Hyundai HTM315156CFR8C-PB PC3-12800
    Graphics Card(s)
    nVIDIA GeForce GTX 670M (GF114M)
    Sound Card
    VIA 6.0.10.1600
    Screen Resolution
    1080
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    Samsung 850 Pro 256, Samsung 850 Pro 1TB
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    30 down 3 up
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    Explorer 11
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Posts
620
#3
According to Wikipedia there are 2 types of Hybrid drives
That's not what it says. You are confused. Read your Wiki link again and note it says (my bold underline added), "There are two main technologies used for implementing hybrid drives: dual-drive hybrid systems and solid-state hybrid drives."

There is only one type of hybrid "drive". A hybrid drive is a hard drive with a SSD buffer. Standard drives use standard (and slower) DRAM memory for the buffer.

The "other" type is a hybrid "system", not hybrid "drive". A hybrid system is a computer with at least 1 SSD and 1 HD. The SSD is typically used as the boot drive and perhaps for applications too. And the HD is used as a secondary drive for mass storage for tunes, videos and perhaps to backup the boot drive.

Personally, unless on a really tight budget and time constraint (where you don't have time to beef up the budget a bit), I see no reason to build or buy a computer with hard drives anymore. As Clint notes, the prices for SSDs have come down significantly and continue to drop. While they still cost more per Gb of storage, when you factor in the longer life expectancy you should realize with SSDs, the lower energy costs running SSDs, and the lower heat generation of SSDs, that extra cost is almost, if not entirely a wash.

Then when you factor in the AMAZING performance advantages of SSDs, to me, it's a no brainer. Go all SSD. And note W10 knows how to optimize SSD performance and maintain SSDs without any extra software just fine.

I built this computer for W10 with the Samsung 256Gb 850 Pro for my boot drive, all my apps, and my data files. And a Samsung 850 EVO as a secondary drive. I have a shortcut on my desktop to a 63 page, nearly 21,000 word Word document I use for canned texts and such for forum responses. When I click that link, that document "pops" open. That is, Word is started and my document opens literally, instantly! My computer wakes and is ready to go from "hybrid sleep" (ideal for PCs!) in less than 7 seconds! It boots from a cold start and is ready to go in less than 20 seconds (and I have lots that loads at boot).

I will NEVER go back to slow, mechanical hard, legacy technology hard drives - except, maybe, in my backup server. Today's SSDs do not suffer from write limits of first generation SSDs. And the slowest SSD today can run circles around the fastest of today's hard drives (even hybrid HDs).
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    W10 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
Posts
29
#4
Well i want SSHD because SSDs have data corruption("Data rot"?) or limited read/write,and may not survive power outage which happens frequently in my house.
Unless newer SSDs don't have these disadvantages?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Enterprise 64bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    i3-4150 3.5GHz 3MB
    Motherboard
    H81M-E34 HDMI USB 3.0
    Memory
    ADATA 8GB DDR3 1.6Ghz
    Graphics Card(s)
    R7 250 1.2Ghz 1GB GDDR5
    Sound Card
    ETION Headphones - Realtek & AMD HD
    Monitor(s) Displays
    BenQ G2020HDA
    Screen Resolution
    1600x900 60Hz
    Hard Drives
    1TB SATA3 7200RPM 64MB
    PSU
    FSP500-60HCN 500W APFC FAN 12CM
    Cooling
    ARCTIC Cooling Alpine 11 GT Rev.2
    Keyboard
    GR-152
    Mouse
    G9-730FX
    Internet Speed
    100Mbps
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender

KYHI

Well-Known Member
Pro User
Posts
2,768
#5
If you have two storage bays - get a SSD for the OS drive and use the HDD for your DATA
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 3.1 > Windows 10
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Dell XPS 8700
    CPU
    I7
    Memory
    24 GB
Posts
620
#6
Unless newer SSDs don't have these disadvantages?
As I said above, "Today's SSDs do not suffer from write limits of first generation SSDs." Even with first generation SSDs, that was really only a problem for SSDs used in data centers and very busy file servers. Most home users would never reach those limits.

If you check out the Samsung 850 Pro series, note it has an amazing 10-year warranty. Try and find a hard drive that comes close to that.

Your RAM, CPU, motherboard and GPU are more likely to be damaged by power anomalies than a SSD. It is more likely the drive interface that would be damaged and that is the same whether SSD or HD. And of course, a sudden power outage can corrupt data on a disk, regardless if SSD or HD too. It's not really power "outages" you need to worry about, it is destructive power anomalies, surges and spikes, dips (opposite of spikes) and sags (opposite of surges), and long duration sags (brownouts).

And you should have a quality PSU from a reputable maker too. Yours does not measure up. A quality PSU provides quality regulation and ripple suppression. Cheap PSUs do not. Would you buy a new Porsche and fill up with generic fuel from the corner Tobacco and Bait shop? I wouldn't.

As for your poor power, ALL computers should be on a "good" UPS with AVR anyway. Surge and spike protectors are little more than fancy and expensive extension cords. For abnormal high voltage events (surges and spikes), they chop off the tops (clamp) the waveforms leaving a lousy (dirty) mess for the PSU and motherboard regulator circuits to deal with (if they can). For extreme abnormal high voltage events, a surge and spike protector simply kills power - never good for computers.

For abnormal low voltage events, a surge and spike protector does nothing at all. A "good" UPS with AVR (automatic voltage regulation) compensates for all those events. And note battery backup in case of a total power outage is just the icing on the cake. I have a "good" UPS with AVR on all my computers, my home theater audio and big screen TV, and even on my garage door opener!

Note I keep saying "good" UPS with AVR. Like power supplies, there are cheap UPS that should be avoided. The better UPS will have better regulation and much faster response times. The better models also have LCD data panels that provide all sorts of neat information.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    W10 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
Posts
29
#7
I want to get OriginPC's OMNI (AIO) which doesn't have a dedicated RAID controller.
Should i use RAID 0 or RAID 1 if I'm gonna have 2 Samsung 2TB 850 Pro?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Enterprise 64bit
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    CPU
    i3-4150 3.5GHz 3MB
    Motherboard
    H81M-E34 HDMI USB 3.0
    Memory
    ADATA 8GB DDR3 1.6Ghz
    Graphics Card(s)
    R7 250 1.2Ghz 1GB GDDR5
    Sound Card
    ETION Headphones - Realtek & AMD HD
    Monitor(s) Displays
    BenQ G2020HDA
    Screen Resolution
    1600x900 60Hz
    Hard Drives
    1TB SATA3 7200RPM 64MB
    PSU
    FSP500-60HCN 500W APFC FAN 12CM
    Cooling
    ARCTIC Cooling Alpine 11 GT Rev.2
    Keyboard
    GR-152
    Mouse
    G9-730FX
    Internet Speed
    100Mbps
    Browser
    Google Chrome
    Antivirus
    Microsoft Defender
Posts
620
#8
I think you are asking about a new topic and you should start a new thread with an applicable subject title that is no longer about hybrid drives. That way, you will get the attention you need.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    W10 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop

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