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Got new network storage i am lost in set up

mickyd

Member
As the title suggests i am lost in the set up its asking me -

CreateStorage Pool​


Please select hard drives to create RAID array

What does this mean :/
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Own Build
    CPU
    AMD FX8350
    Motherboard
    ASUSTeK Computer INC. M5A78L-M PLUS/USB3 (AM3R2)
    Memory
    32.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 803MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    4095MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti (ASUStek Computer Inc)
    Sound Card
    Soundblaster Z
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Benq
    Hard Drives
    C: Sandisc Ultra II 240GB
    D: Toshiba 3=2TB
    E: WDC 1TB
    Cooling
    1 rear 1 top 2 front
    Internet Speed
    70mbs
    Browser
    firefox
    Antivirus
    MBAM, ccleaner

SCANNERMAN

New Member
Depending on who you talk to RAID is an acronym for "Redundant Array of Independant Discs" or, "Redundant Array of Inexpensive Discs". Either one will work in a pinch. There are basically two types of RAID. One involves mirroring and the other involves striping. More comprehensive types involve combinations of both with or without various sorts of caching. RAID 0 is strictly striping. In layman's terms it widens the information highway you burn onto your disk so that more data can be written faster. This allows you to put two or more discs/drives together to build a much larger disc/drive in the sense that it can have a greater capacity. Drawback: Your disc/drive fails, you lose all your data on that disc/drive. RAID 1 involves mirroring. It writes an exact duplicate of one drive to the other drive. The process takes time but it certainly can protect your data via redundancy. RAID 5 gives you a bit both and you must use a minimum of three drives. RAID 10 will give you a lot of both, that is to say both speed and redundancy and you have to use a minimum of 4 drives as well. Drawback: You need a number of discs, preferably all the same size, make, and model.

Essentially your external drive is asking you to select the discs you want to use to mirror your data it seems. My Seagate does the same thing. There should be a setting in there for opting out of that. I opted out of using this as I already have my mirrors running on an isolated Broadcom RAID array. You should not have to create a RAID array to simply back up your data although it is not an entirely bad idea.

I realize this is an over simplified explanation of RAID but it will give you the basic idea. I'm guessing that you may be using an external hard drive for back up and it is offering you the opportunity to mirror your data (or networked data) on the disc drive in your NAS. Although technically, RAID is not backup it can act as backup under certain situations involving mirroring. In such a case I still recommend backing up your back up on and independent drive. When it comes to backup more is better. Ideally you should also have a cold storage backup if you seriously value your data but that is an entirely different subject. I hope this helps.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1, Windows 7 Ultimate, Windows 10, Linux Mint and more
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS
    CPU
    AMD 3800X, Intel 6900K
    Motherboard
    X99 E-WS USB 3.1, CROSSHAIR HERO VIII
    Memory
    128 GB CORSAIR DOMINATOR, 32 GB TEAM GROUP T FORCE
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA 1070, SAPPHIRE RX 590 NITRO+
    Sound Card
    ONBOARD
    Monitor(s) Displays
    SAMSUNG 32"
    Screen Resolution
    4K
    Hard Drives
    :::GRINS::: SERIOUSLY?
    PSU
    CORSAIR 1000 W PLATINUM
    Case
    THERMAL TAKE / AZZA
    Cooling
    NOCTUA / CM
    Keyboard
    LOGITECH PRODIGY
    Mouse
    LOGITECH
    Internet Speed
    360 Kbs
    Browser
    FIREFOX
    Antivirus
    KASPERSKY
    Other Info
    PC builder. Own a dozen PCs / built hundreds. All of us have a lot to learn. Some of us stand to learn more than others and those who think they know the most generally know the least. I'm here to learn and pass on what little I know.

mickyd

Member
Depending on who you talk to RAID is an acronym for "Redundant Array of Independant Discs" or, "Redundant Array of Inexpensive Discs". Either one will work in a pinch. There are basically two types of RAID. One involves mirroring and the other involves striping. More comprehensive types involve combinations of both with or without various sorts of caching. RAID 0 is strictly striping. In layman's terms it widens the information highway you burn onto your disk so that more data can be written faster. This allows you to put two or more discs/drives together to build a much larger disc/drive in the sense that it can have a greater capacity. Drawback: Your disc/drive fails, you lose all your data on that disc/drive. RAID 1 involves mirroring. It writes an exact duplicate of one drive to the other drive. The process takes time but it certainly can protect your data via redundancy. RAID 5 gives you a bit both and you must use a minimum of three drives. RAID 10 will give you a lot of both, that is to say both speed and redundancy and you have to use a minimum of 4 drives as well. Drawback: You need a number of discs, preferably all the same size, make, and model.

Essentially your external drive is asking you to select the discs you want to use to mirror your data it seems. My Seagate does the same thing. There should be a setting in there for opting out of that. I opted out of using this as I already have my mirrors running on an isolated Broadcom RAID array. You should not have to create a RAID array to simply back up your data although it is not an entirely bad idea.

I realize this is an over simplified explanation of RAID but it will give you the basic idea. I'm guessing that you may be using an external hard drive for back up and it is offering you the opportunity to mirror your data (or networked data) on the disc drive in your NAS. Although technically, RAID is not backup it can act as backup under certain situations involving mirroring. In such a case I still recommend backing up your back up on and independent drive. When it comes to backup more is better. Ideally you should also have a cold storage backup if you seriously value your data but that is an entirely different subject. I hope this helps.
Thanks for your reply, it helped me realise where i had gone wrong - i am still getting used to this thing and figuring it out one bit at a time :oops:
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Own Build
    CPU
    AMD FX8350
    Motherboard
    ASUSTeK Computer INC. M5A78L-M PLUS/USB3 (AM3R2)
    Memory
    32.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 803MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    4095MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti (ASUStek Computer Inc)
    Sound Card
    Soundblaster Z
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Benq
    Hard Drives
    C: Sandisc Ultra II 240GB
    D: Toshiba 3=2TB
    E: WDC 1TB
    Cooling
    1 rear 1 top 2 front
    Internet Speed
    70mbs
    Browser
    firefox
    Antivirus
    MBAM, ccleaner

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