Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums

Is my psu enough

  1. #1


    Pakistan,Hyderabad
    Posts : 30
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64/Windows 7 Ultimate x64 Dual Boot

    Is my psu enough


    Hey guys I want to ask that is my psu enough to run my pc you can see my specs from my account thanks
    My psu is 600 watt cooler master silent pro

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #2


    Posts : 2,690
    Windows 3.1 > Windows 10


    Do you have a way to record or monitor the system voltage(s)?
    that is the only real way to tell, if the PSU is able to provide enough wattage while the pc is under load
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #3


    Do you have a way to record or monitor the system voltage(s)?
    that is the only real way to tell, if the PSU is able to provide enough wattage while the pc is under load
    Ummm, No! Sorry, but that is not true at all. Wattage cannot be determined by the voltage alone in any electronics.

    Monitoring the voltage will only tell you if the +12, +5, and +3.3VDC voltages are within the ATX maximum 5% tolerance ranges allowed. The voltages tell you absolutely nothing about the wattage. This is because, as per Ohm's Law power formulas, you need to know both the voltage (which we know) plus the current on the rails to determine the actual wattage. And measuring the actual current is something only a qualified technician with the necessary test equipment can determine. There is no hardware monitoring program that measures current, and therefore, none monitor wattage either. The one exception is Corsair Link software which is exclusively for specific Corsair power supplies and requires a separate USB data connection to your computer.

    The "published" specs, however, tell us there are 34 amps on the single +12VDC rail. That equates to 408W on the 12V rail which is more than enough to support your graphics card (the most power hungry device in your computer) and the rest of your components with plenty of headroom to spare.

    To make sure your PSU is outputting voltages within the required tolerance ranges, you can use Speccy (from the makers of CCleaner) to check some (depending on motherboard sensors) of your voltages, or look in the BIOS Setup Menu. Alternatively you can use a PSU Tester that has a LCD readout.

    That said, I would not worry about it unless your computer is having stability issues (locking up, shutting down, rebooting).

    BTW, when I look at the MSI GTX 970 website, it shows 9 different versions of their GTX 970 card, and all have 4Gb of on board RAM yet in your System Specs, you say 3.5Gb.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #4


    Posts : 2,690
    Windows 3.1 > Windows 10


    Voltage is the amount of push. watts is the amount of work load.. As you increase the work load, available wattage decreases..
    if work load is excess of the watts supplied = voltage drops
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #5


    Sorry, but you are either entirely confused, or someone is feeding you a bunch of bull, because with all due respect, you really don't know what you are talking about.

    Do you understand what voltage regulation is about? The voltage regulation circuits in the power supply ensure that in spite of any variances in the input power, AND variances in the load on the output, the output voltages WILL remain constant.

    if work load is excess of the watts supplied = voltage drops
    What??? Yeah! Because the PSU is "overloaded" and it stops working! If the load exceeds the capability of the supply, you need a bigger PSU!
    As you increase the work load, available wattage decreases..
    That really makes no sense. Of course the available wattage decreases. Any PSU is only capable of delivering so much. That's why they are rated by their wattage. If the PSU is capable of delivering 500W, and the combined load is 250W, then you have 250 left. If the load increases to 300W, then of course the available wattage decreases to 200.

    But you still cannot determine wattage (consumed or available) by monitoring the voltage alone. You MUST also know either the current, or the resistance of the circuit.

    If the voltage decreases because the load increases (and you have not exceeded the capability of the supply) then you have a faulty power supply!

    All ATX power supplies are designed and required to deliver +12VDC, +5VDC and +3.3VDC 5% across the full range of expected loads!

    Read up on Ohm's Law. Then note power formulas in the Ohm's Law Formula Wheel.

    P = E x I or Voltage x Current.

    Then read up on 80 PLUS Certified PSUs.

    Please note this is stuff taught in any Jr High basic electronics class.
    Last edited by Itaregid; 06 Jun 2015 at 08:35. Reason: Fixed 80 Plus link
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #6


    United States
    Posts : 3,093
    Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit


    This is a very good post at tom'sHARDWARE, be sure to click on the see full content hot spot: Power Supply Efficiency Myths - Power Supplies - Components
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #7


    Unfortunately, there is a lot of confusion around computer power supplies. Some is just due to a lack of education and understanding of electronics. Some confusion is due to the many variables involved when it comes to computers and computer power supplies.

    But much is due to misguided, and in some cases, deceitful "marketing hype" by power supply makers! And finally some confusion is due to irresponsible bloggers and others who fail to do their homework first and simply pass along incorrect information, or worse, fabricate their own. And then there are some who have swapped out a power supply or added RAM or assembled a computer who suddenly feel they are electronics experts.

    This leads many to not understanding the importance of using a quality supply from a reputable maker. One of the biggest mistakes users can make is to cut corners in the budget by buying a cheap power supply. Yet everything inside the computer relies on quality (clean, stable, and within tolerance) power.

    One of the biggest misconceptions is some believe too big a PSU may deliver too many watts for the computer to handle. That's not how electronics work. If the computer (motherboard, RAM, CPU, drives, graphics) need 200W, they will draw from the PSU 200W, regardless if the PSU is rated at 350W or 750W. And the PSU will draw from the wall just 200W too, plus another 40W (wasted in the form of heat) due to PSU inefficiencies (assuming a 80% efficiency rating at that load level) - again regardless the capability of the PSU.

    It is true that this is "basic electronics" stuff. DC is what is taught in beginning electronics classes with Ohm's Law (E = IR) right at the foundation. But of course, not all study electronics, or go on to be students of electronics either as future engineers, or as certified electronics technicians from trade and technical schools.

    @ Brandon Bias - Sorry for the distractions. Assuming this is your PSU, since it is 80 Plus Certified, if you look here you can see your PSU maintains at least 80% efficiency across 20, 50 and 100% loads. That is very good as typical (non-80 PLUS certified) power supplies tend to have just one efficiency peak (a "Bell" curve). And sadly, that PSU will most likely be marketed at that one high rating.

    But computers provide a wide variety of loads on the PSU, depending on what the user is doing. Your PSU has a relatively "flat" efficiency curve so it is efficient whether the computer is idle, or tasks with demanding 3D animated gaming.

    And in reading a couple reviews of your PSU, it obtained excellent "voltage regulation" ratings, meaning as the load varied, the output voltages remained constant at +3.3VDC, +5VDC and +12VDC 5% as required by the ATX standard - all while maintaining a very respectable low ripple levels.

    So not only is your PSU fully capable of supporting your hardware with lots of wattage headroom to spare, but does it with good, clean, stable power too.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #8


    Pakistan,Hyderabad
    Posts : 30
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64/Windows 7 Ultimate x64 Dual Boot


    Thanks I suppose than there is no need to replace my psu
    Thanks guys for all of your replies
    Much appreciated.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #9


    Assuming it is working properly, then no. Your PSU is just fine.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

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