Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


IP Routing with DynamicIP ?

  1. #11


    Central IL
    Posts : 3,468
    Linux Mint 17.2


    Yes you can. But you have to know the Outside IP for the Gateway the NAS is connected to. Along with the proper ports setup to allow outside connections through the use of the utility for that NAS. Majority of the time the problem you will run into, is that the Upload speed is going to kill trying to open or transfer large files.

    When I first got my Lenov ix2-4 NAS. My brother and I played around with the Lenovo software to see what kind of issues we would have. The software is just pure garbage. He got better speeds by setting up on his machine a remote server share connection to it.

    When you connect to a personal NAS and assigned a "Sticky" DHCP IP for the Modem/Gateway, you would use the "Broadband" IP to connect to your home network. You then are asked for the login credentials. The only time a "Sticky" IP will change, is if you swap out the modem or Gateway.

    You need to know also, that there are providers that will block certain ports to stop file sharing, or if they see a lot of traffic to a person's IP, they will only leave the ports for Web Browsing (80, 8080) and mail ports.

    You really need to decide in what option you want. Just remember that if you put all of your eggs in the same basket (ie only use the NAS at your home), if it crashes or the house burns down. You lose everything saved on that NAS. That is why a lot of us use redundant copies of the data (local, two remote clouds on different providers, copy of highly important data on a USB stick and on a DVD, kept in a fire safe or off site).

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  2. #12


    Central IL
    Posts : 3,468
    Linux Mint 17.2


    If you are going to do a NAS on your home network and use FTP. Make sure you set the port at an odd port, do not keep it at the normal port or SSH port. You can then use WinSCP and Putty. Make sure you download both from WinSCP :: Official Site :: Free SFTP and FTP client for Windows I use it when I need to connect to the Linux interface on my NAS at home.
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  3. #13


    Yes you can. But you have to know the Outside IP for the Gateway the NAS is connected to. Along with the proper ports setup to allow outside connections through the use of the utility for that NAS. Majority of the time the problem you will run into, is that the Upload speed is going to kill trying to open or transfer large files.
    The outside IP for the NAS is the IP address supplied by the NAS ? I don't plan on doing large file transfers for example;
    remote pc / smart phone < > Cloud based service <> pushing or pulling file to NAS though cloud based service

    When I first got my Lenov ix2-4 NAS. My brother and I played around with the Lenovo software to see what kind of issues we would have. The software is just pure garbage. He got better speeds by setting up on his machine a remote server share connection to it.
    Some NAS are garbage, in terms of software, some NAS have their software improved, I depends it's a case-by-case basis I suppose

    When you connect to a personal NAS and assigned a "Sticky" DHCP IP for the Modem/Gateway, you would use the "Broadband" IP to connect to your home network. You then are asked for the login credentials. The only time a "Sticky" IP will change, is if you swap out the modem or Gateway.
    What you are saying is; if my regular IP is dynamic that I use to access the net, I'll need to assign a Sticky DCHP IP for the modem / gateway ?

    You need to know also, that there are providers that will block certain ports to stop file sharing, or if they see a lot of traffic to a person's IP, they will only leave the ports for Web Browsing (80, 8080) and mail ports.
    I was informed with regards to this; I would have to speak to my ISP if this became an issue.

    If you are going to do a NAS on your home network and use FTP. Make sure you set the port at an odd port, do not keep it at the normal port or SSH port. You can then use WinSCP and Putty. Make sure you download both from WinSCP :: Official Site :: Free SFTP and FTP client for Windows I use it when I need to connect to the Linux interface on my NAS at home.
    Normal porting being the port assigned by the NAS ? You recommend changing the NAS IP, how is this done ? Why use WinSCP and Putty ?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #14


    Central IL
    Posts : 3,468
    Linux Mint 17.2


    The outside IP is provider by your ISP. The NAS would have to have a Firewall rule in the Router/Gateway, to allow outside access to the NAS behind the Router/Gateway on the LAN.

    As long as your IP is a "Sticky" DHCP IP. It will never change, unless you swap out modem or Gateway.

    WinSCP & Putty allows you to connect directly to the NAS or computer, to allow you to work at the OS leval, vs. the Gui. Along with doing FTP transfers, without using Windows FTP mode. This site gives you a lot of good info. You want the "Internet" part and then just find the subject. EZLAN.NET It is one of the best info sites for working with Networking, etc..

    As for the NAS IP. It needs to be set as a Static IP on your network. Stuff like Access Points, Camera's, Network connected printers, print servers, NAS, all need to have Static IP's. Otherwise, the router could change the IP if the IP assigned by the router to the MAC for that devices loses its Lease.

    You can if your router/gateway is capable of doing IP/MAC Binding. That is another way to tell the router that the MAC for a device will always be assigned that IP. Then you do not have to assign a static IP. Personally I find it easier to do the Static IP from the Server device.

    As for the Port Forwarding stuff. You can get information about that at Free Help Forwarding Ports

    Stuff like this is a little more advanced than most people are used to dealing with. Most people just plug the device into the Ethernet port or connect it to their Wifi and forget that they still have to change the generic password.

    Cisco has some good stuff on Networking. So does Microsoft on their Technet side, along with few others. I taught myself by just fiddling around when I had free time. Same as setting up a Linux Server or pfSense as a router.
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  5. #15


    The outside IP is provider by your ISP. The NAS would have to have a Firewall rule in the Router/Gateway, to allow outside access to the NAS behind the Router/Gateway on the LAN.
    When you say, outside IP you are referring to a static / dynamic IP ?
    How would I add a rule for the NAS in the modem, not a router

    As long as your IP is a "Sticky" DHCP IP. It will never change, unless you swap out modem or Gateway.
    My IP is dynamic, I can't get a static IP. The only way the IP changes, is, if the modem is reset, unplugged etc, or the computer is turned off, reset. A method is needed to be whereas, if the modem is reset, for example, when I'm not present, otherwise not near the NAS to manually reset it, it can reset its self and forward the IP address to the location I am, or to the cloud based service so I can resume what I'm doing, understand ?

    WinSCP & Putty allows you to connect directly to the NAS or computer, to allow you to work at the OS leval, vs. the Gui. Along with doing FTP transfers, without using Windows FTP mode. This site gives you a lot of good info. You want the "Internet" part and then just find the subject. EZLAN.NET It is one of the best info sites for working with Networking, etc..
    Until I understand the correct terms, and what to look for, it will be like running in circles Remember I want to access the NAS though a cloud based service, not an FTP. What if I'm at a computer, whereas FTP is restricted, but I can log into DropBox or Google Drive etc ?

    As for the NAS IP. It needs to be set as a Static IP on your network.
    The NAS needs to have a static IP, doesn't matter if the modem is a dynamic IP, well, not that it doesn't matter, you recommend a static IP, but if in my case, there must be a work-around ?

    Stuff like Access Points, Camera's, Network connected printers, print servers, NAS, all need to have Static IP's. Otherwise, the router could change the IP if the IP assigned by the router to the MAC for that devices loses its Lease.
    What your saying is, if the NAS doesn't have a static IP, and is based off the modem/router IP, then printers, cameras etc will have their connection broken, therefore making them unusable by other computer on the network ?


    You can if your router/gateway is capable of doing IP/MAC Binding. That is another way to tell the router that the MAC for a device will always be assigned that IP. Then you do not have to assign a static IP. Personally I find it easier to do the Static IP from the Server device.
    This sorta answers my previous question, maybe not, you tell me How can I do IP/Mac Binding so I always have a static IP, without literally having a static IP ?

    As for the Port Forwarding stuff. You can get information about that at Free Help Forwarding Ports
    Wouldn't I use IP/MAC Binding over Port Forwarding ?

    Stuff like this is a little more advanced than most people are used to dealing with. Most people just plug the device into the Ethernet port or connect it to their Wifi and forget that they still have to change the generic password.

    Cisco has some good stuff on Networking. So does Microsoft on their Technet side, along with few others. I taught myself by just fiddling around when I had free time. Same as setting up a Linux Server or pfSense as a router.
    You're right, most people won't or don't touch this stuff, as you mentioned, it is advanced. I just want to understand some of the technical lingo and what it means then the pieces will come together, why I ask the questions
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  6. #16


    Central IL
    Posts : 3,468
    Linux Mint 17.2


    Again you are over thinking everything. It is really a simple procedure. If you are going to use a website like Dropbox.com, Box.com, etc. you just need to install the software that they offer for connecting to your shares on your computer. If you are going to use a NAS. It gets a little harder, because you have to set your router ports to the IP for the NAS. So that you can connect to the NAS anywhere on the Internet with the software that the company that manufactured the NAS, can allow you to connect.

    If you wish to use FTP or SFTP to connect to the Cloud if using a Web share as a Cloud. That is where WinSCP & Putty comes into play. You really need to do a little research on what you are going to use as your "Cloud" storage space, and in what way.

    Every NAS is different. If you use something like the Lenovo ix2-4, you have to use their software to connect to it from anywhere. You still have to set a port on the Router/Gateway for the IP you assigned as a Static IP on the NAS, along with the port you decided. I use port 222 for my NAS, if I decide to enable outside access. The Lenovo software has its own set of ports that software uses.
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  7. #17


    I understand, but there are something you mentioned, particularly if you can't use a static IP, those question I had asked, if you could answer those questions it will help tendentiously.
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  8. #18


    Central IL
    Posts : 3,468
    Linux Mint 17.2


    I do not know why you keep worrying about the whole Static IP thing. That would only come into play if you want the Router/Gateway to know a device is using a particular IP, so the router/gateway does not try to assign it. If you want to reserve an IP by associating with a MAC ID. You can do that if you wish. But sometimes you run into issues that one device or the other will hic-up.
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  9. #19


    What you are saying is; the software that comes with the cloud based service should have some setup information for IP address and the NAS ?
    Again you are over thinking everything. It is really a simple procedure. If you are going to use a website like Dropbox.com, Box.com, etc. you just need to install the software that they offer for connecting to your shares on your computer. If you are going to use a NAS. It gets a little harder, because you have to set your router ports to the IP for the NAS. So that you can connect to the NAS anywhere on the Internet with the software that the company that manufactured the NAS, can allow you to connect.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #20


    Central IL
    Posts : 3,468
    Linux Mint 17.2


    No I am not stating anything for how you are interpreting what I stated. I have asked over and over what kind of method are you wanting to work with. At this point, you are on your own, because this is probably the most simple thing to decide what you want to do.

    If you are away from home and need to access files. Get a cloud account with say box.com or one of the others. The other is using Owncloud if you can find someone to allow you to have rackspace to run it on.

    Again, you are just running yourself in circles, because I have given you plenty of information.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

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IP Routing with DynamicIP ?
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