Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


suitable for the enterprise

  1. #11


    Posts : 5,707
    Windows 8.1 Pro


    This is true. Disable app support and Store, you have a purely Desktop based OS with a couple of exceptions.

    The only learning curve that I see with that and could be overcome is simply this:
    -Tell the user to click where they have always clicked for the Start button
    -Show the user how to open the Settings charm
    -Explain how PC Settings work and how it condenses frequently used settings in one place
    -Tell the user all they need to do is type at Start to seach

    This is of course considering if the enterprise was running Windows 7 already as the Desktop wouldn't be new.

    If it wasn't:
    -Show how Taskbar pinning works
    -Show and explain jumplists
    -Then go over the new UI of Windows 8 (the four things I've mentioned)

    I think the learning curve is exaggerated if you look at from that angle.

    If the enterprise already has Windows 7 in mainstream use, and is considering ipads for mobile support or some other needed reason that the ipad works good for, a Windows 8 Tablet PC is a better option as it doesn't mean upending everything just to support a trinket device. So if the user already knows Windows 7, they just need to know how to use the metro aspect, which in itself isn't too difficult.
    -Teach the user the edge swiping gestures, top, bottom, and sides
    -Show how app snap works
    -Show how closing apps is done
    -Mention more that the Settings charm and swiping from the bottom is how app settings are changed
    -Show the other Charms, like Share and Devices

    Overall, there will be learning curve regardless. It's just how it's mitigated and how effective the training is.

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  2. #12


    Posts : 1,320
    Server 2012 / 8.0


    Ouch! You mentioned the "tablet" no, no! We are referring to heavy duty work like financial offices, lawyers offices, wall street, global systems on a massive scale, banks, ... not mobile anything. Nothing mobile. No touch. Heavily networked systems that cannot be disconnected by movement. A touch monitor could be introduced at the appropriate level, but desktop workstations only for the most part. That's the enterprise. Work only. No device movement due to hard wired networked and multi monitored environment. One has to think of 8 "in the enterprise" as an upgrade to 7 with the complete removal of frivolous and unneeded activities or distractions. Productivity is key, hardwired networking is essential. Enterprise personnel required to monitor online tickers, heavy email use, spreadsheets by the dozens, analysis applications, separately networked login systems for security and response. Like a workstation environment that requires 40 workstations that run through 3 servers and a printer server, etc... Hard core activities. No non sense. That's the high end. Or a doctors health group, that could have 20 offices linked to other sites and servers for medical records data storage. It's all about the desktop workstation as a means to an end.

    As far as training goes, the basic Windows 8 UI is not all that complicated for an intelligent person to figure out. A simple 3 or 4 page quick start guide may be enough. If a person makes it to the employ of a major enterprise, one would have to expect that they know what they are doing. It could easily become second nature to most. Technical support is always required in an office environment no matter what Operating System is used.
    Last edited by mdmd; 10 Sep 2012 at 03:58. Reason: content
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  3. #13


    Posts : 354
    Windows Server 2012 Standard w/Hyper-V


    Um, BYOD has increasingly become part of the enterprise environment, and tablets are a part of that. Regardless of this trend, I don't see why everyone is so hung up on the Win 8 UI that they forget the Desktop is still there.
    Sent from my SGH-i917 using Board Express
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  4. #14


    Newport, South Wales, UK
    Posts : 573
    Windows 10 Pro x64 x2 Windows 10 Enterprise x64, Ubuntu


    Personally I don't think the changes from the start menu / Orb to the start screen is a major deal breaker, but I think that Microsoft have made it a little too inflexible. the average business user does not run more than a few apps in their work scenario, so the flat design is not a problem but more ability to customise the interface would be useful for the enterprise.

    The ability to present the user with a custom company lock screen and then start screen, with live information that is relevant to that user, Their Shedule, Their recent messages, (eMail, announcements, Special offers in the canteen ), Their current work, plus the apps they need. The advantage is that this information is presented directly to the user without the need to click a start orb.

    I think that the ability to "brand" the start screen for a company would be welcomed by many, ( I know you can use a background but a little more would be nice, Tile colours etc.).

    It may well be as the OS develops and the third parties begin to support it these additions will come, but it would have been better that they were available from the start, Any OS developer wants to have a corporate image, Microsoft is no exception to this and thus they do not like too much customisation, but likewise the other enterprises want their own identity to be presented to their workforce
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  5. #15


    Australia
    Posts : 716
    Windows 7 Ult Reatil & Win 8 Pro OEM


    Re:
    Quote Originally Posted by mdmd
    But according to design analysis experts, the start screen, edge UI, all apps, hot corners and edge thumb nailing is more efficient and effective than an ORB system.
    Someone once asked the professor in charge of the university electronics department how to define an electronics expert. He replied:

    X stands for nothing. And spurt is what comes out of a tap under pressure.
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  6. #16


    Posts : 248
    Windows 8 RTM (Retinas taking damage...)


    Quote Originally Posted by Barman58 View Post
    Personally I don't think the changes from the start menu / Orb to the start screen is a major deal breaker, but I think that Microsoft have made it a little too inflexible. the average business user does not run more than a few apps in their work scenario, so the flat design is not a problem but more ability to customise the interface would be useful for the enterprise. The ability to present the user with a custom company lock screen and then start screen, with live information that is relevant to that user, Their Shedule, Their recent messages, (eMail, announcements, Special offers in the canteen ), Their current work, plus the apps they need. The advantage is that this information is presented directly to the user without the need to click a start orb. I think that the ability to "brand" the start screen for a company would be welcomed by many, ( I know you can use a background but a little more would be nice, Tile colours etc.). It may well be as the OS develops and the third parties begin to support it these additions will come, but it would have been better that they were available from the start, Any OS developer wants to have a corporate image, Microsoft is no exception to this and thus they do not like too much customisation, but likewise the other enterprises want their own identity to be presented to their workforce
    It's not a terribly big functional change, and the start screen is only slightly worse than the old start menu. Even so, any change costs a lot of money in enterprise IT. Even if it was a lot better(it can be argued that it's a little bit better), the fact that it's different is often a deal breaker in enterprise.
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  7. #17


    Quote Originally Posted by Mustang View Post
    Re:
    Quote Originally Posted by mdmd
    But according to design analysis experts, the start screen, edge UI, all apps, hot corners and edge thumb nailing is more efficient and effective than an ORB system.
    Someone once asked the professor in charge of the university electronics department how to define an electronics expert. He replied: X stands for nothing. And spurt is what comes out of a tap under pressure.
    Yeah, I posted the picture of such "expert" a few days ago.
    Quote Originally Posted by Barman
    start screen, with live information that is relevant to that user,
    "relevant to the user"?.... Not in Microsoft's phylosophy. But feasable. Interresting ideas.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #18


    Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts : 6,490
    Windows 10 Education 64 Bit


    Quote Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
    This is true. Disable app support and Store, you have a purely Desktop based OS with a couple of exceptions.

    The only learning curve that I see with that and could be overcome is simply this:
    -Tell the user to click where they have always clicked for the Start button
    -Show the user how to open the Settings charm
    -Explain how PC Settings work and how it condenses frequently used settings in one place
    -Tell the user all they need to do is type at Start to seach

    This is of course considering if the enterprise was running Windows 7 already as the Desktop wouldn't be new.

    If it wasn't:
    -Show how Taskbar pinning works
    -Show and explain jumplists
    -Then go over the new UI of Windows 8 (the four things I've mentioned)

    I think the learning curve is exaggerated if you look at from that angle.
    -Teach the user the edge swiping gestures, top, bottom, and sides
    -Show how app snap works
    -Show how closing apps is done
    -Mention more that the Settings charm and swiping from the bottom is how app settings are changed
    -Show the other Charms, like Share and Devices

    Overall, there will be learning curve regardless. It's just how it's mitigated and how effective the training is.
    That seems like a lot of teach and show, for something you referred to as "simply this". Sounds like a lot of formal retraining to me.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #19


    At this point, Microsoft is writing themselves out of the enterprise by releasing an OS that offers very little ROI and not very cost effective to upgrade over Win7 for large enterprise customers.

    With many enterprise customers like us doing VDI and providing Windows app delivery by sandboxing the OS. We can deploy Windows 8 apps to any OS without having to present the user with the Windows 8 GUI.

    I'm surprised the Windows 8 did not show customers how to take advantage of the hypervisor built in and now it will be up to businesses to figure out how to best utilize it.

    Metro interface will be neutered for sure.
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  10. #20


    Posts : 1,320
    Server 2012 / 8.0


    This version of Windows is not being introduced as a corporate platform but rather as a product that appeals to "the next generation." I think Microsoft has plans to expand WinRT to other sophisticated device connecting network schemes with new software under development to include mobile devices within the framework of the Windows 8 architecture.

    The future ?

    Click image for larger version


    The Operating System code is flexible enough to handle many tasks. If "the enterprise" is to "keep up" with new hardware and software, it may be "required" or "inevitable" that some businesses upgrade. It probably would not be a good ROI now because there is a lack of need to include the features of Windows 8 in the field. That does not mean that Windows 8 is not enterprise capable. The inclusion of WinRT services has caused some confusion in the marketplace. From reading online of future trends, a static Win32 environment is limiting due to the advancement in mobile technology.
    Last edited by mdmd; 11 Sep 2012 at 22:56.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

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suitable for the enterprise
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