Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


Trying to determine if I can swap two i7 mobile processors

  1. #1


    Posts : 4
    Windows Server 2012 (x64) - [As a workstation]

    Trying to determine if I can swap two i7 mobile processors


    Can anyone give me guidance if these two different core i7 processors from a pair of laptops is compatible? Any help is greatly appreciated.

    TARGET MACHINE:
    MODEL: dv6-6b22he
    SERIAL: 2CE1450H62
    PRODUCT: AIT68UA#ABA
    CPU: 2nd generation Intel Core i7-2670QM Processor 2.20 GHz with Turbo Boost Technology up to 3.10 GHz

    AVAILABLE REPLACEMENT CPU FROM:
    MODEL dv6-7267cl
    SERIAL: 2CE23625BR
    PRODUCT: C2L42UA#ABA
    CPU: 3rd generation Intel Core i7-3630QM Processor 2.24GHz with Turbo Boost Technology up to 3.40GHz
    Last edited by FILMGUY; 28 Mar 2016 at 02:09. Reason: Length limitation [and a grammatic typo]

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #2


    Posts : 4
    Windows Server 2012 (x64) - [As a workstation]


    OK, no answers or speculation. I hate to do it, but does anyone have opinions on swapping them and "finding out" presuming they are the same socket? I don't like doing that on two levels as I mentioned, possibility on burning things up and the posibilty something breaks during the disassembly and reasembly of the laptop.

    No suggestions on where this might be covered in print? I have canvassed Intel and HP to no avail.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #3


    Well, I guess you're due an answer, even if it's wrong. lol

    Cpu's in laptops are not the easiest things to change. It's also conceivable that when they decide on a certain CPU chip for a laptop, that they also program the BIOS to work with just that one CPU chip, so that no other CPU chip is going to work on that same motherboard.

    I wouldn't even think of trying a CPU swap on a laptop, because when I've tried it on a desktop PC, it failed to boot. And I've found desktops to be much more forgiving than laptops.

    Now having said all that, I have to ask "WHY?" would you even want to change CPU chips on a laptop?

    Just curious!

    TechnoMage
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #4


    Austin TX metro area
    Posts : 640
    Windows 7 Pro 64bit [MS blue-disk set]


    And, a question: If enduser has OEM Windows on one or both laptops, would the CPU swap cause problems? I too recommend not swapping, how about leaving presently working things - alone?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #5


    Posts : 4
    Windows Server 2012 (x64) - [As a workstation]

    RE: Swap


    Thank you both for replying. The nature of my post that would have answered those questions was cut off by the board likely because I am in newbie mode here as compared to the old Seven Forums, anyway I will get right to it.

    Hello Techno.
    Cpu's in laptops are not the easiest things to change. It's also conceivable that when they decide on a certain CPU chip for a laptop, that they also program the BIOS to work with just that one CPU chip, so that no other CPU chip is going to work on that same motherboard.
    This and asset tagging in the BIOS is/was one of my primary concerns that I do not think aside from phoning a "real" engineer at HP is something that could be found anywhere, barring another user already making the same swap.

    I wouldn't even think of trying a CPU swap on a laptop, because when I've tried it on a desktop PC, it failed to boot. And I've found desktops to be much more forgiving than laptops.
    My original post touched on this as well. I wear out laptops like people wear out shoes. I have always owned HP laptops (and not because I am an HP fanboy) but rather because every time when I compare all metrics with price and what will suit the need at that time, I find HP's lines at least in the past have won out. That being said, if I get 3 years out of a laptop I am pleased. Huh most people say? During that time I will replace on average three keyboards as they just wear out. I do not complain about such things much, for if you use or run a laptop 10-20 hours every day, I figure I have well over shot the devices' intended lifetime. I have been programing computers since the MOSS 6502 era 35+ years ago which helps to decreases my fear (sometimes wrongly) of servicing things. In that era we still serviced EVERYTHING! I also work heavily with surface mount technology in the equipment I design and some I repair, so my fear and loathing for it is less than most - but I will say OT, the worst thing that happened to the electronics build and repair industries was the move away from Eutectic type 63/37 solder. (Silver solder makes melt and remelt temps often so high they destroy the device.) I am typing this into a dual CPU Quad Core Xeon W/32GB of ECC FBDIM RAM server of my own design which has 8 physical cores (since my last laptop went...) and have changed more CPU's, chipsets and SMC's on systems like this and others more times than most I would imagine. I actually OEM'ed the specs on these servers ten or more years ago! (Don't ask what this technology cost back then!) What I tried to post initially was that my greatest fear, even though I have done this in the past (had to replace this last laptop's motherboard) it is not easy work and in my experience, every time I must open a laptop (not desktops or servers) you subtract one from the magical number of times you can successfully open up the system before one ends up wearing something out and breaking it - or no repair is possible due to its nature. So yes I have concerns every time I open one up. This used machine got a new flat panel, bezel, and keyboard - all things I have no fear in changing on any maker's laptops. CPU's are easily changed after every screw and connector is in a pile in the lab - so I loath CPU replacements on laptops for they are easily destroyed when you have to dismantle them that far.

    Now having said all that, I have to ask "WHY?" would you even want to change CPU chips on a laptop?
    Because if you look at the specs on my old CPU compared to this new (used repaired unit) you'll see a tremendous increase in specs and instructions supported.

    I should have mentioned above, I have done this before with successful results but absolutely agree that even if a person does not mechanically break the laptop in question tearing it down to the CPU, the notion of compatibility is hit or miss. I have done this once and it luckily worked. You need to flash the BIOS first (breaking it forever with its OEM configuration) tear it down, swap CPU's and if religious do lots of praying.

    Don't misunderstand, I realize such a procedure is the fastest most painful way of creating a door stop out of your laptop - that much I will concede.

    And, a question: If enduser has OEM Windows on one or both laptops, would the CPU swap cause problems?
    Hello Roland and thank you as well for posting. The BIOS issue there are answers to as far as how to port this OEM system to another etc. but they require (AND I MEAN LEGAL METHODS HERE) some work with the SLIC key and BIOS reprogramming. I would have an answer for you, but I just pay Microsoft for the OS's of theirs I use and don't worry about OEM activation as it is not worth it for me to waste time and money on that considering how I license here. Besides, laptops are the only thing we buy here that are pre-programmed with an OS and full of bloat - all of that must be removed, so a fresh install is mandatory anyhow.

    how about leaving presently working things - alone?
    Well that is one of two alternatives - clearly the easiest and safest notion - I get that. But just the same, if someone pipes up and says, "Yes I have done such a swap and here are some pointers and suggestions on what worked for me..." Would be invaluable advice. The fact that we are all aware tearing a laptop down to yank the CPU even if it were to put in an identical processor is at best sort of scary and at worst, might cause total destruction of the machine.

    Below, I think it should be OK to post hyperlinks to the data sheets so you will see why (since I have the other CPU sitting before me) I have even considered a trade. And as a postscript if anyone has any suggestions of forums and corners of the Internet where this question might be less out of place, I would welcome that as well. Thank you both.

    PROCESSOR IN TARGET MACHINE RUNNING NOW:
    Intel® Coreā„¢ i7-2670QM Processor (6M Cache, up to 3.10 GHz) Specifications

    EXTRA PROCESSOR I WOULD WISH TO SWAP:
    Intel® Coreā„¢ i7-2670QM Processor (6M Cache, up to 3.10 GHz) Specifications

    Cheers everyone for the feedback. Now that this much is over and you know I understand the risks involved, if others wish to reply, it would be helpful if they no longer question my motivation or tell horror stories I have already lived. But, rather any comments on actually performing such a swap would be of most relevance. I know I can not be the only user on Earth to have had to replace laptop CPU's before - right?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #6


    UK
    Posts : 41
    Windows 8.1 Update 1 64bit Pro


    I have done a laptop cpu swap before, but I didnt do it blind, I knew beforehand it was compatible.
    Some laptops may not have things like the fan removable tho which would make it too diffulcult.
    In my case different variants of the same laptop were released with different cpu's meaning the motherboard was compatible with all those cpu's. I switched from a celeron to a core2duo, on spec both cpu's were the same except core2duo was dual core vs single core and the cure2duo had a bit more advanced power saving, clock speeds, bus speeds etc. all matched up.
    So one way to find out is look for you laptop on the manufacturers website and see if there is different variants of it using that cpu.

    In my opinion tho if the cpu is not compatible, all that will happen is it wont post, it may not even fit if its a different socket type. They both have the same TDP so probably also the same operating voltage, which means in my opinion you wont break the cpu or board trying.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #7


    Posts : 4
    Windows Server 2012 (x64) - [As a workstation]

    Re:cpu swap


    Hey thanks Chrysalis. My one trade out was done just like yours. The first research I did was with all the specs from HP - just as you mention. Two dv6 HP Laptops. Even with some (good) differences, the thing that derailed me was these were produced as HP was making a switch with the Core i7 line from Gen 2 to Gen 3. Thanks for mentioning this as I did all of my homework with HP and Intel - but what had not occurred to me is to look for other models - even makers that have both products in the same line and make those comparisons. There is a major difference in the performance of the two chips though that could be from a better chipset or other related hardware. Thanks a lot. Maybe Google will bring people here during my research and say No! No! or yes, that works.

    So your post has given me some new sources to study and compare.

    What I did not tell the group on post#1 is that this was an eBay disaster. Apparently the seller thought a broken screen, screen bezel broken flat panel harness along with ten rolls of scotch tape constitute being listed "only cosmetic" and fumier yet since they broke more than they fixed - "seller refurbished" well someone is going to nail them one day and "bust" them back down to reality.

    I would have gotten into it with the seller and Pay-Pal, but I needed a portable machine as I am going to be teaching classes in the coming weeks and need to have something to keep me in order and on topic. The only plus is the great person that sold me the flatpanel (I think still it was a brand anew item) - super resolution and wonderful LED backlighting. I know the (bad/original) seller replaced the keyboard as he installed the wrong one - it should be lighted on that model.. And while I have a spare lighted one here, I really fear working on anything this person might have. Talking to myself here, I should likely just deal with the slowness and use it only for regular Laptop use and not how I usually run the pants off them and call it a day.

    I will do some more research and maybe someone will post. Otherwise, I will close this thread at the end of the week. Thank you everyone and thank you all in advance for anything else someone might want to add.
    Last edited by FILMGUY; 29 Mar 2016 at 01:20. Reason: Grammar
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

Trying to determine if I can swap two i7 mobile processors
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