Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Re-Create or Re-Initialize Hidden Boot Partitions

  1. #1


    Posts : 23
    Windows 8.1 Professional x64

    Re-Create or Re-Initialize Hidden Boot Partitions


    I have a very peculiar issue; after using various disk imaging tools such as Macrium and Paragon, my boot partitions seem to be strangely corrupted. The effects of this corruption are:

    1) Plain-text boot menu instead of the new graphical boot menu,
    2) Long delays before the boot menu is shown,
    3) Even longer delays when doing native VHD boot, after choosing the boot entry from the menu.

    I have done a lot of testing and experimentation, and on a virgin fresh installed system from the Windows 8.1 setup ISO, these symptoms do not appear. Only after I have imaged the system using the imaging tools above, do these symptoms start appearing. Unfortunately, just copying my main Windows C: partition using the same imaging tools re-creates the same issue. So I cannot rely on these partitioning tools.

    I need a way - a set of commands - to re-create the boot partitions, re-initialize their BCD stores, etc. so that I can normally boot from my C: partition, as well as native VHD boot. Can anybody help with these?

    Needless to say, I want to avoid having to completely reinstall Windows on my C: partition, as that would be extremely time and effort prohibitive, if I only knew how to re-create and/or re-initialize just the boot partitions in question.

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #2


    I need a way - a set of commands - to re-create the boot partitions, re-initialize their BCD stores, etc.
    You can use "BCDBoot" command line utility to recreate BCD from scratch. Use of this command will vary depending on system's boot setup ( UEFI or Legacy ).

    BCDboot Command-Line Options

    You need to rename the old BCD to BCD.old or something similar before using the "BCDBoot" command.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #3


    Posts : 23
    Windows 8.1 Professional x64


    Is bcdboot everything that is needed? What about commands that set up partitions and initialize them with boot codes? What kinds of partitions do I need to create - as you can see, my layout is rather complicated (but this is simply how Windows setup itself even creates partitions nowadays). Of course, C: and D: are not interesting here, but the other two partitions (and actually if I use Paragon to view these two partitions preceding C:, there's even another third partition). My hard disk structure is GPT.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Capture.PNG  
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #4


    Posts : 1,121
    Windows 8.1 x64


    Why don't you run the command below in an administrative command prompt window and attach the resulting text file from your desktop. Someone may see a problem with your BCD store that would be easy to correct.

    bcdedit /enum all > %userprofile%\Desktop\bcdtext.txt

    Edit: The fact you only have 5% free on your C: partition might be another problem.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #5


    Posts : 23
    Windows 8.1 Professional x64


    Great idea:

    Firmware Boot Manager
    ---------------------
    identifier {fwbootmgr}
    displayorder {bootmgr}
    {dbc1da3c-daf8-11e3-bc97-806e6f6e6963}
    {97ca1407-d0c7-11e3-bc50-806e6f6e6963}
    timeout 2
    Windows Boot Manager
    --------------------
    identifier {bootmgr}
    device partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume2
    path \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi
    description Windows Boot Manager
    locale en-us
    inherit {globalsettings}
    default {current}
    resumeobject {9ed0b3f4-a076-11e3-8d51-501ac50bda7c}
    displayorder {current}
    toolsdisplayorder {memdiag}
    timeout 30
    Firmware Application (101fffff)
    -------------------------------
    identifier {97ca1407-d0c7-11e3-bc50-806e6f6e6963}
    description Windows Boot Manager
    Firmware Application (101fffff)
    -------------------------------
    identifier {dbc1da3c-daf8-11e3-bc97-806e6f6e6963}
    description UEFI: USB Drive
    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier {current}
    device partition=C:
    path \windows\system32\winload.efi
    description Windows 8.1
    locale en-us
    inherit {bootloadersettings}
    recoverysequence {9ed0b3f6-a076-11e3-8d51-501ac50bda7c}
    recoveryenabled Yes
    isolatedcontext Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice partition=C:
    systemroot \windows
    resumeobject {9ed0b3f4-a076-11e3-8d51-501ac50bda7c}
    nx OptIn
    bootmenupolicy Standard
    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier {9ed0b3f6-a076-11e3-8d51-501ac50bda7c}
    device ramdisk=[\Device\HarddiskVolume1]\Recovery\WindowsRE\Winre.wim,{9ed0b3f7-a076-11e3-8d51-501ac50bda7c}
    path \windows\system32\winload.efi
    description Windows Recovery Environment
    locale en-us
    inherit {bootloadersettings}
    displaymessage Recovery
    osdevice ramdisk=[\Device\HarddiskVolume1]\Recovery\WindowsRE\Winre.wim,{9ed0b3f7-a076-11e3-8d51-501ac50bda7c}
    systemroot \windows
    nx OptIn
    bootmenupolicy Standard
    winpe Yes
    Resume from Hibernate
    ---------------------
    identifier {9ed0b3f4-a076-11e3-8d51-501ac50bda7c}
    device partition=C:
    path \windows\system32\winresume.efi
    description Windows Resume Application
    locale en-us
    inherit {resumeloadersettings}
    recoverysequence {9ed0b3f6-a076-11e3-8d51-501ac50bda7c}
    recoveryenabled Yes
    isolatedcontext Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    filedevice partition=C:
    filepath \hiberfil.sys
    bootmenupolicy Standard
    debugoptionenabled No
    Windows Memory Tester
    ---------------------
    identifier {memdiag}
    device partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume2
    path \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\memtest.efi
    description Windows Memory Diagnostic
    locale en-us
    inherit {globalsettings}
    badmemoryaccess Yes
    EMS Settings
    ------------
    identifier {emssettings}
    bootems No
    Debugger Settings
    -----------------
    identifier {dbgsettings}
    debugtype Serial
    debugport 1
    baudrate 115200
    RAM Defects
    -----------
    identifier {badmemory}
    Global Settings
    ---------------
    identifier {globalsettings}
    inherit {dbgsettings}
    {emssettings}
    {badmemory}
    Boot Loader Settings
    --------------------
    identifier {bootloadersettings}
    inherit {globalsettings}
    {hypervisorsettings}
    Hypervisor Settings
    -------------------
    identifier {hypervisorsettings}
    hypervisordebugtype Serial
    hypervisordebugport 1
    hypervisorbaudrate 115200
    Resume Loader Settings
    ----------------------
    identifier {resumeloadersettings}
    inherit {globalsettings}
    Device options
    --------------
    identifier {9ed0b3f7-a076-11e3-8d51-501ac50bda7c}
    description Windows Recovery
    ramdisksdidevice partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume1
    ramdisksdipath \Recovery\WindowsRE\boot.sdi


    Why would the limited free space on C: be a problem?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #6


    Posts : 1,121
    Windows 8.1 x64


    I don't see anything that really jumps out at me. There are a few differences with mine, but that could be just your configuration.

    You do show a USB drive in the list of devices. Is that a flash drive you had connected, or are you using a permanent external drive. If you are using an external hard drive, sometimes those can cause problems during boot.

    The 5% free space on your C: partition, to me is too small. I have seen numbers suggesting 10% would be the minimum, but I think that is a suggestion and not a hard rule. Since you seem to have almost nothing on your data partition, you could copy that to another location and then delete the Data partition, extend the C: partition and then recreate the data partition, if you wanted.

    The partition structure you describe on your drive is a normal UEFI configuration.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #7


    Posts : 1,121
    Windows 8.1 x64


    I have been going over your BCD listing. I need you to confirm what I seem to see and compare it to your current configuration.

    If you boot into the Boot Device Menu, or the Bios and look at the bootable devices, you should see three.

    One is the Windows Boot Manager that describes your current configuration.

    One is to a USB Drive

    One is to a Windows Boot Manager that goes nowhere. Possibly this is the vhd boot you are referring to, but I have no experience with this type of configuration.

    These boot manager are normally associated with a specific hard drive. I suppose there is a slight possibility your are selecting the incorrect Windows Boot Manager, although it looks like that would give you a message and stop the boot. But the system might be trying to save you and taking the time to look for a good Boot Manager..... Just make sure you are set to boot to the Boot Manager associated with the 500 GB drive.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #8


    Posts : 23
    Windows 8.1 Professional x64


    Well, that's exactly it. As far as anyone can tell, nothing's wrong with the setup. Which is why I want to re-initialize the partitions in question. because it is not something that can be easily identified on the surface of it! Any thoughts on how I could do that?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #9


    Posts : 1,121
    Windows 8.1 x64


    You might try to make the first entry in your store look like the second one.

    Firmware Application (101fffff)
    -------------------------------
    identifier {97ca1407-d0c7-11e3-bc50-806e6f6e6963}
    description Windows Boot Manager

    Firmware Application (101fffff)
    -------------------------------
    identifier {97ca1407-d0c7-11e3-bc50-806e6f6e6963}
    device partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume2
    path \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi
    description Windows Boot Manager

    If that doesn't work, there are two commands that might reset the BCD Store, which have been mentioned.

    The first is

    BootRec /RebuildBCD

    that needs to be run from the recovery environment.

    Use Bootrec.exe in the Windows RE to troubleshoot startup issues

    The second can be run from an Administrative Command prompt. It will replace the BCD Store and perhaps cause some problems with your Recovery System registrations which may or may not be easy to repair.

    bcdboot c:\Windows

    BCDboot Command-Line Options
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #10


    Posts : 23
    Windows 8.1 Professional x64


    I don't care for the recovery system registrations.

    I'll try out the commands you provided, thank you.

    These still all pertain to the BCDstore...I suppose, there's no need to work on the partitions, at least yet?

    Last but not least, I am not familiar with the commands to get the first output you provided to look like the second one?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

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