Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Will SSD boost my laptop perf lot more than regular HDD ?

  1. #1


    Posts : 30
    Windows 8.1 Single Language English

    Will SSD boost my laptop perf lot more than regular HDD ?


    I have been getting some errors in Windows 8.1 preinstalled on my laptop (HP 15 Notebook - t063tu model) which is just about 1.5 yrs old. Seems the internal hard drive is going to fail soon, and I am advised by my IT Admin that I should buy a new hard drive asap to replace the defective one.

    While checking on some forums and some people have suggested that SSDs boost system performance a lot more compared to regular hard drives. But SSDs cost almost thrice as much - for the same capacity - 500Gb. So, would like to know if it's really worth investing in a new SSD instead of a standard laptop hard drive, and what would be the life of an SSD compared to a regular hard drive.

    I understand that SSDs consume less power, and boot up the system much faster, but are they suitable for all-day computing, as I use my laptop for 10+ hours daily ?

    Would be grateful if I get expert advise on this. Thanks.

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #2



    Trying to Sith things out
    Bamberg Germany
    Posts : 2,213
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit


    If you have SATA3 cables(6GBb/s) and AHCI turned on in you UEFI/BIOS, your laptop will be much more responsive and faster.
    All you need to do is just make sure you get an SSD as large as, or larger than your current one. And then make a system image of your current install, and reimage it to your new one.
    After imaging to your SSD, open up an admin command prompt and type winsat formal so Windows will run a system check and correct any settings itself(it checks the read/write per second)

    The newest Generation of SSDs will probably last as long your PC. For example the Samsung 840 Pro 256GB can into the Petabyte range before catastrophic failure.
    You will see a lot of "ancient" advice regarding tweaking for your SSD, but all that is crap now. Just let Windows take care of everything.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #3


    Posts : 30
    Windows 8.1 Single Language English


    Thanks Cliff. I don't have any cables that you mention. So, will need someone (my IT Admin in office) to help me with the process you mention. However, my key concern is the huge difference in costs, between the SSDs and regular HDDs. Here in India, a 250Gb Samsung 850 EVO SSD costs about $70 while a Seagate / WD 500Gb laptop HDD costs about $40. Also, read in some forum posts that not all SSDs are compatible with all laptops (unlike regular laptop HDDs). Hence, mentioned my model - HP 15 Notebook (r063tu) - in the earlier post.

    If the performance boost comes only from attaching the SSD to a SATA-III cable as you mentioned, I wonder if that provision is there in my laptop in the first place (before I decide on buying an SSD AND the SATA-III cable).
    I usually use my laptop for three years. This one has been with me for 1.5 years, so wonder if investing in an SSD is worth the money, justifying any significant performance improvement over a regular SSD.

    Can you please suggest a compatible make/model of SSD of minimum 250Gb for my make & model of laptop ?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #4



    Trying to Sith things out
    Bamberg Germany
    Posts : 2,213
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit


    If it only 1.5 years old, I would be pretty sure it has a SATA3 even my 4 year old ASUS X54C has that.
    All SATA SSDs will be compatible(as opposed to M.2).
    But I see you also only have 4GB RAM, the "sweet spot" is 8GB for multi tasking.
    The SSD will speed up booting and shutdown, also opening your programs, running antivirus scans, and searching your system.

    More RAM will improve performance when you have more than one or two programs running, such as browsing and using office, and listening to music and so on.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #5


    Posts : 30
    Windows 8.1 Single Language English


    Yes Cliff. I have just 4Gb RAM, and often notice that over 80% of it is consumed by my regular usage. I don't use multimedia (no video / music while working) often, but do have all three browsers - IE, Firefox, and Chrome - with many tabs open in them. This with a few Word &/ Excel / Powerpoint files open and my laptop crawls.

    So, I understand from your response that perhaps upgrading RAM to 8Gb would be more beneficial to improve performance than opting for an SSD with just 4Gb RAM. But, like I mentioned earlier, I might use this laptop for another 2 years max, so feel investing in additional components like SSD or RAM should be worth it. From what you've posted and I realize from experience, seems I should first upgrade RAM to 8Gb and observe performance. If that doesn't satisfy me, then perhaps I could consider getting my HDD replaced with an SSD as well.

    And it's reassuring to know that my laptop would probably have a SATA-III connectivity option.

    P.S.: While I have been using laptops of various makes over the past decade or so, observed that laptop HDDs have more or less remained at 5400 rpm, unlike desktop HDDs which now come with min 7200 rpm, or even 10k rpm in some cases. Hence, thought with i3 4th gen processor and 4Gb RAM, my laptop HDD @5400 rpm is probably the "weak-link" slowing down my system.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #6



    Trying to Sith things out
    Bamberg Germany
    Posts : 2,213
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit


    If you are not really worried about boot speed, or how fast a program opens, I mean if you usually just sleep or hybrid hibernate your laptop, You might be better served with a HDD and more RAM first(that was how my laptops upgrades went, I got more RAM first).

    RAM isn't too expensive any more, and, there are some good SSDs for lower prices. If you just browse and use office, and don't move too many large files around, even a cheaper SSD is a big boost(like from Sandisk).

    But if you can only afford one or the other at first, RAM might be the better bet for now, because after Windows reads or finds what it need, for a program to be used, the majority of the work is done between the CPU and RAM, then written to disk after.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #7


    Posts : 30
    Windows 8.1 Single Language English


    You are right Cliff. I am considering only either of the two - a new SSD or a RAM upgrade, owing to costs. Moreover, as you mentioned RAM upgrade even with my current HDD would boost performance significantly. I mean, regular HDD with 8Gb RAM would perhaps be better than SSD with 4Gb RAM. And since I am able to afford only one of the two, would go for RAM upgrade. Besides, I can get 4Gb RAM for about $26 while a 250b SSD of Sandisk / Samsung costs about $75. Thanks again for your advise and clarifications.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #8



    Trying to Sith things out
    Bamberg Germany
    Posts : 2,213
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit


    Quote Originally Posted by rameshiyer View Post
    You are right Cliff. I am considering only either of the two - a new SSD or a RAM upgrade, owing to costs. Moreover, as you mentioned RAM upgrade even with my current HDD would boost performance significantly. I mean, regular HDD with 8Gb RAM would perhaps be better than SSD with 4Gb RAM. And since I am able to afford only one of the two, would go for RAM upgrade. Besides, I can get 4Gb RAM for about $26 while a 250b SSD of Sandisk / Samsung costs about $75. Thanks again for your advise and clarifications.
    You're welcome. Maybe for the SSD you might find a good priced one later. Plus they are getting better quality for less money all the time.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #9


    If budget allows, I see no reason to go with hard drives these days. SSDs have no moving parts so they inherent have better reliability. This is especially true with today's generation SSDs. Some even come with 10 year warranties! And of course, the slowest SSD will run circles around the fastest hard drives, even hybrid hard drives (HDs with SSD buffers).

    Note too with notebooks, there are even more advantages to SSDs. They are lighter, they consume less battery power and they generate less heat.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #10


    Posts : 30
    Windows 8.1 Single Language English


    Well, @Itaregid, budget is a constraint, as I wish to upgrade RAM with another 4Gb module, and getting a new HDD to replace my failing one is top-priority. On hard drive, I am considering replacing my current "HGST 500Gb 6Gb/s SATA-III 5400rpm 8Mb cache" one with a "WD / Seagate 500Gb 6Gb/s SATA-III 7200rpm 32Mb cache" one. Read that the latter would significantly boost performance, perhaps without having to upgrade RAM from current 4Gb.
    Just for ref. a 4Gb RAM costs about $25, 5400rpm HDD $55, while a 7200rpm HDD costs about $75, and a 250Gb SSD (Samsung/Sandisk) costs $80+. So, if I had to only replace HDD, I might consider getting either 7200rpm HDD (or compromise on capacity and buy an SSD of 250Gb for $80). But, if I HAVE TO upgrade RAM as well, then I need to cut corners.

    I get your point about SSDs being ideal for laptops as they consume less power, weigh less, and generate less heat - all ideal factors to use with laptops. But their exorbitant prices make them less attractive.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

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Will SSD boost my laptop perf lot more than regular HDD ?

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