Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Can I use my Win7 SSD as a ReadyBoost Drive for Win8?

  1. #1


    Posts : 740
    Windows 8.1

    Can I use my Win7 SSD as a ReadyBoost Drive for Win8?


    I have a 60GB SSD with Windows 7 installed, and a 1TB HDD that I intend to install Windows 8 on.

    My understanding of ReadyBoost is that it creates a XGB-sized file in the root of the flash drive, without disrupting any data.

    I believe I can create an 8-16GB RB file with no problems.

    Is this correct? or is this bad juju?


    And is there a way that I can somewhat "Hide" the drive, while still having it mounted for RB?

    thanks.

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  2. #2


    Posts : 1,851
    8250 x86 + 7 SP1 x86 + Ubuntu 12.04 LTS x86


    Nah, Readyboost is only for external type of storage. Besides, you don't want to use a SSD for any type of memory management since the frequent writes will shorten its life span significantly. That's why I don't even recommend putting the pagefile on it either.
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  3. #3


    Germany/Florida
    Posts : 4,514
    Vista and Win7


    GMan is right (except for the pagefile deal). Why don't you install Win8 in a Virtual Box partition on your SSD. Runs like an application under Windows7 and you can switch seamlessly between Win7 and Win8. This is the ultimate way of operating Win8 at this stage of the game.

    I have that exact installation on my 60GB SSD. Have a look how fast it boots - this is real time: Start Win8 in vBox1.wmv - YouTube

    Btw: There is a tutorial on this forum how to install Win8 in Virtual Box. https://www.eightforums.com/tutorials...iew.html?ltr=V
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  4. #4


    Posts : 1,851
    8250 x86 + 7 SP1 x86 + Ubuntu 12.04 LTS x86


    Inclusive of the pagefile deal. It is not advisable at all ever to have a pagefile on SSD. Don't you know about how there are a finite number of writes until the drive fails?
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  5. #5


    Germany/Florida
    Posts : 4,514
    Vista and Win7


    Quote Originally Posted by GMan View Post
    Inclusive of the pagefile deal. It is not advisable at all ever to have a pagefile on SSD. Don't you know about how there are a finite number of writes until the drive fails?
    1. this 'finite number' is so large that it will last more than 10 years.

    2. With a RAM of 4GB and more (which most modern PCs have), you have a page fault maybe once per year. The ones you see in e.g. Resource Monitor are false hard faults.

    So moving the pagefile off the SSD is a complete nuisance. If you want, reduce it to 1GB or less. Some people even delete it all together.
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  6. #6


    Posts : 1,851
    8250 x86 + 7 SP1 x86 + Ubuntu 12.04 LTS x86


    Deleting the pagefile is a terrible idea since when the machine bsods, nobody can help at all since no crash dump is created. There are also rare applications that depend on it to work at all.

    Irrespective of the amount of RAM installed in a machine, there are numerous writes to the pagefile often. It just simply makes no sense to me to prematurely destroy something valuable on purpose. You wouldn't lose data because it would still be able to be read if and when the drive fails, though.

    If I had one, I'd try to make it last as long as physically possible and performance is kept to highest standard as possible over the longest amount of time. They're not lasting 10 years with a pagefile on them, that's for sure.

    If you run virtual machines, it is even further advisable not to disable the pagefile.

    Here's a little page that describes how pagefile.sys is always used irrespective of RAM amount:

    RAM, virtual memory, pagefile, and memory management in Windows

    "In modern operating systems such as Windows, applications and many system processes always reference memory by using virtual memory addresses. Virtual memory addresses are automatically translated to real (RAM) addresses by the hardware. Only core parts of the operating system kernel bypass this address translation and use real memory addresses directly.

    Virtual memory is always being used, even when the memory that is required by all running processes does not exceed the volume of RAM that is installed on the system."

    And with that, I'm not really sure how clicking a few buttons and rebooting is a complete nuisance to set something up when it takes most people weeks or months to set up a machine to their likings.
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  7. #7


    Posts : 740
    Windows 8.1


    I had decided to keep the pagefile on my system (but I have reduced the size a bit). By the time my SSD dies you will be able to get a more reliable SSD for cheaper.

    I did disable readyboost though, as it didn't make much of a difference.

    And why am I not installing this in a Virtual Machine? I'm currently trying to use Windows 8 as my main system (while keeping Windows 7 intact) so I can see what it is like. So far I found it to be useable, but it will be much better once the Metro applications improve (and I get Metro versions of specific apps, such as Chrome, Media Browser, and a basic DVD/BD playback app)
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  8. #8


    Posts : 1,851
    8250 x86 + 7 SP1 x86 + Ubuntu 12.04 LTS x86


    True, Readyboost does absolutely nothing for a system with 8GB.

    Ya, I don't understand why people bother with VMs. The only reason I could think of at all is if you were like on a job supporting multiple OSes and you needed access to all at once to help others...or similar things.

    But even then, a dude like that should have 2, 3 or more computers at his desk.

    To me, it is completely pointless to run another operating system inside one that is already working. I could see running a new OS for a day or so in it to see if you have any interest at all about it, then installing it for real if you do.
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  9. #9


    Hafnarfjörður IS
    Posts : 4,376
    Linux Centos 7, W8.1, W7, W2K3 Server W10


    HI THERE
    ON w8 I'm surprised you even NEED readyboost.

    Even without an SSD W8 seems to perform just fine (even on a small ACER netbook). I'd install at least 4GB RAM -- cheaper and IMO a lot better option.

    If your 60 GB SSD is a spare drive why not use it as a super fast "Windows to Go" installation -- very useful tool BTW.

    And @ GMAN -- you must really have a total misunderstanding of the real world if you can't understand why people bother with VM's.

    1) legacy EXPENSIVE hardware -- sometimes equipment costing several thousand dollars -- still very much in use needs an older OS --either the manufacturer no longer exists or there's no W7 / W8 driver available -- or even the applicatiuon software itself won't run on the newer OS. There's literally loads and loads of this stuff around. You can't always have a dedicated computer for this stuff either. In any case it's actually getting harder and harder to run XP or Windows 2000 natively on a modern machine !!.

    2) Many commercial servers are all Virtualized for their customers -- for example one powerful machine can be virtualized into many different "Virtual Servers" all serving different customers with different hardware configurations.##

    3) A good platform for testing applications etc before migrating it to your "running" machine

    4) "Stress testing" networks / other stuff

    5) so many other scenarios that I really don't know why I'm even bothering to reply. Just because YOU can't think of any good reason to use VM's doesn't mean that there aren't any.

    Cheers
    jimbo
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  10. #10


    Posts : 1,851
    8250 x86 + 7 SP1 x86 + Ubuntu 12.04 LTS x86


    1) legacy EXPENSIVE hardware -- sometimes equipment costing several thousand dollars -- still very much in use needs an older OS --either the manufacturer no longer exists or there's no W7 / W8 driver available -- or even the applicatiuon software itself won't run on the newer OS. There's literally loads and loads of this stuff around. You can't always have a dedicated computer for this stuff either. In any case it's actually getting harder and harder to run XP or Windows 2000 natively on a modern machine !!.

    lol just install the driver to main OS

    2) Many commercial servers are all Virtualized for their customers -- for example one powerful machine can be virtualized into many different "Virtual Servers" all serving different customers with different hardware configurations.##

    I said people, not Enterprise or organizations.

    3) A good platform for testing applications etc before migrating it to your "running" machine

    Nah, I test everything on my running machine

    4) "Stress testing" networks / other stuff

    Don't need no VM for that, that's for sure

    5) so many other scenarios that I really don't know why I'm even bothering to reply. Just because YOU can't think of any good reason to use VM's doesn't mean that there aren't any.

    Maybe you should have figured why you bothered then, first?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

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Can I use my Win7 SSD as a ReadyBoost Drive for Win8?
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