Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Future For Windows 8.1

  1. #21


    Just hoping MS cater for both when we get the fnal version
    That is the plan but no doubt there will be good and bad things with both.

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  2. #22


    UK
    Posts : 283
    Windows 8.1


    very true


    Off to have a look at some more of Win 10 now

    Enjoy your weekend
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  3. #23


    You too.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #24


    Central IL
    Posts : 3,468
    Linux Mint 17.2


    Quote Originally Posted by Itaregid View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by broe23
    You just really need to install Classic Shell or Start8 and utilize the standard desktop. As for from Metro Screen, the search function still works the same as it does in desktop.
    Ummm, no. Classic Shell and Start8 (which I use) have nothing to do with W8's integrated search feature.
    You do realize that was two different statements. It is obvious that you assumed too much that both sentences were talking about the same thing.
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  5. #25


    Los Angeles
    Posts : 3
    Windows 8.1


    Quote Originally Posted by asvent View Post
    Plus, you show me a Windows 8 user who complains about the missing start menu and I'll show you a Windows 8 user who likely doesn't know about the search charm and how it blows the start menu completely out of the water.
    That doesn't work effectively in an Enterprise environment. In addition to standard MSOffice we also work with a great deal of customized software developed for a global user-base. The large program infrastructure makes it infeasible to remember the program names to enable a search. That and the program titles don't follow US English norms given that they were developed overseas.

    Having these programs nearly compacted into the Start Menu makes life so much easier, particularly when training new employees with no prior exposure to this software. It just eliminates the need to hunt all over the massive Start Screen to locate and sequentially open programs when this can be more efficiently accomplished as a process-driven tasks.

    For these employees there would be no time or cost savings achieved by attempting to use the Start Screen, only lost productivity.
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  6. #26


    You do realize that was two different statements.
    No I didn't, and sorry - but why would I? You quoted towget's comment (and only his comment) about Windows 8.1 searching issues. His comment mentioned nothing about Metro or desktops, only W8.1. You then put your two sentences together in one paragraph - which by definition is one or more closely related sentences that form one main idea. As noted here, the "only" requirement for a paragraph is that,
    it expresses only one idea, thought or topic.
    It is obvious that you assumed too much that both sentences were talking about the same thing.
    Yes I did assume too much though it is obvious you assume everyone can read your mind, follow improper grammar structure, and understand your replies may jam together in one paragraph different subjects - even when quoting just one.

    So my apologies for only having 5 senses and misunderstanding what you were trying to say.

    Quote Originally Posted by LAX
    That doesn't work effectively in an Enterprise environment.
    I agree. And it doesn't always work in home or small office environments either. There is no reason the Start Menu search could not be made to provide the same results as the Charm. This was just another attempt by MS to force the new UI on us.

    particularly when training new employees with no prior exposure to this software
    Not just newbies, but experienced users set in their ways, perhaps with no desire to learn a new procedure - especially if they don't have a trainer around to show them. And frankly, I think that is another misstep by Microsoft. While true, the corporate/enterprise/business universe holds the majority of Windows based computers, there typically are IT people, or more experienced users on site to get help from. That often is not the case with home users. Especially home users [more or less] forced to upgrade to a new computer and modern OS because their old computer broke, or because XP needed to go away for security.

    People naturally are resistant to change and don't like changes forced on them. MS needs to remember that.

    For these employees there would be no time or cost savings achieved by attempting to use the Start Screen, only lost productivity.
    I agree. There is no evidence to suggest people who use the new Start Screen are more productive than those who use the desktop and start menu. After all, most of their work is done in Word, Excel, custom apps, or their browser, not the Windows UI. If the new Start Screen improved worker efficiency/productivity, then things might be different.
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  7. #27


    N. Calif
    Posts : 2,583
    W10 Pro (desktop), W10 (laptop), W10 Pro (tablet), W10 (laptop)


    This whole thread makes no sense to me. When Win 8 was first released, I don't recall people asking what the future held for Win 7. Same with XP when Vista was released or Vista when Win 7 was released. Once a new OS is released that supersedes the previous one, then development ceases on the old OS except for security updates. What company would continue to develop the old OS when they want you to move to the new one?
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  8. #28


    Central IL
    Posts : 3,468
    Linux Mint 17.2


    Quote Originally Posted by strollin View Post
    This whole thread makes no sense to me. When Win 8 was first released, I don't recall people asking what the future held for Win 7. Same with XP when Vista was released or Vista when Win 7 was released. Once a new OS is released that supersedes the previous one, then development ceases on the old OS except for security updates. What company would continue to develop the old OS when they want you to move to the new one?
    They did that with NT4, with the various Service Packs. NT4 was pretty much the longest surviving OS around, before XP replaced it.
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  9. #29


    Quote Originally Posted by Itaregid View Post
    Wastes 95% of the screen? Nah! Let's avoid extreme exaggerations, okay? And remember, the standard W7 taskbar can easily be set to autohide when an app is open so the app has 100% of the screen's real estate IF THE USER SO DESIRES - and that's the point. It is, or should be, the user's choice.
    You misunderstand. I mean that the start menu uses only maybe 5% of the screen when active, which is a complete and total waste of all those additional pixels that could be put to active use when the user is actually looking for something. What might take 3-4 cascading menus with the start menu can all be put on a single screen with the start screen.

    Had it been my decision, I would have borrowed an idea from the Xbox 360 firmware. Namely the bladed popup you get when you press the "X" button in the middle of the controller. You could have used at least 75% of the screen, leaving enough so users don't feel completely transported from their environment, and kind of split the difference. One blade for all programs in a big jumble and then an individual blade for each program group if you wanted to go about it that way.

    Let's also remember one of the primary reasons why Windows and the "wintel" PC is the dominant OS and hardware platform and not MacOS and Macs, is because Windows allows for every user to customize Windows and their hardware as they chose. Macs were totally proprietary. Apple's way or no way. Microsoft forcing a totally new UI - with the STATED intent of making it so Windows 8 users will automatically like and choose Windows Phones over other types, went over like a lead balloon.[/QUOTE]
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  10. #30


    Quote Originally Posted by LAX View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by asvent View Post
    Plus, you show me a Windows 8 user who complains about the missing start menu and I'll show you a Windows 8 user who likely doesn't know about the search charm and how it blows the start menu completely out of the water.
    That doesn't work effectively in an Enterprise environment. In addition to standard MSOffice we also work with a great deal of customized software developed for a global user-base. The large program infrastructure makes it infeasible to remember the program names to enable a search. That and the program titles don't follow US English norms given that they were developed overseas.

    Having these programs nearly compacted into the Start Menu makes life so much easier, particularly when training new employees with no prior exposure to this software. It just eliminates the need to hunt all over the massive Start Screen to locate and sequentially open programs when this can be more efficiently accomplished as a process-driven tasks.

    For these employees there would be no time or cost savings achieved by attempting to use the Start Screen, only lost productivity.
    Actually, I'd say that this is based more on your IT department's limited range of thinking than anything else. You could very easily create a grouping of all of these programs on the start screen, and it would probably be even easier because they have bigger icons and text under them so you can clearly see what it is you're looking at. The start screen has essentially all the same functionality of the start menu, it's just rearranged a bit. Think of it like how tennis is really just ping-pong while standing on the table. You just have to be able to take a step back and look at things from a new/fresh perspective.

    In a great many ways, Windows 8 is even more Enterprise friendly because of the start screen. Imagine trying to do support over the phone. "Click on the start button..." "What's that?" "Okay, you see a blue orb thing in the lower left corner of the screen?" "Yes" "Great, click on that" "OK" "Now go to all programs, whatever, and click on whateverelse." As opposed to "You see the big box that says whateverwhatever?" "Yes" "Great, click on that" and done. The one thing I will say, is I'm not sure how the start screen integrates into active directory, so how much control a company could exercise over what users saw if they were so inclined. That may be a concern for the Enterprise which isn't addressed, but it's on the pedantic side of things.
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Future For Windows 8.1
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