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Solved Disk 0 and Disk 1 partition merging issue


cnep

New Member
Posts
8
#1
Hi Guys

This is my first time to write on any such forum hoping to get what I want.
I have windows 8 64bit machine installed on.
the windows drive C is has 29 GB space i want to increase the space.
I want to take free space from 456 GB partition located on Disk 1 and to merge that with C drive on Disk 0.
I tried a lot but cant do this.
I am dispatching a pic of my problem herewith will really appreciate if you guys can help me.
Thanks
 

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My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 64 bit
    Computer type
    Laptop

samuria

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crewe cheshire uk

Posts
461
#2
Welcome to the forum. You can't do that your options are clone disk one to the second drive and use two as boot drive were you can have a big partition. You may be able to get away with substitute drive two to c it's not a good solution but may work or you could mount it on c
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    win 8 pro
#3
Or, consider this alternative: one cannot merge an allocated space with an unallocated space -- at least that what I found out with my Windows 7. I recommend formatting the unallocated space the same NTFS as the allocated space. Then using MiniTools Partition Wizard free, merge into C from D what you want. Restart a couple of times. Please report back on your success.

Addendum: my use of the word merge above might not have been the best word to use...see successive excellent posts by others!
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7 Pro 64bit [MS blue-disk set]
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    2 Acers & 1 Antec[?]
    CPU
    i7 in 2 Acers, i5 in desktop
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    Desktop w/Gigabyte
    Memory
    Two w/16GB, 1 w/8GB
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    flatscreens; 2 are BluRay worthy
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    Regular plus external fans
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    desktio w/PS2
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    desktop w/PS2
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    DSL middle level [160?]
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    from Netscape 0.9 to FF 36
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    well-balanced, well-configured mult-layered defense is best
    Other Info
    From MS-DOS 3.3, MS-DOS 6.22, from Windows 3.1 to WFW 3.11 to Windows 95-98SE, now to Windows 7 Pro.
    Security for now: Windows 7 Firewall, Emsisoft AM, MSE [scan-only], SpywareBlaster, Ruiware/BillP combine

KYHI

Well-Known Member
Pro User
Posts
2,709
#4
why would you want to take your OS off a SSD drive (I assume it is based on size) and put on a rotator ???
If space for large games is an issue, install to Data Drive (hdd)
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 3.1 > Windows 10
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Dell XPS 8700
    CPU
    I7
    Memory
    24 GB

LPhoeliu

New Member
Posts
46
#5
It is not possible to merge the system partition with another disk. But it is possible to enlarge C: system partition with some third party software.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    windows8

cnep

New Member
Posts
8
#6
LPhoeliu
[FONT=Segoe UI, verdana, Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif] which 3rd party software would you suggest it here.. Dont you think the Hiren boot cd will do the work??[/FONT]​
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 64 bit
    Computer type
    Laptop

cnep

New Member
Posts
8
#7
[FONT=&quot]RolandJS [/FONT][FONT=&quot]I have tried that also I formatted and created the Unallocated 460 space with NTFS system and subsequently tried to merge it with the C but no success. [/FONT][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 64 bit
    Computer type
    Laptop

cnep

New Member
Posts
8
#8
KYHI
[FONT=&quot] The problem lies with the installation of softwares on C drive I do not want to run out of the space for software installation in future that is why I want to increase it so to be on safe side. [/FONT]
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 10 64 bit
    Computer type
    Laptop

LMiller7

Active Member
Pro User
Posts
704
#9
It is possible to extend the system partition but only if there is free space on that disk. In this case there is no free space on the system disk. If the system drive becomes too small the only option is make better use of the space you have or preferably install a bigger drive.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop

KYHI

Well-Known Member
Pro User
Posts
2,709
#10
The problem lies with the installation of softwares on C drive I do not want to run out of the space for software installation in future
All programs usually install to C:\Folder (SSD)
If you change C:\Folder to D:\Folder (HDD) the program files will be placed on HDD and any required Windows OS Files will still be placed on C:\

Thus saving you a lot of space on the SSD C:\ drive by utilizing HDD D:\ for the majority of program files

Just format Disk 2 NTFS and assign drive letter D -
To Test outcome > run any Program Installer and change default drive letter from C to D
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 3.1 > Windows 10
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model Number
    Dell XPS 8700
    CPU
    I7
    Memory
    24 GB

samuria

New Member
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Pro User
crewe cheshire uk

Posts
461
#11
To assign a mount-point folder path to a drive by using the Windows interface
  • In Disk Manager, right-click the partition or volume where you want to assign the mount-point folder path, and then click Change Drive Letter and Paths.
  • Do one of the following:
    • To assign a mount-point folder path, click Add. Click Mount in the following empty NTFS folder, type the path to an empty folder on an NTFS volume, or click Browse to locate it.
    • To remove the mount-point folder path, click it and then click Remove.

[h=4]Additional considerations[/h]
  • If you are administering a local or remote computer, you can browse NTFS folders on that computer.
  • When assigning a mount-point folder path to a drive, use Event Viewer to check the system log for any Cluster service errors or warnings indicating mount point failures. These errors would be listed as ClusSvc in the Source column and Physical Disk Resource in the Category column.

To assign a mount-point folder path to a drive using a command line
  • Open a command prompt and type diskpart.
  • At the DISKPART prompt, type list volume. Make note of the volume number you want to assign the path to elsewhere.
  • At the DISKPART prompt, type select volume <volumenumber>. Select the simple volume volumenumber that you want to assign the path to.
  • At the DISKPART prompt, type assign [mount=<path>].
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    win 8 pro