Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Native Resolution questions

  1. #1


    Posts : 5
    Win8

    Native Resolution questions


    I was always taught that switching from the LCD monitor's native resolution guaranteed a blurry or distorted picture. My last laptop had a max resolution of 1366 x 768, and I found lowering the resolution on that machine was problematic, as predicted. However, with my new Dell, which has a native resolution of 1920 x 1080, lowering the resolution does not cause a degradation of picture quality (so long as I maintain the proper aspect ratio). I have it set to 1366 x 768 now and it looks great. I increase the resolution for some games, and none of these choices causes me problems.

    So...is the advice about native resolution something that only applies to machines that have few choices, when it wouldn't be generally advisable to lower resolution on a widescreen aspect laptop or desktop LCD? Or, to put it another way, I'm not sure I can discern why it's been shouted from the rooftops never to change the native resolution for fear of a terrible picture.

    I'm truly surprised and pleased with my new laptop's Full HD resolution flexibility.

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #2


    Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts : 6,490
    Windows 10 Education 64 Bit


    It's likely not as big a deal with high resolution displays, ones that have more pixels per inch. The key is matching the aspect ratio. Also what looks fine to you may bother someone else. There is nothing that says you can't its just usually not a good idea to do it. Most of the time when you see that advice given, its because someone is complaining that their display doesn't look right.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #3


    Posts : 5
    Win8


    Yeah, so LCDs produce the sharpest picture when used at its so-called native resolution. However, we agree that changing that resolution may not look terrible after all, despite all the warnings to the contrary, provided the the monitor has a high maximum resolution. It's funny how many web sites promise that the result will cause "fonts and images [to] be blurry and everything will generally look lower-quality and less-sharp".

    I find it's really no problem when playing video games on my laptop (max 1920x 1080). Using the max resolution makes things too small, especially text (at 1080), so I typically play using 1280 x 720. It still looks fantastic that way.

    I don't know why I find that interesting, but I do.


      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #4


    Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts : 6,490
    Windows 10 Education 64 Bit


    I still think running your LCD at its native resolution is the way to go and is a good recommendation. How it looks at another resolution really depends on the monitor and what resolution you use. If it looks fine then go for it. If you start getting headaches or eye strain you may want to rethink it.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #5


    Posts : 5
    Win8


    Right, it is easy to make it distorted if forgetting to consider aspect ratio. Also, if the max resolution is something like 1366 x 786, lowering it will probably not look good. I wonder if the difference in quality, assuming the correct aspect ratio for the screen, has anything to do with pixel density? I've read there's a big difference between pixel density and resolution, though the two are often used interchangeably, and it gets confusing.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #6


    Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts : 6,490
    Windows 10 Education 64 Bit


    The way I look at it is, the Pixel density is essentially the physical orientation of the LCD elements in the screen. You can't change that without changing the monitor. The recommended native resolution will match how many pixels the monitor has horizontally and vertically. The displayed resolution can be changed to what ever you want it to. If you change it to something where the displayed pixels don't match the physical pixels in the monitor the image gets distorted because some pixels end up being the wrong color and or the outline of the image gets ragged.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #7


    Posts : 5
    Win8


    A related question: I have a 15.6 display. The game Dragon Age gives me the following resolution choices:

    1280x720 16:9

    1280 x 600

    1280x720 16:9

    1360 x 768

    1366 x 768

    1600 x 900 16:9

    1920 x 1080 16:9

    Are all of the above resolutions the ones that likely best "match the physical pixels in the monitor" and the aspect ratio? Why do only some of them list the aspect ratio? Is there a simple mathematical way to figure out the aspect ratio that corresponds to any given resolution?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #8


    1366x768 is prob closest to your native resolution, try it and see how it looks, you can try the 1280x720 also, really comes down to what you think looks best on your monitor...
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #9


    Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts : 6,490
    Windows 10 Education 64 Bit


    Quote Originally Posted by nathal View Post
    A related question: I have a 15.6 display. The game Dragon Age gives me the following resolution choices:

    1280x720 16:9

    1280 x 600

    1280x720 16:9

    1360 x 768

    1366 x 768

    1600 x 900 16:9

    1920 x 1080 16:9

    Are all of the above resolutions the ones that likely best "match the physical pixels in the monitor" and the aspect ratio? Why do only some of them list the aspect ratio? Is there a simple mathematical way to figure out the aspect ratio that corresponds to any given resolution?
    If it is the Dell listed in your system specs its Display: 15.6 inch, 16:9, 1920x1080 pixels, glossy: yes
    So you want to use 1920x1080
    Dell Inspiron 7520 - Notebookcheck.net External Reviews
    I don't know why some list the aspect ratio and some don't.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #10


    Posts : 5
    Win8


    Yes, I know the recommended. I actually prefer use it on 1366 x 768. I guess I'm just weird. To each his own, right? I'd increase to max resolution if I were using a paint program or editing photos, but for regular web browsing it's not ideal.
    It's interesting that the video game lists resolution options that I can't switch to in the windows options. I guess that's because dedicated graphics cards have modes that the integrated graphics does not. Anyway, it's nice to have options.

    Quote Originally Posted by alphanumeric View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nathal View Post
    A related question: I have a 15.6 display. The game Dragon Age gives me the following resolution choices:

    1280x720 16:9

    1280 x 600

    1280x720 16:9

    1360 x 768

    1366 x 768

    1600 x 900 16:9

    1920 x 1080 16:9

    Are all of the above resolutions the ones that likely best "match the physical pixels in the monitor" and the aspect ratio? Why do only some of them list the aspect ratio? Is there a simple mathematical way to figure out the aspect ratio that corresponds to any given resolution?
    If it is the Dell listed in your system specs its Display: 15.6 inch, 16:9, 1920x1080 pixels, glossy: yes
    So you want to use 1920x1080
    Dell Inspiron 7520 - Notebookcheck.net External Reviews
    I don't know why some list the aspect ratio and some don't.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Native Resolution questions
Related Threads
Has anybody been successful in replacing the native Notepad in Win 8.1 Pro 64 bit without wasting an hour fighting with permissions? Any other text editor out there is definitely better than the native Notepad, and that's a given, now I am curious to see if the resourceful friends on this forum...
Read more at source: Announcing .NET Native Preview - .NET Blog - Site Home - MSDN Blogs
Anyone else experience this? I saw this occurring on my dad's computer and now it's happening on my computer at work. When I run Windows 8 in the native 1600x900 resolution of this monitor, text all over the place becomes very fuzzy. I had to drop it to 1440x900 to have smooth text. Any way...
I did a clean Windows 8 Pro install a week ago with no Windows Updates at all and I was able to set my Asus VK266H monitor to it's native resolution of 1920x1200 using VGA, then today I installed the cumulative patch released last month (KB2756872) and rebooted. The monitor resolution dropped to...
Okay guys. I'm running Windows 8 Pro at the momment and I'm about to kill myself. I have my TV connected over to my laptop through VGA. My TV's native resolution is 1366x768. I have to fn+f8 on my laptop on the boot screen every time I want to switch to my VGA output because I'm unable to do it...
multicore native settings in Performance & Maintenance
I'm just curious, does windows 8 natively have a multi-core processor enabled. Where as in windows 7 you have to enable the rest of your CPU cores.
It's high time I join you guys in the hype for Windows 8. And to kick things off, I want to share this little screeny with you: http://i54.tinypic.com/2ds0q5k.png As you can see, Microsoft is adding a new feature to natively mount and burn .iso images in Windows 8. Source
Eight Forums Android App Eight Forums IOS App Follow us on Facebook