Quote Originally Posted by crawfish View Post
Well, once the program is running, there's nothing else it should do; the taskbar is a window switcher for running programs. If you want to open a second IE window that way, right-click the pinned icon and click on the icon in the menu. Before you moan about how difficult this is, consider that 99% of the time, you should be using tabs anyway. If you're talking about Windows Explorer, you could also use Win+E to get a second window.
Right clicking, keyboard shortcuts, etc.. all require more clicks/effort than simply single-clicking a QuickLaunch icon. Tabs in IE? Sure, but I'm on a multi monitor system and I like having multiple windows open. Occasionally I have to run IE64 in one window and IE32 bit in another because Flash likes to kill all open windows. Again, QuickLaunch works the way *I* want it to, pinned icons don't.
Quote Originally Posted by crawfish View Post
Do you hate all things that are awesome? Besides providing a Recent Files feature on the taskbar, you can pin documents to jumplists, which is a sort of mini-Favorites feature. Pinning documents to jumplists lets me open them directly from the taskbar without having to navigate to them in Explorer or open the program and search through its Recent Files or use File/Open. I use this all the time with Excel, Notepad++, and PDF-XChange Viewer. Other programs like Outlook and iTunes provide program commands in their jumplist. In 2009, Microsoft finally caught on to the 1980s idea of RiscOS by making icons on the taskbar have a menu and actually do stuff, besides just helping people find open windows.
Nope, I don't hate all things that are awesome, but we clearly have different opinions of what makes something awesome. I don't need documents in jumplists as I'm rarely working on the same document/file more than once. Again, I simply have no need for those features and I've turned them off since they're more of a nuisance than a benefit.

Quote Originally Posted by crawfish View Post
To each his own, I guess. Prior to Windows 7, I disabled Quick Launch because I was using another program launcher which was far more capable. I'll never understand how anyone who uses more than a handful of programs has ever been able to stand using Windows with the Start Menu, desktop, and later, the Quick Launch bar.
Yep, to each his own.