Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


W 8.1 update 1 on SSD - WIMBoot

  1. #21


    Posts : 23
    Windows 8.1 Professional x64


    jimbo/caperjack, sounds like you've both been burned during the DOS/Windows 3.1 days...and BAD!

    The compression technologies included in ZIPmagic are very mature and reliable...I would hope you would work up the courage to try them out some day.

    WIMBoot compression (DoubleSpace) and NTFS compression (DriveSpace), the two main workhorse disk compressors included in ZIPmagic, are both reversible, and have helped countless customers such as yourself eliminate the need to carry extra auxiliary storage, USB3 sticks, and so forth.

    Of course, if you're already packing a 512 GB Surface Pro 3, you may not need either ZIPmagic, or the auxiliary storage But then again, what if you could use that as a 1 TB tablet...

    A terabyte tablet, now that's nice!

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  2. #22


    Posts : 2,627
    win8.1.1 enterprise


    ah,had you mentioned the name zipmagic i would not have even posted my first post .
    i thought you were going to doublespace your harddrive for more space ,but now it looks like you mean you zip files for storage ,that ok,but i would be cautious in doublespacing the whole ssd drive with windows installed on it
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  3. #23


    Posts : 23
    Windows 8.1 Professional x64


    caperjack, ZIPmagic includes both a full suite of archive management tools (for 110 file types, including ZIP):

    www.zipmagic.co/screenshots.html - based on Codex Plug-In Technology

    And also three full disk compression tools:

    www.zipmagic.co/stacker.html - based on data deduplication
    www.zipmagic.co/doublespace.html - based on WIMBoot
    www.zipmagic.co/drive-space.html - based on NTFS compression

    A long time has passed since the early 90's. ZIPmagic's full disk compression tools are safe, secure, and fast.

    For example, please see:

    A simpler way to free up 12GB plus of disk space using WIMBoot on DV8P - Page 2
    For a very thorough discussion.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #24


    Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts : 6,490
    Windows 10 Education 64 Bit


    I can see it being an advantage if you have a tablet with a non replaceable (or not easily replaceable) SSD that is small in size. IMHO, in any other device I'd just put in a bigger SSD or add a second drive for storage. Your going to trade off speed for a more room. I would rather not cripple my SSD's speed advantage. Just my 2 cents.
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  5. #25


    Posts : 23
    Windows 8.1 Professional x64


    Quote Originally Posted by alphanumeric View Post
    I can see it being an advantage if you have a tablet with a non replaceable (or not easily replaceable) SSD that is small in size. IMHO, in any other device I'd just put in a bigger SSD or add a second drive for storage. Your going to trade off speed for a more room. I would rather not cripple my SSD's speed advantage. Just my 2 cents.
    Agreed. The primary segment is the "budget SSD" sector, tablets with fixed storage, and (private virtual) servers which are very difficult to upgrade/relocate.

    Although I must mention that the performance impact is virtually unnoticeable with DriveSpace (NTFS compression - built in the early 90s when CPU's were at least a thousand times slower), and only marginally noticeable with DoubleSpace (WIMBoot compression - launched this very year) - and only when files which are being updated are being extracted for the first time from the WIM archive, at that. On subsequent operations, even across reboots, there is no performance impact, even with WIMBoot.
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  6. #26


    What do you do if the computer dies and you have to move the drive to another computer to access the data?

    Putting aside performance questions or how safe and effective the program is, my basic question is why would you want to do this? Drives are cheap. If you need more space add another drive or get a larger one.

    I understand why people encrypt their drives but I don't get the point of drive compression.

    I guess like most computer related things, it comes down to personal preference.
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  7. #27


    Posts : 23
    Windows 8.1 Professional x64


    Rich, drive compression is not drive encryption. You can take an NTFS (DriveSpace) compressed disk, and use it on any computer, via a USB connection, internal attachment, or what have you. Similarly, you can take a WIMBoot (DoubleSpace) compressed disk, and again use it on any Windows 8.1 Update 1 computer; again via a USB connection, internal attachment, or what have you. The data is not encrypted. It remains fully available and accessible at all times.

    If you don't get the point of drive compression, you may be one of those lucky in the 1%: You are able to afford large SSDs, buy the biggest tablets, etc. Clearly, in this scenario, the 1% does not have much of a need for disk compression.

    If you are in the 99% though, chances are at some point, you will benefit very much from disk compression.

    As you say, it really is personal preference - or shall we say - circumstance.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #28


    Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts : 6,490
    Windows 10 Education 64 Bit


    IMHO Your 1% versus 99% is a big exaggeration. People that need terabytes of storage don't buy a tablet and expect to store that amount of data on it. Or even a laptop with an SSD for that matter. If you need that kind of storage you buy spinners, its that simple. Or you use portable storage. My desktop PC's have an SSD for the OS and a large spinner for Data. My laptop has two SSD's in it. 128 GB for Windows and a 256 GB for DATA. That is all it needs as most of my files are stored on my desktop PC's. My wife's laptop has just the one 256 GB SSD in it. It's more than enough for what she does on that PC. SSD's are a lot more affordable that they used to be and prices are going to continue to drop as they become more main stream and replace spinners in a lot of scenarios. I'm sure your program is great but telling me it's needed by 99 % of PC users, really? I don't think so Tim.
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  9. #29


    I just realized WimBoot is not drive compression, it booting a compressed drive image, very different.

    That could be fun to do and I may try it just for grins but I see no real use for it for most people. Maybe businesses could make use of it but I don't see this as a home user tool.

    Just my own $.02 worth.

    Interesting topic though.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #30


    Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts : 6,490
    Windows 10 Education 64 Bit


    It's really suited to a device that has a very small non upgradable SSD. A tablet where the SSD is integrated into the motherboard for example. Or one that you would more than likely break it if you tried to open it up to replace the SSD with a bigger one. Like you say, not something the average Joe at home is likely to mess with. It is cool technology, I'll say that.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

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W 8.1 update 1 on SSD - WIMBoot
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