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Before you Dual Boot - The truth about MS, OEM's & Linux


Dark Rider

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187
#1
My journey into hell began about two months ago when I purchased a new HP laptop computer with Windows 8 preinstalled. The machine was fast, worked great and was cheap. It has a quad core CPU, 8 gigabytes of Ram with AMD Radeon 7640G graphics that can use up to 4 gigabytes for video processing. (512 MB dedicated called discrete graphics). It played everything I threw at it on high settings with great frame rate such as the new Skyrim, Black Ops 2 and Far Cry 3. All for only 400 US dollars. I could not be happier with my purchase... Then I tried to dual boot Linux and the world came crashing down around me.

I knew nothing of UEFI then or Microsoft's requirement of OEM's to use UEFI's Secure Boot feature with Windows 8. Now, I wish I had. Unified Extensible Firmware Interface - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

UEFI, or EFI is slated to be the replacement for Bios and it's been around for about 20 years. Trouble is, it's buggy and no one wanted to use it. There is good reason why OEM's have dragged their feet for years with this technology. It's still getting the kinks worked out. See here for more: EFI and Linux: the future is here, and it's awful - Matthew Garrett - YouTube

So, I started studying this technology. I found out that what most new consumers have that come shipped with Windows 8 is a bios based system with a UEFI layer implemented, but not always. Some systems have a full UEFI with no Bios and some are UEFI based with a compatibility layer of Bios. Most of the time you wont know which type of system you are buying until it's too late as the OEM's who are Microsoft partners don't advertise this information. One things for certain, if you buy a PC with Windows 8 preinstalled you will have some type of UEFI and you will have Secure Boot enabled.

Secure Boot acts as a protection feature that is supposed to ensure your system doesn't have any malware at the time of shipping. It works by checking keys in the operating system against hard coded keys in the UEFI. As these keys are signed by Microsoft, the system will not allow any other operating system to boot assuring you have a clean copy of Windows 8.

For Non ARM based PC's Microsoft requires the user have the ability to disable Secure Boot. Once this is done, Windows 8 will boot normally although still using UEFI for it's IO to the hardware. On many machines you also have the ability to turn off UEFI and boot Windows from Legacy Bios mode.

The problem with dual booting Linux either with UEFI off or Secure Boot disabled is it's not a proven technology that works well even if you do have a distro like Fedora or Ubuntu which supports UEFI and Secure Boot. I spent weeks fighting with getting Linux Mint to work properly in UEFI with Secure Boot disabled getting advise from top professionals - people who know UEFI well enough to write software for it. If the system was installed under UEFI in the first place, you can count on having your share of trouble.

I contacted HP's tech support and went round and round trying to explain the issues to people reading scripts off a card and checking with their supervisor with every sentence because they simply lacked the ability to understand the issues. In the end, I was told HP doesn't give support for UEFI, and I should please contact Microsoft.

Which is silly because Microsoft has nothing to do with the bios/UEFI in the machine, they only require it's use. In fact, you will not find one mention about UEFI in any HP documentation - at all. Not on the website, not in the advertising, not in the user Maintenance and Service Guide.

I wanted answers. I went over the tech supports heads and spoke to someone (I wont mention her name) who is a: Case Manager for "HP AMS TCO Escalations Team" I'm not exactly sure what that team does but they are supposed to have better answers than tech support. She didn't but told me some interesting things.

One reason all PC's that come preinstalled with a Microsoft operating system is cheaper than regular laptop is that Microsoft subsidizes the cost of the hardware. This amounts to being paid off in my book. It's a legal bribe.

The case manager claims this is common knowledge and all OEM's have this same agreement with Microsoft. I asked if she could provide me a reference to this online and she said it's not anywhere online that she knows of. I'm not too surprised at this.

If you read through the Windows 8 Hardware Certification Requirements for Client and Server Systems, found here: Windows Hardware Certification Requirements for Client and Server Systems , you will read about functionality you are supposed to have, that OEM's agree to - that you may not find in your system. The case manager avows all is good because after all, Microsoft signed off on the certification for these systems HP sells - Wonder how they can do this and still have the product pass Microsoft hardware certification? They are scratching each others backs there is no other way to put it. The case manager made a point to tell me several times that because Microsoft subsidizes these systems they do not have to allow support for dual booting with a Non Microsoft system or give UEFI support or even provide any documentation on UEFI.

What's worse in my opinion is she made a point to state proudly they are very interested in Linux. They have several machines certified to work with Linux and they are even Platinum members of The Linux Foundation. It's not about the freedom to use your system as you want, it's about Money. Many people fear Microsoft doing these things knowingly to keep people from dual booting with Windows 8. I even recently defended Microsoft's rights here because I thought the author went overboard: My problem with the Free Software Foundation

After talking to this case manager, I'm not so sure I had all the facts. It certainly does look like there is something rotten in town and it's not looking good for dual boot users.

The best solution to all of this is if you have such a machine make backup copies of your Recovery Disks, uninstall the system completely, and reinstall in Legacy Bios mode. You don't really need UEFI at this stage unless you have a hard drive larger than 2.2 TB's. If you want to do a clean non OEM bundled install you may be able to obtain a Windows 8 ISO from torrent of the disks here: MSDN Subscriber Downloads ( You will still have to re-install all your drivers manually) You cannot download from this site directly if you are not a MSDN partner but if you obtain such a disk you can legally use it because the product keys and CD keys are embedded in the systems bios. This will be true for all OEM machines that come preshipped with Windows 8. The installation disk will check your keys and activate your Windows as legal on first boot. In HP's case, this also will not void the warranty, your OEM may be different.

Bottom line, if you plan to dual boot with Linux, don't buy a Windows 8 preinstalled machine or be prepared for headaches. Better yet, don't support these companies at all who have these shady business practices. Buy from a company who doesn't partner with Microsoft or build your own machine. I know for me, this HP will be the last I ever buy.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 64 bit
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP Pavillion G7-2251dx
    CPU
    AMD A-8 4500M
    Memory
    8 Gigabytes DDR3 sdram
    Graphics Card(s)
    Discrete ATI Radeon HD 7640G with 2 Gigs
    Sound Card
    IDT Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    17.3
    Screen Resolution
    1600x900
    Hard Drives
    500 gig
    Internet Speed
    3.5 mb/sec

whs

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#2
This UEFI is a scam to protect the territory. All this talk regarding security is nonsense. MS and the OEMs are feeding on each other.

The solution is to run Linux in virtual - e.g. VMware. Works great for me (Zorin) even running it from an external disk attached via USB.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Vista and Win7
    System Manufacturer/Model
    2xHP, 2xGateway, 1xDell, 1xSony
    Hard Drives
    5 SSDs and 12 HDs

theog

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#3
This UEFI is a scam to protect the territory. All this talk regarding security is nonsense. MS and the OEMs are feeding on each other.

The solution is to run Linux in virtual - e.g. VMware. Works great for me (Zorin) even running it from an external disk attached via USB.
Secure boot: technical types spreading half-baked information

Linux distributions are making slow progress on implementing measures to ensure that their images available for download are bootable on hardware that has secure boot turned on.


Secure boot is a feature of the UEFI, the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface, a replacement for the BIOS.

Microsoft has implemented this feature on hardware certified for Windows 8 in a way that requires the exchange of cryptographic keys; since the company controls the key-signing authority, anyone who wants to create a bootable medium has to necessarily obtain a key from Redmond.

Misinformation is rife about secure boot, simply because people confuse UEFI with secure boot and think that support for the former means support for the latter. Many so-called technical types are as guilty as others of spreading wrong information.

mjg59 | Secure Boot distribution support


“Microsoft's real aim is to kill the aftermarket in used computers that have Win 8 installed by not allowing you to install something other than Windows”
Microsoft could just have refused to sign UEFI bootloaders. They didn't. That doesn't really fit in with what you're claiming.

If I buy a computer with Windows 8 and Secure Boot, will I still be able to install Linux? - Super User

First of all, Secure Boot is not something that Microsoft came up with. They're the first to widely implement it, but they didn't invent it. It's part of the UEFI specification, which is basically a newer replacement for the old BIOS that you're probably used to. UEFI is basically the software that talks between the OS and the hardware. UEFI standards are created by a group called the "UEFI Forum", which is made up of computing industry representatives including Microsoft, Apple, Intel, AMD, and a handful of computer manufacturers.

Unified Extensible Firmware Interface - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The original motivation for EFI came during early development of the first Intel–HP Itanium systems in the mid-1990s

uEFI/bios firmware has been around a long time.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    ME, XP,Vista,Win7,Win8,Win8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Other Info
    Notebooks x 3

    Desktops x 5

    Towers x 4

Dark Rider

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#4
This UEFI is a scam to protect the territory. All this talk regarding security is nonsense. MS and the OEMs are feeding on each other.

The solution is to run Linux in virtual - e.g. VMware. Works great for me (Zorin) even running it from an external disk attached via USB.
Ya know, I resisted that notion for a long time. Just read my above mentioned thread where I say i defended Microsoft. I still won't say that for a fact because i don't know that - but i do know these people have to realize they make it harder on dual booters. I asked the case manager, why dont you put any info about the system having UEFI on ads even at a tiny place at the bottom, or in the documentation.. she said they do not want to make it easy for people to dual boot with Windows. She said that would cause them to lose sales. I understand it's business and both companies are out to make money but I think putting all your ducks in a row and being honest and up front about everything would be better for all. This way it just makes people find fault with them.

I wouldn't be so uptight about if she had not told me that because Microsoft gives them money they will scratch each others back but when she told me that i lost all respect for both companies.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 64 bit
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP Pavillion G7-2251dx
    CPU
    AMD A-8 4500M
    Memory
    8 Gigabytes DDR3 sdram
    Graphics Card(s)
    Discrete ATI Radeon HD 7640G with 2 Gigs
    Sound Card
    IDT Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    17.3
    Screen Resolution
    1600x900
    Hard Drives
    500 gig
    Internet Speed
    3.5 mb/sec

whs

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#5
Two years ago I bought a $1200 Sony Vaio that could not boot live Linux CDs because of the retarded BIOS. Sony admitted that this was the case but did not want to take the thing back because "It was not designed for Linux". They gave me a 6 month run around.

I wrote a letter to their CEO and 5 days later I had my money back. Now I will NEVER buy ANY Sony product again.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Vista and Win7
    System Manufacturer/Model
    2xHP, 2xGateway, 1xDell, 1xSony
    Hard Drives
    5 SSDs and 12 HDs

theog

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#6
Two years ago I bought a $1200 Sony Vaio that could not boot live Linux CDs because of the retarded BIOS. Sony admitted that this was the case but did not want to take the thing back because "It was not designed for Linux". They gave me a 6 month run around.

I wrote a letter to their CEO and 5 days later I had my money back. Now I will NEVER buy ANY Sony product again.
All about doing your homework.



My OEM test rig,Windows 8 specs:




OEM said:
OS Provided Windows 8 Pro 64-bit Edition Microsoft Office Preloaded Includes a pre-loaded image of select Microsoft Office 2010 suites. Purchase an Office 2010 Product Key Card or disc to activate preloaded software on this PC. Software Drivers & Utilities, Nero Essentials S, Microsoft Office 2010 Starter, Norton Internet Security (60 days trial), Fujitsu Recovery, Windows 7 / Windows 8 Pro Twin-Pack recovery DVD


OEM said:
Compatible operating systems

Microsoft Windows 8, Windows 7 Professional 64-bit, Windows 7 Professional 32-bit, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit, Windows 7 Home Basic (EM) 32-bit,\r\nWindows Vista, Windows XP, \r\nopenSUSE Linux
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    ME, XP,Vista,Win7,Win8,Win8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Other Info
    Notebooks x 3

    Desktops x 5

    Towers x 4

Dark Rider

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187
#7
theog Which OEM are you speaking of? Most don't post that information or bother to tell you they boot in UEFI or Secure Boot mode. Yours doesn't say this either, which can influence sales and tell people it may more difficult to dual boot with such a machine.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 64 bit
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP Pavillion G7-2251dx
    CPU
    AMD A-8 4500M
    Memory
    8 Gigabytes DDR3 sdram
    Graphics Card(s)
    Discrete ATI Radeon HD 7640G with 2 Gigs
    Sound Card
    IDT Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    17.3
    Screen Resolution
    1600x900
    Hard Drives
    500 gig
    Internet Speed
    3.5 mb/sec

theog

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#8
theog Which OEM are you speaking of? Most don't post that information or bother to tell you they boot in UEFI or Secure Boot mode. Yours doesn't say this either, which can influence sales and tell people it may more difficult to dual boot with such a machine.
It is all about doing your homework.


As you have a HP, my homework on HP.

Linux operating systems for HP Workstations

Ubuntu on HP Models | Ubuntu

HP's Love/Hate Relationship with Linux Continues | PCWorld
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    ME, XP,Vista,Win7,Win8,Win8.1
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    Other Info
    Notebooks x 3

    Desktops x 5

    Towers x 4

Dark Rider

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#9
The information you posted was not from HP concerning what systems are supported on my HP model PC. Someone looking for information for their prospective PC which comes preinstalled with Windows 8, from HP's information isn't going to come across that same info. This was my beef that HP should provide better information. I would not expect someone to try to find info on this by looking at what Linux systems HP sells, or whats compatible with Ubuntu or Stephen Vaughn's blog.

So, what was the OEM that posted the above information you posted?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8 64 bit
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP Pavillion G7-2251dx
    CPU
    AMD A-8 4500M
    Memory
    8 Gigabytes DDR3 sdram
    Graphics Card(s)
    Discrete ATI Radeon HD 7640G with 2 Gigs
    Sound Card
    IDT Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    17.3
    Screen Resolution
    1600x900
    Hard Drives
    500 gig
    Internet Speed
    3.5 mb/sec

Lee

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#10
The information you posted was not from HP concerning what systems are supported on my HP model PC. Someone looking for information for their prospective PC which comes preinstalled with Windows 8, from HP's information isn't going to come across that same info. This was my beef that HP should provide better information. I would not expect someone to try to find info on this by looking at what Linux systems HP sells, or whats compatible with Ubuntu or Stephen Vaughn's blog.

So, what was the OEM that posted the above information you posted?
The following is just a question: Why should HP (or any OEM) supply information for installing any other OS other then the one they preinstalled? If someone buys a specific brand with a preinstalled OS with the intention of installing another or different OS then it should be up to that individual to do the research. Again just a question. . .:D
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win 8, (VM win7, XP, Vista)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP Pavilion p1423w
    CPU
    Intel Core i5 3330 Ivy Bridge
    Motherboard
    Foxconn - 2ADA Ivy Brige
    Memory
    16 GB 1066MHz DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI Radeon HD 5450
    Sound Card
    HD Realteck (Onboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Mitsubishi LED TV/Montior HD, Dell 23 HD, Hanspree 25" HD
    Screen Resolution
    Mit. 1980-1080, Dell 2048-115, Hanspree 1920-10802
    Hard Drives
    1 SanDisk 240Gig SSD, 2 Samsung 512Gig SSDs
    Case
    Tower
    Cooling
    Original (Fans)
    Keyboard
    Microsoft Keyboard 2000
    Mouse
    Microsoft Optical Mouse 5000
    Internet Speed
    1.3 (350 to 1024 if lucky)
    Browser
    Firefox 19.1
    Antivirus
    MSE-Defender

whs

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#11
I disagree. The manufacturer should clearly mark the capabilities of their products. And if runs Windows only, it should say in the specs.

My $1200 Vaio could not even run a Linux live CD - and there was no mention at all in the specs. That is unacceptable. That's why I RMAd it.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Vista and Win7
    System Manufacturer/Model
    2xHP, 2xGateway, 1xDell, 1xSony
    Hard Drives
    5 SSDs and 12 HDs

fafhrd

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#12
I doubt that you can expect a Hardware manufacturer to test all available OS flavours for compatibility - they test the market that they are selling to, which mostly is Windows oriented. I also doubt even more that Linux developers can test all available PC platforms for compatibility. Occasionally there will be a total mismatch, which Wolfgang unfortunately discovered, to the loss of all three parties. I'm glad it worked out in a way the end, and sad it took so long. I doubt that Sony is that bothered, though :(

As far as HP are concerned they have a tailored blanket response for the HP Pavilion g7-2251dx Notebook PC and Linux - here:
Frequently Asked Questions About Linux (FAQs) HP Pavilion g7-2251dx Notebook PC | HP® Support


-which does not say too much but hints that Linux would be compatible, but don't quote them.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP COMPAQ Presario CQ57
    CPU
    AMD E- 300 APU with Radion HD Graphics 1.30GHz
    Motherboard
    inbuilt
    Memory
    4GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI
    Sound Card
    High Definition Audio on-board
    Monitor(s) Displays
    notebook
    Screen Resolution
    1366x768
    Hard Drives
    Seagate ST9500325AS
    Google drive 15GB
    Skydrive 25GB
    BT Cloud
    PSU
    external 20v
    Case
    Laptop
    Cooling
    pretty good
    Keyboard
    inbuilt
    Mouse
    touchpad
    Internet Speed
    BT Infinity Unlimited - 80 up 20 down =70/16 really
    Browser
    Chrome Canary usually
    Antivirus
    Windows Defender and Malwarebytes
    Other Info
    no Start menu modifications
    Upgraded with no issues to 8.0 and to 8.1

whs

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#13
Hmm, if I buy a $1200 product, I want to know what it can do. Different Linux flavors do not act different in that regard. If they test 2 or 3, they can be pretty sure that they all run. And nobody expects Android or Snow Leopard to run that easily - with Snow Leopard they would get in trouble with Apple anyhow.

Btw: Here is the whole Sony Vaio saga: Sony does not care about their customers - Windows 7 Forums
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Vista and Win7
    System Manufacturer/Model
    2xHP, 2xGateway, 1xDell, 1xSony
    Hard Drives
    5 SSDs and 12 HDs

HippsieGypsie

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13,547
#14
One reason all PC's that come preinstalled with a Microsoft operating system is cheaper than regular laptop is that Microsoft subsidizes the cost of the hardware. This amounts to being paid off in my book. It's a legal bribe.
Hi there. A few questions. In what way does MS subsidize hardware? Is this by means of discounted OS keys?

In regards to your dual boot dilemma so that I have this right. Is it that you weren't told that might not possibly be able to dual boot another OS because of UEFI that upsets you?

First thoughts, not that I've come to a conclusion yet. One buys a specific machine that a specific OS is preloaded. Isn't it in the warrantee that if one alters the machine in any way that it voids the warrantee? It would be like someone taking the engine out of a Ford and installing a Volvo engine in and then expecting Ford to continue guaranteeing it. Yes?
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    8.1 Pro X64
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Acer T690
    CPU
    Intel Pentium D Dual Core
    Motherboard
    Acer/Intel E946GZ
    Memory
    2GB (max upgrade)
    Graphics Card(s)
    Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 3000 - PCI Express x16
    Sound Card
    Integrated RealTek ALC888 high-definition audio with 7.1 channel audio support
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer AL1917W A LCD
    Screen Resolution
    1440 X 900
    Hard Drives
    350 GB Seagate Barracuda 7200.10
    Thumb drives
    PSU
    Standard 250 watt
    Case
    Desktop 7.2" (183mm) W x 17.5" (445mm) L x 14.5"
    Cooling
    Dual case fans + CPU fan
    Keyboard
    Acer Windows PS/2
    Mouse
    Wireless Microsoft Arc
    Internet Speed
    54mbp/s
    Browser
    IE11
    Antivirus
    Defender
    Other Info
    Office Pro 2013 / Nokia Lumia 1520 Windows Phone 8.1DP GDR1

phantom1bc

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Posts
7
#15
One reason all PC's that come preinstalled with a Microsoft operating system is cheaper than regular laptop is that Microsoft subsidizes the cost of the hardware. This amounts to being paid off in my book. It's a legal bribe.
Hi there. A few questions. In what way does MS subsidize hardware? Is this by means of discounted OS keys?

In regards to your dual boot dilemma so that I have this right. Is it that you weren't told that might not possibly be able to dual boot another OS because of UEFI that upsets you?

First thoughts, not that I've come to a conclusion yet. One buys a specific machine that a specific OS is preloaded. Isn't it in the warrantee that if one alters the machine in any way that it voids the warrantee? It would be like someone taking the engine out of a Ford and installing a Volvo engine in and then expecting Ford to continue guaranteeing it. Yes?

so thats like saying you couldn't replace your HD without voiding your warranty?

People purchase systems with pre-installed os because thats all that is sold in stores locally to them and the prices are usually cheap, in their eyes.

As consumers, we should all realize that pre-assembled machines have and will always have major limitations.

I for one wont purchase a system where the os is married to the hardware
 

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System One

  • OS
    8

pparks1

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#16
I agree, if the product flat out won't run something you should let people know. it's crazy to expect people to google everything and read forums and posts and such to try to ascertain whether something might work or not.

It's been extremely rare that I have ever had anything that Linux would not run on. i don't google all that often to see if something is going to work, I've more or less grown accustomed the fact that it will. I don't think people in these circumstances are to blame for "not doing their homework".
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Windows 7
    System Manufacturer/Model
    Self-Built in July 2009
    CPU
    Intel Q9550 2.83Ghz OC'd to 3.40Ghz
    Motherboard
    Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3R rev. 1.1, F12 BIOS
    Memory
    8GB G.Skill PI DDR2-800, 4-4-4-12 timings
    Graphics Card(s)
    EVGA 1280MB Nvidia GeForce GTX570
    Sound Card
    Realtek ALC899A 8 channel onboard audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    23" Acer x233H
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    Intel X25-M 80GB Gen 2 SSD
    Western Digital 1TB Caviar Black, 32MB cache. WD1001FALS
    PSU
    Corsair 620HX modular
    Case
    Antec P182
    Cooling
    stock
    Keyboard
    ABS M1 Mechanical
    Mouse
    Logitech G9 Laser Mouse
    Internet Speed
    15/2 cable modem
    Other Info
    Windows and Linux enthusiast. Logitech G35 Headset.

whs

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#17
I agree, if the product flat out won't run something you should let people know. it's crazy to expect people to google everything and read forums and posts and such to try to ascertain whether something might work or not.

It's been extremely rare that I have ever had anything that Linux would not run on. i don't google all that often to see if something is going to work, I've more or less grown accustomed the fact that it will. I don't think people in these circumstances are to blame for "not doing their homework".
Especially as they come out with a new model every week. Often you cannot even find info about a certain model because it has only been on the market for a few days. 4 weeks and it is already 'old technology' - especially for laptops. That's what a sales manager at BestBuy once told me. That's why it is the damn responsibility of the manufacturer to tell you all the limitations.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Vista and Win7
    System Manufacturer/Model
    2xHP, 2xGateway, 1xDell, 1xSony
    Hard Drives
    5 SSDs and 12 HDs

Lee

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#18
It is really funny that people really think that a Manufacture should do it their way or nothing. If you want it a specific way then buy the parts and build it so that you can use a specific OS. Do you go to Apple to buy an iMac and think that Apple should set it up to run whatever OS you want, No. But, you think that all the others should.

Virtual Machines can be your friend, and allow you to run any OS you like without to much of a problem. So, why not use one remember Virtual Box is free. Also, VMWare Play is free, and there are hundreds of virtual appliances out their in the wild.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win 8, (VM win7, XP, Vista)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP Pavilion p1423w
    CPU
    Intel Core i5 3330 Ivy Bridge
    Motherboard
    Foxconn - 2ADA Ivy Brige
    Memory
    16 GB 1066MHz DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI Radeon HD 5450
    Sound Card
    HD Realteck (Onboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Mitsubishi LED TV/Montior HD, Dell 23 HD, Hanspree 25" HD
    Screen Resolution
    Mit. 1980-1080, Dell 2048-115, Hanspree 1920-10802
    Hard Drives
    1 SanDisk 240Gig SSD, 2 Samsung 512Gig SSDs
    Case
    Tower
    Cooling
    Original (Fans)
    Keyboard
    Microsoft Keyboard 2000
    Mouse
    Microsoft Optical Mouse 5000
    Internet Speed
    1.3 (350 to 1024 if lucky)
    Browser
    Firefox 19.1
    Antivirus
    MSE-Defender

whs

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#19
Lee, How do you run a live Linux CD in a virtual machine - e.g. for recovering data from a dead system.

Would you buy a car that can only drive in 3 counties.
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Vista and Win7
    System Manufacturer/Model
    2xHP, 2xGateway, 1xDell, 1xSony
    Hard Drives
    5 SSDs and 12 HDs

Lee

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1,062
#20
. . .Would you buy a car that can only drive in 3 counties. . . .:what:. . .:roflmao::roflmao::roflmao:
 

My Computer

System One

  • OS
    Win 8, (VM win7, XP, Vista)
    Computer type
    PC/Desktop
    System Manufacturer/Model
    HP Pavilion p1423w
    CPU
    Intel Core i5 3330 Ivy Bridge
    Motherboard
    Foxconn - 2ADA Ivy Brige
    Memory
    16 GB 1066MHz DDR3
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI Radeon HD 5450
    Sound Card
    HD Realteck (Onboard)
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Mitsubishi LED TV/Montior HD, Dell 23 HD, Hanspree 25" HD
    Screen Resolution
    Mit. 1980-1080, Dell 2048-115, Hanspree 1920-10802
    Hard Drives
    1 SanDisk 240Gig SSD, 2 Samsung 512Gig SSDs
    Case
    Tower
    Cooling
    Original (Fans)
    Keyboard
    Microsoft Keyboard 2000
    Mouse
    Microsoft Optical Mouse 5000
    Internet Speed
    1.3 (350 to 1024 if lucky)
    Browser
    Firefox 19.1
    Antivirus
    MSE-Defender

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