Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


My top 2 reasons to upgrade to Windows 8--share yours

  1. #21


    Posts : 106
    Windows 8 Pro


    Coke Robot--Windows To Go would be on my list but it is only available with the Enterprise Edition, which puts out of reach of many of us.

    Crawfish--did you ever wonder how such a polished and [hopefully] secure program as TrueCrypt can exist for free for such a long time, without any prospect of ad revenue or a commercial version? Just sayin.

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #22


    Posts : 454
    Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center


    Quote Originally Posted by Cly View Post
    I tried encypting the whole drive. I got an warning that I have nonstandard partitions and encrypting the whole drive could make the system unusuable. I clicked cancel at that point. I never create partitions either so I have no idea what it's talking about.

    How do you delete the 100MB partition that Windows 7 creates?
    I follow the procedure on this Terabyte page.

    When I encrypt a partition, I always choose the partition as opposed to the drive in the Truecrypt dialog box, and remember, I only ever have a single partition, so that does the whole drive. For data drives, either before or after doing this (doesn't matter), I remove the drive letter in Windows Disk Management. After encrypting, I mount it to the desired drive letter in Truecrypt and make it a "System Favorite" volume for permanent drives and a "Favorite" volume for external and thumb drives, setting the appropriate options to mount them automatically. From then on, the fact that a drive is encrypted is totally transparent as I'm also using system encryption on all my computers. Of course, you should manually dismount an external drive and eject it before powering the drive down or thumb drive before removing it.

    EDIT:

    I just opened Computer Management. There is an 86MB partition labelled OEM Partition. Safe to delete? It's a Dell laptop.
    If you have your own OS installation media and don't care about any Dell files that may be there, I would say yes. I know I wiped my Vostro's hard drive after ensuring it started up and then I installed my own copy of Windows.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cly View Post
    Crawfish--did you ever wonder how such a polished and [hopefully] secure program as TrueCrypt can exist for free for such a long time, without any prospect of ad revenue or a commercial version? Just sayin.
    In the couple of years I've been using it, I've never run into a bug with Truecrypt. It works great with Windows 7 and will continue to do so. It doesn't do anything irreversible, and though it would be a minor PITA to stop using it, it's something I can use now. Bitlocker is a non-starter with its PIN or even worse, a USB drive. Truecrypt is used by lots of people all over the world which gives it a base for its donation requests, is open source, and is highly regarded by security experts.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #23


    Posts : 106
    Windows 8 Pro


    [QUOTE=crawfish;102907]
    Quote Originally Posted by Cly View Post
    In the couple of years I've been using it, I've never run into a bug with Truecrypt. It works great with Windows 7 and will continue to do so. It doesn't do anything irreversible, and though it would be a minor PITA to stop using it, it's something I can use now. Bitlocker is a non-starter with its PIN or even worse, a USB drive. Truecrypt is used by lots of people all over the world which gives it a base for its donation requests, is open source, and is highly regarded by security experts.
    I've been using TrueCrypt for ever. I just don't find them very transparent. How much money do they raise through donations? This is a serious programming effort that requires a deep knowledge of every aspect of several generations of all major operating systems and how they function and interact with hardware at a very low level. How many software shops can program at this level for several generations of Windows, Apple OS and Linux? Like you said, I haven't had a single crash or error in years. When they publish an update that "fixes minor bugs" I scratch my head because I've never noticed any. They did goof up the first attempt at plausible deinability, but that just shows you how difficult the task is. And writing that 150-page manual is somewhat unusual these days.

    What security experts have reviewed the source code? They say there must be someone reviewing it because they get bug reports once in a while. Hmm.

    Do you compile the source code or like most people just download the precompiled package?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #24


    Hafnarfjörður IS
    Posts : 4,376
    Linux Centos 7, W8.1, W7, W2K3 Server W10


    Quote Originally Posted by Cly View Post
    Coke Robot--Windows To Go would be on my list but it is only available with the Enterprise Edition, which puts out of reach of many of us.

    Crawfish--did you ever wonder how such a polished and [hopefully] secure program as TrueCrypt can exist for free for such a long time, without any prospect of ad revenue or a commercial version? Just sayin.
    Hi there
    Windows to go mechanism might be "Do-able" on std windows -- all it needs is the boot commands which presumably you can extract off the current Windows 8 stuff. While Windows 8 CP will expire in January 2013 --that doesn't mean that some of the individual PROGRAMS will stop functioning.

    I doubt if Ms will change the whole boot mechanism before release date --especially at this stage.

    Of course the main problem with any "Hacked" windows to go version will be the need for re-activation if you try and boot it on different hardware.

    A possible good idea until a "Hackable" version of Windows to go appears is to install any version of Windows you like as a VM on an SSD under a tiny version of Linux and connect the SSD via a SATA==>USB3 interface. This should (even with the VM overhead) still be fast enough to be useful and the VM would only ever need to be activated ONCE.

    Hacking a standard W8 system would present "Activation" problems -- but if the W8 to go was just being used as a tool then you could always re-image it as activation is normally required within 30 days. Decent imaging programs could restore a new image within 15 mins (on an SSD probably within about 7 mins !!).

    SATA==>USB3 connections aren't available yet on a lot of laptops --especially company one's who tend to go for generic models like HP == fine but aren't leading edge technology.

    A SATA==>USB2 connection works decently enough though --especially with an SSD. -- If you have an older 60GB SSD this would be a good use for it.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #25


    Orbiting the Moon
    Posts : 2,975
    Windows 10 x64


    Quote Originally Posted by Cly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
    Not sure why people are so excited about iso mounting.

    I suppose it is marginally more convenient to have it included if all you ever want to do is mount them .

    No biggie. Plenty of free isomounting software already available. If you have simple needs, then this is good WinCDEmu - the easiest way to mount an ISO. And more... ( it also creates iso's). Works great on win7.

    If you want to do more than just mounting you would need a full isohandler anyhow.

    Like this: PowerISO - Create, Burn, Mount, Edit, Compress, Encrypt, Split, Extract ISO file, ISO/BIN converter, Virtual Drive


    the free (unregistered ) version does almost everything - the only limitataion of the free version is you are restricted to editing only up to 300mb. It is also great for writing iso to flash
    There are a couple of reasons for preferring it to be built in:

    (1) Having a to look for, possibly paying for, verifying that it's secure and not some trojan, and keeping it up to date. Multiply that by every utility that could be provided by a third party and it gets tiresome pretty quickly.

    To me ISO mounting is as basic as reading the contents of a hard drive or a Zip archive. Also, recall that MS had a utility that worked only in Windows XP, but they discontinued support for it in Vista and 7.

    (2) I carry some ISOs with me that I would like to use on clients' computers sometimes. It's not convenient to also carry an ISO mounting tool AND ask the person to give you Admin privileges so that you can install it!

    It's just a very basic OS function.

    I would have liked to see ISO creation too. I am hoping that oscdimg can handle basic ISO creation.
    Indeed.

    It's something basic that should be included in the os (Ubuntu has it) and it's way better than those third party stuff (poweriso, magiciso, ...), not that it's that important but they are 32bit on a 64bit os and the built in function is 64bit as it should.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #26


    Orbiting the Moon
    Posts : 2,975
    Windows 10 x64


    Quote Originally Posted by Cly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Hopachi View Post
    Top two reasons:
    - iso support also
    - better compatibility mode + reduced color mode
    I am curious, what do you mean by "- better compatibility mode + reduced color mode"?
    This:
    Click image for larger version
    Allows to use compatibility mode that works better for some old program's need: sometimes you need 16bit color mode (65536 colors) or 8bit (256 colors) and you don't need to manually choose that from the screen resolution menu, it switches automatically when needed.

    And for some programs (tested Dune 2000 and Moto Racer 1) that worked (designed for, built on Win95/98) back in Win98, the compatibility in Win8 works better for them now.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #27


    Posts : 106
    Windows 8 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo45 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Cly View Post
    Coke Robot--Windows To Go would be on my list but it is only available with the Enterprise Edition, which puts out of reach of many of us.

    Crawfish--did you ever wonder how such a polished and [hopefully] secure program as TrueCrypt can exist for free for such a long time, without any prospect of ad revenue or a commercial version? Just sayin.
    Hi there
    Windows to go mechanism might be "Do-able" on std windows -- all it needs is the boot commands which presumably you can extract off the current Windows 8 stuff. While Windows 8 CP will expire in January 2013 --that doesn't mean that some of the individual PROGRAMS will stop functioning.

    I doubt if Ms will change the whole boot mechanism before release date --especially at this stage.

    Of course the main problem with any "Hacked" windows to go version will be the need for re-activation if you try and boot it on different hardware.

    A possible good idea until a "Hackable" version of Windows to go appears is to install any version of Windows you like as a VM on an SSD under a tiny version of Linux and connect the SSD via a SATA==>USB3 interface. This should (even with the VM overhead) still be fast enough to be useful and the VM would only ever need to be activated ONCE.

    Hacking a standard W8 system would present "Activation" problems -- but if the W8 to go was just being used as a tool then you could always re-image it as activation is normally required within 30 days. Decent imaging programs could restore a new image within 15 mins (on an SSD probably within about 7 mins !!).

    SATA==>USB3 connections aren't available yet on a lot of laptops --especially company one's who tend to go for generic models like HP == fine but aren't leading edge technology.

    A SATA==>USB2 connection works decently enough though --especially with an SSD. -- If you have an older 60GB SSD this would be a good use for it.

    Cheers
    jimbo
    I am going to install Windows 8 RP in virtualbox just to try it out. Is there an option for building a Windows To Go USB built right in?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #28


    India
    Posts : 1,184
    Windows 8.1, Windows 7, Linux Mint 14


    Hello cly,
    Before you proceed with installing windows 8 release preview in virtual box, my advice is that you drop the idea.
    Because you won't get the real experience. Virtual box had lots of unexplained crushes in my case.

    Another important thing is, the virtual box guest addition is having problems with windows 8. In my case the title bars in windows 8 desktop mode always flickered. So the point is, you won't be able to experience the real windows 8.

    My suggestion is that install windows 8 in a virtual hard disk.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #29


    Posts : 106
    Windows 8 Pro


    Quote Originally Posted by Arpan View Post
    Hello cly,
    Before you proceed with installing windows 8 release preview in virtual box, my advice is that you drop the idea.
    Because you won't get the real experience. Virtual box had lots of unexplained crushes in my case.

    Another important thing is, the virtual box guest addition is having problems with windows 8. In my case the title bars in windows 8 desktop mode always flickered. So the point is, you won't be able to experience the real windows 8.

    My suggestion is that install windows 8 in a virtual hard disk.
    What program would you use to install Win 8 in a virtual hard disk?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #30


    Orbiting the Moon
    Posts : 2,975
    Windows 10 x64


    Quote Originally Posted by Arpan View Post
    Hello cly,
    Before you proceed with installing windows 8 release preview in virtual box, my advice is that you drop the idea.
    Because you won't get the real experience. Virtual box had lots of unexplained crushes in my case.

    Another important thing is, the virtual box guest addition is having problems with windows 8. In my case the title bars in windows 8 desktop mode always flickered. So the point is, you won't be able to experience the real windows 8.

    My suggestion is that install windows 8 in a virtual hard disk.
    Use VMware Player (version 4) instead of VirtualBox and the additions (tools) work better.

    VirtualBox works, I agree that's nor the real experience, but for testing things out works pretty well.
    I have a workaround for the additions problem in VirtualBox. If you install(ed) the additions (before or after the install) go to Control Panel -> System -> Advanced System Settings and in the Advanced tab => performance settings and select this and OK:
    Click image for larger version
    By disabling animations, (transparency is not that important here) the flickering dissapears.

    Even better is to uninstall the VBox Graphics Display Adapter (roll back driver) from Device Manager and use the standard graphics display instead. Then shut the VM down and add a custom resolution that matches your real monitor resolution: example for 1080p resolution: <ExtraDataItem name="CustomVideoMode1" value="1920x1080x32"/>
    See this thread for details (2nd post): VM Trouble (2)

    That's all
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

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My top 2 reasons to upgrade to Windows 8--share yours
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