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Google unseats Microsoft as the U.S. browser powerhouse

Computerworld - Google has unseated rival Microsoft as the leading browser maker in the U.S. for the first time, Adobe said this week, citing data from its analytics platform.

The rise in Google's domestic fortunes followed Microsoft's reduction to second fiddle worldwide in May 2013.
According to the Adobe Digital Index (ADI), a measurement of browser usage based on tracking visits to the average U.S. website, Google's desktop and mobile browsers -- Chrome on both platforms, the aging Android browser on the latter only -- slipped past Microsoft's Internet Explorer (IE), which retained its premier position on the desktop but had little to show for its effort on smartphones.
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Edwin

Well-Known Member
VIP Member
Guru
Hmmm......, I'm still a Firefox die-hard though! :p
 

My Computers

System One System Two

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    Windows 7 Home Premium
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    HP Pavillion

JohnBurns

New Member
Pro User
Agree, Edwin - I use Firefox as default browser too. But, I have IE and Chrome both installed, just in case I need one of them.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
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    HP Pavillion p6230f
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    HP AMD Phenom II X4 810
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    FOXCONN ALOE
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    Seagate ST3750528AS
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    IE 11
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    Windows Defender

lehnerus2000

Power User
VIP Member
Power User
Paying the price

It looks like Mozilla is paying the price for its:
  • Lack of a specific mobile version
  • Obsession with adding "fluff" instead of fixing issues
I'm using Pale Moon (64 bit).
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Linux Mint 18.3 MATE (64 bit)
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    PC/Desktop
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    n/a
    CPU
    AMD Phenom II x6 1055T, 2.8 GHz
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    ASRock 880GMH-LE/USB3
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    8GB DDR3 1333 G-Skill Ares F3-1333C9D-8GAO (4GB x 2)
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    Realtek?
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    Samsung S23B350
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    Western Digital 1.5 TB (SATA), Western Digital 2 TB (SATA), Western Digital 3 TB (SATA)
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    Tower
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    Linux Mint 16 MATE (64 bit) replaced with Linux Mint 17 MATE (64 bit) - 2014-05-17
    Linux Mint 14 MATE (64 bit) replaced with Linux Mint 16 MATE (64 bit) - 2013-11-13
    Ubuntu 10.04 (64 bit) replaced with Linux Mint 14 MATE (64 bit) - 2013-01-14
    RAM & Graphics Card Upgraded - 2013-01-13
    Monitor Upgraded - 2012-04-20
    System Upgraded - 2011-05-21, 2010-07-14
    HDD Upgraded - 2010-08-11, 2011-08-24,

SIW2

Well-Known Member
Team Member
It is a sad time over at Mozilla.

Cory explains ....

Future versions of the open-source Firefox browser will include closed-source digital rights management (DRM) from Adobe,

Still, Mozilla has taken some admirable pains to minimise the harms from its DRM.

Mitchell Baker, the executive chairwoman of the Mozilla Foundation and Mozilla Corporation, told me that “this is not a happy day for the web” and “it’s not in line with the values that we’re trying to build. This does not match our value set.”

I understand that Apple, Microsoft and Google are for-profit entities that have demonstrated repeatedly that their profitability trumps their customers’ rights...

I fully accept that Baker and Gal have taken this decision reluctantly and unhappily...And I accept that they have gone to enormous lengths to devise a DRM with as few harms as possible.

I am devastated by this turn of events. The free and open web needs an entity like Mozilla to stand on principle, especially when the commercial internet world so manifestly stands on nothing but profits.

Firefox’s adoption of closed-source DRM breaks my heart
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    7/8/ubuntu/Linux Deepin
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop

RBS

Member
For personal use I use Google and everyone I know does to, FF is second and IE third. When they tell every one to stop using it, they would have to expect some defectors
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    windows 7 & 8

pparks1

Well-Known Member
VIP Member
Guru
I think the last time I used IE was around IE5. I only use it when "I have to". Like when I have to launch Microsoft Dynamics at work.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Self-Built in July 2009
    CPU
    Intel Q9550 2.83Ghz OC'd to 3.40Ghz
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3R rev. 1.1, F12 BIOS
    Memory
    8GB G.Skill PI DDR2-800, 4-4-4-12 timings
    Graphics Card(s)
    EVGA 1280MB Nvidia GeForce GTX570
    Sound Card
    Realtek ALC899A 8 channel onboard audio
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    23" Acer x233H
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    1920x1080
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    Intel X25-M 80GB Gen 2 SSD
    Western Digital 1TB Caviar Black, 32MB cache. WD1001FALS
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    Corsair 620HX modular
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    Antec P182
    Cooling
    stock
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    ABS M1 Mechanical
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    Logitech G9 Laser Mouse
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    15/2 cable modem
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    Windows and Linux enthusiast. Logitech G35 Headset.

Wenda

Member
Power User
I think the last time I used IE was around IE5. I only use it when "I have to". Like when I have to launch Microsoft Dynamics at work.

And I think that's a major issue with IE, which must affect its popularity.

People who tried it back when it was rubbish and switched to something else either simply
never went back cos they were happy with what they had, or think IE is still crap. The IE-
bashers on tech and social media sites haven't helped either.

Well, it isn't rubbish, and hasn't been for quite some time. And no, Fred, it's not 'dangerous' to
use, not now. I've had no IE-related issues at all with either IE9, 10 or 11. The beta version of
IE11 was crap, but it was only a beta, after all.

I switched from IE6 to Firefox, mainly for its tabbed browsing, which IE didn't have, but also
for security reasons. I stayed with FF until the Win 7 beta was released, and so tried IE again.
I was favourably impressed and have remained with it since. IE11 is as good as anything else
and better than most. None of the old IE-bashing stories apply any longer, including the claims
that it's a security nightmare.

If there is one thing I'd like to see changed, it's for IE to have a decent ad-blocker. And for Flash
to be removed so I can update it when I want to, not when MS wants to. Other than that, I'm
perfectly happy and at-home with IE.

Disclaimer: No, I'm not an IE fanboi, I also run Firefox on both laptops and the tablet, and the
Tor browser as well. I've tried Opera, Chrome and Safari, among others, but they're either too
minimalist or are incompatible with some add-ons etc.

And my first browser was Netscape Navigator... that 'dates' me a bit!! :p:p


Wenda.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 'Ultimate' RTM 64 bit (Pro/WMC).
    Computer type
    Laptop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Acer AS8951G 'Desktop Replacement'.
    CPU
    i7-2670QM@2.2/3.1Ghz.
    Motherboard
    Acer
    Memory
    8GB@1366Mhz.
    Graphics Card(s)
    GeForce GT555M 2GB DDR3
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD w/Dolby 5.1 surround.
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Built-in. Non-touch.
    Screen Resolution
    18/4" 1920x1080 full-HD.
    Hard Drives
    Toshiba 750GBx2 internal. 1x2TB, 2x640GB, 1x500GB external.
    PSU
    Stock.
    Case
    Laptop.
    Cooling
    Stock.
    Keyboard
    Full 101-key
    Mouse
    USB cordless.
    Browser
    IE11, Firefox, Tor.
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, MalwareBytes Pro.
    Other Info
    BD-ROM drive.

Hopachi

Polyhedric Stellation
VIP Member
Pro User
It looks like Mozilla is paying the price for its:
  • Lack of a specific mobile version
  • Obsession with adding "fluff" instead of fixing issues
I'm using Pale Moon (64 bit).

:ditto:
Add me to that list. When it comes to FFox-like browser, I go with Pale Moon.

For the rest I use Chromium for its 64bit custom builds as well.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 x64
    Computer type
    Laptop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy DV6 7250
    CPU
    Intel i7-3630QM
    Motherboard
    HP, Intel HM77 Express Chipset
    Memory
    16GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel HD4000 + Nvidia Geforce 630M
    Sound Card
    IDT HD Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    15.6' built-in + Samsung S22D300 + 17.3' LG Phillips
    Screen Resolution
    multiple resolutions
    Hard Drives
    Samsung SSD 250GB + Hitachi HDD 750GB
    PSU
    120W adapter
    Case
    small
    Cooling
    laptop cooling pad
    Keyboard
    Backlit built-in + big one in USB
    Mouse
    SteelSeries Sensei
    Internet Speed
    slow and steady
    Browser
    Chromium, Pale Moon, Firefox Developer Edition
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender
    Other Info
    That's basically it.

pparks1

Well-Known Member
VIP Member
Guru
People who tried it back when it was rubbish and switched to something else either simply
never went back cos they were happy with what they had, or think IE is still crap. The IE-
bashers on tech and social media sites haven't helped either.

I left mostly because it implemented features very, very late (pop up blockers, tabbed browsing, etc). It did not offer the popular add-ons that I liked. And it was a security nightmare.

I didn't come back because
#1). I use a lot of computers and the synchronized feature of Google Chrome has kept me seeing the same stuff no matter where I am
#2). I use Linux and Apple as well as Windows. I like having a consistent experience across all of these OS's. And #1 in the list, makes #2 her possible.

So, my reasons for not using it have nothing whatsoever to do with security, or how good the browser is/isn't.

I too started on the web long before IE came around. I used to use Compuserve to surf the web, and then Netscape.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Self-Built in July 2009
    CPU
    Intel Q9550 2.83Ghz OC'd to 3.40Ghz
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3R rev. 1.1, F12 BIOS
    Memory
    8GB G.Skill PI DDR2-800, 4-4-4-12 timings
    Graphics Card(s)
    EVGA 1280MB Nvidia GeForce GTX570
    Sound Card
    Realtek ALC899A 8 channel onboard audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    23" Acer x233H
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Intel X25-M 80GB Gen 2 SSD
    Western Digital 1TB Caviar Black, 32MB cache. WD1001FALS
    PSU
    Corsair 620HX modular
    Case
    Antec P182
    Cooling
    stock
    Keyboard
    ABS M1 Mechanical
    Mouse
    Logitech G9 Laser Mouse
    Internet Speed
    15/2 cable modem
    Other Info
    Windows and Linux enthusiast. Logitech G35 Headset.

RBS

Member
I think the last time I used IE was around IE5. I only use it when "I have to". Like when I have to launch Microsoft Dynamics at work.

And I think that's a major issue with IE, which must affect its popularity.

People who tried it back when it was rubbish and switched to something else either simply
never went back cos they were happy with what they had, or think IE is still crap. The IE-
bashers on tech and social media sites haven't helped either.

Well, it isn't rubbish, and hasn't been for quite some time. And no, Fred, it's not 'dangerous' to
use, not now. I've had no IE-related issues at all with either IE9, 10 or 11. The beta version of
IE11 was crap, but it was only a beta, after all.

I switched from IE6 to Firefox, mainly for its tabbed browsing, which IE didn't have, but also
for security reasons. I stayed with FF until the Win 7 beta was released, and so tried IE again.
I was favourably impressed and have remained with it since. IE11 is as good as anything else
and better than most. None of the old IE-bashing stories apply any longer, including the claims
that it's a security nightmare.

If there is one thing I'd like to see changed, it's for IE to have a decent ad-blocker. And for Flash
to be removed so I can update it when I want to, not when MS wants to. Other than that, I'm
perfectly happy and at-home with IE.

Disclaimer: No, I'm not an IE fanboi, I also run Firefox on both laptops and the tablet, and the
Tor browser as well. I've tried Opera, Chrome and Safari, among others, but they're either too
minimalist or are incompatible with some add-ons etc.

And my first browser was Netscape Navigator... that 'dates' me a bit!! :p:p


Wenda.
I will have to disagree, I still have issues with IE11, I had far less problems with IE10. However, I can connect to a problem site with Chrome or FF and no issues. they all seem about the same to me speed wise, except FF takes forever to load.

Your security statement comes on the heels of MS most recent issue, where Microsoft themselves told everyone to stop using it.

I use Chrome, I love the extensions, their apps store, and their themes. Chrome, also has it's own built-in flash, making it the most secure browser, with exception to Safari. You can edit your passwords, via settings. It also automatically synch's to the last time used, no matter where you are. Chrome is far from perfect, but exceedingly superior to IE, IMHO.

I would never return to IE, to much of a headache. I use it only when I must.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    windows 7 & 8

musiclover7

Member
Member
I have come back to ie myself this past year, though I run it side by side with Firefox. I don't like shopping etc from same browser where I log into Facebook or gmail. Next thing you know, everywhere you go you get adds for the things you once searched for. Very annoying.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro 64 Bit
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    Processor AMD Athlon(tm) II X4 635 Processor, 2800 Mhz, 4 Core(s), 4 Logical Processor(s)
    Memory
    8gb
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    Nvidia GTX 460

musiclover7

Member
Member
I had to ditch chrome because pepper flash was killing me. Every flash video stuttered like crazy. I just could not deal with it any more.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro 64 Bit
    CPU
    Processor AMD Athlon(tm) II X4 635 Processor, 2800 Mhz, 4 Core(s), 4 Logical Processor(s)
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    8gb
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    Nvidia GTX 460

pparks1

Well-Known Member
VIP Member
Guru
I had to ditch chrome because pepper flash was killing me. Every flash video stuttered like crazy. I just could not deal with it any more.

You do know that you can disable "pepper flash", and just install the adobe flash player in Chrome, right? Just install the Adobe Player and then go to Chrome://plugins and disable Pepper flash.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Self-Built in July 2009
    CPU
    Intel Q9550 2.83Ghz OC'd to 3.40Ghz
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3R rev. 1.1, F12 BIOS
    Memory
    8GB G.Skill PI DDR2-800, 4-4-4-12 timings
    Graphics Card(s)
    EVGA 1280MB Nvidia GeForce GTX570
    Sound Card
    Realtek ALC899A 8 channel onboard audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    23" Acer x233H
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Intel X25-M 80GB Gen 2 SSD
    Western Digital 1TB Caviar Black, 32MB cache. WD1001FALS
    PSU
    Corsair 620HX modular
    Case
    Antec P182
    Cooling
    stock
    Keyboard
    ABS M1 Mechanical
    Mouse
    Logitech G9 Laser Mouse
    Internet Speed
    15/2 cable modem
    Other Info
    Windows and Linux enthusiast. Logitech G35 Headset.

OldGuyGeek

New Member
Power User
Well, it isn't rubbish, and hasn't been for quite some time. And no, Fred, it's not 'dangerous' to use, not now. I've had no IE-related issues at all with either IE9, 10 or 11. The beta version of
IE11 was crap, but it was only a beta, after all.

Right there with you Wenda. IE has been getting better and better over the years but since IE10, it is now rated as the most secure browser.

On a different note, these stats were released by Adobe, counting visits, not users. Most other reports still have IE far ahead here in the U.S. Of course, some will say that's because many companies force you to have IE. But then we can argue the stats for including all the Android phones, etc, etc,

The point is, if you haven't used IE lately you're missing out on a fast, compliant and secure browser.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Self Built
    CPU
    Intel I-7 860
    Motherboard
    Asus P7B
    Memory
    8GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia 580
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer (Primary), Asus (secondary), Sony TV (third)
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    Kingston 128GB SSD Windows 8 Boot Drive
    WD Black 1 TB (2 ea)
    WD Red 3 TB
    WD Black 500GB
    Keyboard
    MS 1000
    Mouse
    MS Flip
    Internet Speed
    Verizon FIOS 35/35
    Browser
    IE 11, Google Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari
    Antivirus
    Windows 8 Defender (MS Security Essentials)

Winuser

Power User
VIP Member
Power User
I use Firefox as my default browser and IE as my secondary browser. My first on-line experience was with Prodigy on dial-up. (Yes I'm that old.). Then a local internet provider started and I purchased a copy of Netscape from Electronics Boutique. It's not that I think Firefox is better than IE, I'm just more familiar with Firefox.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP ENVY 700-074
    CPU
    Intel Core i5 4430 @ 3.00 GHz
    Motherboard
    MS-7826 (Kaili)
    Memory
    12 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia GeForce GT 740
    Sound Card
    Integrated IDT 92HD68E2 Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung S27C230B
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    240 GB Kingston SSDNow V300 Series
    PSU
    stock
    Case
    stock
    Cooling
    stock
    Keyboard
    Logitech K520
    Mouse
    Logitech M310
    Browser
    Fire Fox
    Antivirus
    Eset Smart Security 7

HerrKaLeun

Member
Member
I think much IE usage is because IT departments use it as default and only support IE. At my work for example they disabled Chrome and many of our corporate applications only work with IE (i.e. sharepoint). At home I use chrome. I was a year-long FF user, but the memory leaks, and crashes killed my patience. Even if chrome was allowed, if i have a problem and call IT the first thing they would say they only support IE.

I have no idea why one would need all the extensions and customizations. All I need in chrome is xmark to sync my bookmarks with work (wouldn't even need that if at work I had chrome). One has to remember the more extensions installed, the more potential for problems. Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7 Pro 64
    CPU
    Core i3 3.3 GHz
    Memory
    16 GB 1600 MHz
    Hard Drives
    SSD Samsung 830 128 GB

Coke Robot

New Member
Pro User
Gold Member
IE is actually better than chrome in regards to overall performance on battery operated PCs, let alone security and certain privacy concerns that IE doesn't have.

It's all the noise that says IE sucks when it really doesn't is the problem.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    ASUS
    CPU
    AMD FX 8320
    Motherboard
    Crosshair V Formula-Z
    Memory
    16 gig DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS R9 270
    Screen Resolution
    1440x900
    Hard Drives
    1 TB Seagate Barracuda (starting to hate Seagate)
    x2 3 TB Toshibas
    Windows 8.1 is installed on a SanDisk Ultra Plus 256 GB
    PSU
    OCZ 500 watt
    Case
    A current work in progres as I'll be building the physical case myself. It shall be fantastic.
    Cooling
    Arctic Cooler with 3 heatpipes
    Keyboard
    Logitech K750 wireless solar powered keyboard
    Mouse
    Microsoft Touch Mouse
    Browser
    Internet Explorer 11
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender, but I might go back on KIS 2014

HerrKaLeun

Member
Member
IE is actually better than chrome in regards to overall performance on battery operated PCs, let alone security and certain privacy concerns that IE doesn't have.

It's all the noise that says IE sucks when it really doesn't is the problem.
what does battery operation to do with performance between browsers? Are you saying when the laptop is plugged in, chrome is faster, and when on battery IE? IMHO Chrome is more responsive.
Regarding security I think they all have their flaws and today chrome has a security hole, and tomorrow IE, and the day after tomorrow FF.

My personal experience is Chrome is faster and crashes less with sites that play videos (flash, real player etc.). I'm speaking about plugged in desktop, if that matters.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7 Pro 64
    CPU
    Core i3 3.3 GHz
    Memory
    16 GB 1600 MHz
    Hard Drives
    SSD Samsung 830 128 GB
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