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Find the local group policy editor


#2
Open Run box & type in:

gpedit.msc

& click OK.

I know it's available in the Pro version.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1.1 Pro with Media Center
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Gateway
    CPU
    AMD K140 Cores 2 Threads 2 Name AMD K140 Package Socket FT1 BGA Technology 40nm
    Motherboard
    Manufacturer Gateway Model SX2110G (P0)
    Memory
    Type DDR3 Size 8192 MBytes DRAM Frequency 532.3 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI AMD Radeon HD 7310 Graphics
    Sound Card
    AMD High Definition Audio Device Realtek High Definition Audio USB Audio Device
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Name 1950W on AMD Radeon HD 7310 Graphics Current Resolution 1366x768 pixels Work Resolution 1366x76
    Screen Resolution
    Current Resolution 1366x768 pixels Work Resolution 1366x768 pixels
    Hard Drives
    AMD K140
    Cores 2
    Threads 2
    Name AMD K140
    Package Socket FT1 BGA
    Technology 40nm
    Specification AMD E1-1200 APU with Radeon HD Graphics
    Family F
    Extended Family 14
    Model 2
    Extended Model 2
    Stepping 0
    Revision ON-C0
    Instruction
    Browser
    Opera 24.0
    Antivirus
    Avast Internet Security

LMiller7

Active Member
Pro User
Posts
704
#3
Group Policy is supported on Pro and Enterprise editions of Windows, not the standard edition. If that is what you have you are out of luck. Installing the gpedit.msc file will not help as the infrastructure to support it is not there.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
Posts
41
#4
Google adding gpedit.msc on windows 8 standard
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    pro Windows 8 64-bit
    Computer type
    Laptop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Inspiron 15R
    Browser
    Chrome
    Antivirus
    AVG

cluberti

Cat herder
VIP Member
Pro User
Redmond

Posts
651
#5
Note that group policy is just applying registry values to a specific registry location in most scenarios (the Policy subkeys), so if you know the reg values, you can control your system the same way.

You can search group policy on Azure to figure out what reg entry/entries belong to specific group policies:
Group Policy Search
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 x64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Custom
    CPU
    Intel Core i7 4790K @ 4.5GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus Maximus Hero VII
    Memory
    32GB DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    Nvidia GeForce GTX970
    Sound Card
    Realtek HD Audio
    Hard Drives
    1x Samsung 250GB SSD
    4x WD RE 2TB (RAIDZ)
    PSU
    Corsair AX760i
    Case
    Fractal Design Define R4
    Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15

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