Windows 8 and 8.1 Forums


What to do and not to do on SSD drives in Windows.

  1. #1

    What to do and not to do on SSD drives in Windows.


    If you are running Windows 8 on an SSD you need to disable fast start up or hibernation to prolong the life of the drive.


    Storage talk: Understanding your solid-state drive | How To - CNET

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #2


    Not really. If you need more gigabytes than you can do some of the stuff in that article but otherwise totally not needed.

    Newer modern ssd's will last longer than you will have use for it bud. No need to worry about writes and the likes.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #3


    from that site
    "So how long is long? To help users estimate how long an SSD will last, SSD vendors such as OCZ have come up with formula: a drive's life span equals its capacity multiplied by its write endurance rating, divided by the average daily writes. For example, the 120GB Vertex 3 SSD has a write endurance rating of 3,000 cycles. If you write 50GB on the drive daily, the total number of days the drive will last before becoming unreliable is: (120 x 3,000)/50 = 7,200 days, which is about 20 years. If you write an average of 100GB a day, the drive would last about 10 years."

    lol just stop worrying about the life of your SSD, by the time its unreliable tech will have moved on and you wont be using your SSD anyway
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #4


    Id assume any solid state drive would outlast every normal drive by at least ten years! No moving parts
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #5


    No need to worry about SSD life, other components might fail before the SSD.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #6


    I can tell all of you from personal experience to not get too comfortable with the SSD's. Logically, you would think that they would have a much lower failure rate than a standard drive since they are all electronic, but I am not sure this is true. I am a computer technician and support systems which use these drives, and they seem to fail just as often as standard drives. I do not have any official numbers or failure rates , however. To make matters worse, most of the time when they fail, it is virtually impossible to recover data from them because they just die and the PC no longer even detects they are installed. These drives are memory chips on a circuit board. If the board goes bad, the chips can sometimes be moved to a good one by a recovery agency, but if the memory chips fail, your data is lost! Data recovery agencies also charge big bucks for recovery!! Moral of the story is, keep your stuff backed up!
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #7


    Redmond
    Posts : 651
    Windows 8.1 x64


    Yes, they do fail about as often as their mechanical counterparts - that's kind of the point I usually make to articles that seem to impart the idea that you shouldn't put normal OS mechanisms like these on your SSD. Gen 2 and newer generally have at leastthe life expectancy of a regular mechanical disk, and usually moreso. Assuming the SSD in question is using a decent controller and firmware, of course, treating it differently isn't really all that useful. You made the point I would have liked to make without meaning to, and probably better than I could have too.

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #8


    Posts : 1,770
    Windows Phone 6, Windows CE 5, Windows Vista x32, Windows 7 x32/x64, Windows 8 x64


    Most of the newer SSDs come with their own optimisation/tuning software, which then sets everything for best performance and endurance for the system. The Samsung SSD Magician, for the SSD in my tablet, optimises the SSD as well as the OS, so that such things as Super Fetch, Defrag, Indexing are all disabled from the outset.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #9


    Quote Originally Posted by mikekoz View Post
    I can tell all of you from personal experience to not get too comfortable with the SSD's. Logically, you would think that they would have a much lower failure rate than a standard drive since they are all electronic, but I am not sure this is true. I am a computer technician and support systems which use these drives, and they seem to fail just as often as standard drives. I do not have any official numbers or failure rates , however. To make matters worse, most of the time when they fail, it is virtually impossible to recover data from them because they just die and the PC no longer even detects they are installed. These drives are memory chips on a circuit board. If the board goes bad, the chips can sometimes be moved to a good one by a recovery agency, but if the memory chips fail, your data is lost! Data recovery agencies also charge big bucks for recovery!! Moral of the story is, keep your stuff backed up!
    I was looking into buying an entry level SSD for my older rig but every time I would look at the user feedback (for any of the SSDs I was interested in), there were too many responses that indicated many SSDs were either failing prematurely and/or causing freezing at times. Now, many of these freezing problems were resolved by firmware updates but some of these updates took over 1 year to get posted for download and there were several complaints about "having to live with problems for so long." And, the biggest deterrent for me came when I saw that Crucial just posted a firmware update, for one of their SSD drives, that "must be installed on a clean hard drive!" Wow, that's nice... I hope all those poor souls did a backup! So, I'm sticking with the old spindle drives for now because I know I'll (most likely) get a bad SSD with my luck!
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #10


    Posts : 1,770
    Windows Phone 6, Windows CE 5, Windows Vista x32, Windows 7 x32/x64, Windows 8 x64


    After a lot of research, I found that Samsung and Intel appeared to be the most reliable of all SSDs and had the best reputation of all brands. OCZ seemed to be the most unreliable and some had come up with unflattering names for the OCZ acronym.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
What to do and not to do on SSD drives in Windows.
Related Threads
Hi I've been trying to figure the problem for some time now yet ive tried everything. Basically it wont boot when using a USB 3.0 flash drive (which is faster than the external usb 3 hard drive am using) It simply stalls on the boot image part (The blue windows icon). And on my laptop it gives a...
Been googling this for the last hour, and I still can't install a game via a virtual drive; keep getting "Windows cannot access specificed device, path, or file. You may not have appropriate permissions to access". Using Win8 Checked the Cdrom registry key to see if it was disabled (it's not),...
Poor Leo, He has lost two complete drives now due to corruption after booting from one drive, restarting, then using the BIOS to boot from another drive (both win8). He keeps getting "ERRORS, attempting to repair" on all of his drives. After chugging along for awhile, they usually boot but with...
Windows To Go Compatible Drives? in Drivers & Hardware
I know Microsoft put out a list of compatible drives for Windows To Go, and that it is only four drives long. Has anyone tested this feature on any other drives? Better yet, is there a list of features that a flash drive needs to support, such as a minimum read/write speed?
2 Hard Drives and 1 Windows Pro in Installation & Setup
So I recently upgraded pretty much all of the hardware in my computer including a second hard drive. I already had Windows 8 Pro on my other hard drive. Now I just put in the windows 8 CD when booting up my other hard drive and it seemed to install Windows 8 Pro fine. Once I opened it, it said that...
Two Windows 8 on Different Drives in Installation & Setup
I had a dual boot with Win7 & Win8. The Win 8 installation became unusable so I re-installed. It installed itself over Win 7. Now when I boot up I have a choice between two Win 8 installations. I have the working one set as default but I still have to select from the two at boot. How do I get rid...
I keep reading different interpretations on whether W8 does a trim command or defrag using the new "optimization" utility (formally defrag). Is there a DEFINITE answer on this ? Thanks
Eight Forums Android App Eight Forums IOS App Follow us on Facebook